The Joy of Cooking

The Joy of Cooking

3.8 32
by Irma S. Rombauer, Marion Rombauer Becker
     
 

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After the publication of her best-selling book To Begin Again, Naomi Levy received a flood of feedback from readers telling her how much the prayers in it had helped and moved them. Many urged her to publish a collection of her prayers--and now she has.

In a time when we all need inspiration, comfort, and connection, Talking to God will help us…  See more details below

Overview

After the publication of her best-selling book To Begin Again, Naomi Levy received a flood of feedback from readers telling her how much the prayers in it had helped and moved them. Many urged her to publish a collection of her prayers--and now she has.

In a time when we all need inspiration, comfort, and connection, Talking to God will help us reclaim prayer as an integral part of our lives, making it as natural and uninhibited as talking to our loved ones. Prayer is essential to the lives of millions, but many of us are searching for ways to supplement traditional prayers with ones that are less formal and more intimate.

Written in a simple and direct style, the prayers in this book--and the wonderful stories that accompany them--are for people of all faiths, and for all occasions large and small. Naomi Levy's personal prayers address the anxieties and roadblocks we all face in contemporary life. There are prayers for facing a new day, realizing one's potential at work, celebrating an anniversary or birthday, and going to sleep at night. And there are prayers for the more profound occurrences in life--love and marriage, pregnancy and childbirth, illness, loss, and death.

Rabbi Levy's words, imbued with grace and empathy, touch on the entire range of human experience. Many of us will recognize ourselves in her prayers and stories and will be comforted by them, as well as challenged and uplifted. Perhaps most important, they are stepping-stones for us to go on and create our own prayers, to find meaning in our own lives, and to begin or renew our own relationships with God.

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Editorial Reviews

bn.com
America's most popular kitchen bible has been revised for the first time in more than 20 years. Much is still familiar -- the recipe structure, with ingredients listed as they are called for, has been left intact, for instance -- but there's plenty that's new. Concerns about healthy eating are reflected throughout the new Joy, but old-fashioned, fat-laden dishes aren't gone entirely -- there are still plenty of appealing recipes for pies, tarts, puddings, eggs, and meats that set cholesterol scales tipping. As in previous revisions, changing tastes in food and the widening influence of ethnic cuisines have caused the most major changes in Joy. This is the ideal book for beginners, and a great reference for experienced cooks to have on hand as well.
Library Journal
Following the latest edition by nearly a decade, this new take on a classic drops some of the trendy stuff introduced earlier and returns to good, old-fashioned cooking like casseroles and canning. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher
James Beard The classic work, which covers the entire gamut of kitchen procedures and is easy to use.

Cecily Brownstone Important as is the information in this encyclopedic cookbook, it's the imprint of Irma Rombauer's and Marion Rombauer Becker's personalities that makes Joy of Cooking the best loved cookbook to come out of these United States.

Julia Child ...it is definitely number one on my list...the one book of all cookbooks in English that I would have on my shelf — if I could have but one.

Craig Claiborne The finest basic cookbook available. It is a masterpiece of clarity.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780451099938
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/01/1974
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 5.00(h) x 1.00(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

This recipe can be found in Joy Of Cooking's Stuffing chapter.

BASIC BREAD STUFFING
8 to 10 cups

This and the bread stuffing recipes that follow yield enough to stuff a 14- to 17-pound turkey. Many of the variations yield enough for an additional small casserole of stuffing. To stuff an oven roaster or 6 to 8 rock Cornish hens, halve the recipes. For a larger turkey, increase all the ingredients by half. The optional egg makes the stuffing firm. If you prefer the bread to be moist, skip the toasting step.

Position a rack in the center of the oven. Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Toast until golden brown:

1 pound sliced firm white sandwich, French, or Italian bread, including crusts, cut into 1/2-inch cubes, or 10 cups lightly packed bread cubes

Turn into a large bowl. Heat in a large skillet over medium-high heat until the foam subsides:

4 to 8 tablespoons (1/2 to 1 stick) unsalted butter

Add and cook, stirring, until tender, about 5 minutes:

2 cups chopped onions 1 cup finely chopped celery

Remove from the heat and stir in:

1/4 to 1/2 cup minced fresh parsley
1 teaspoon dried sage, or 1 tablespoon minced fresh
1 teaspoon dried thyme, or 1 tablespoon minced fresh
I teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated or ground nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
Stir into the bread cubes and toss until well combined. Depending on how much butter you started with and how firm you want the stuffing, stir in, a little at a time, until the stuffing is lightly moist but not packed together:
1/3 to 1 cup chicken stock 1 to 2 large eggs, well beaten (optional)

Adjust the seasonings. To use as a stuffing, reheat just before spooning it into the bird(s). Or moisten with additional:

Stock and/or egg
and turn into a large, shallow buttered baking dish. Bake in a 350°F oven until the top has formed a crust and the stuffing is heated through, 25 to 40 minutes.

This information can be found in the Joy Of Cooking's Poultry chapter.

RULES FOR STUFFING BIRDS

1. Always stuff the bird just before roasting2. Have the stuffing hot and pack it loosely in the body and neck cavities. The stuffing must reach a temperature of 160°F during roasting to ensure that any possible pathogens are killed. If it is cold and packed tightly into the bird, it will not heat to this point until long after the bird is cooked through.

3. You must close the cavities in order to keep the stuffing in place. The quickest and most efficient way to do this is by sewingthe cavities shut with a trussing needle and twine. If you do not own a trussing needle, secure the body cavity with small skewers and lacing (kits for this purpose are sold at kitchen shops) and close the neck cavity with toothpicks.

4. When the bird has cooked through, take the temperature of the stuffing by plunging the stem of the thermometer deep into the body cavity. If the stuffing has not yet reached 160°F, simply take the bird out of the oven, scoop the stuffing into a buttered casserole, and bake it in the hot oven while the bird stands before carving.

5. Finally, always take all the stuffing out of the cooked bird as soon as you begin to carve. Stuffing left inside a large turkey may remain warm for several hours, even if the bird is refrigerated, providing a perfect environment for bacterial growth.

Copyright © 1997 by Simon & Schuster Inc., The Joy of CookingTrust and the MRB Revocable Trust

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Meet the Author

Irma Rombauer self-published the first Joy of Cooking in 1931 with the small insurance payout she received after her husband committed suicide during the Great Depression. Suddenly, society wives who used to enjoy a kitchen staff no longer had the money to employ them and began cooking for themselves. The instruction "stand facing the stove" was a bit more pragmatic than we realize. In 1936, the first commercial edition was published by Bobbs-Merrill. Marion Rombauer Becker, Irma's daughter, joined the Joy dynasty and revised and updated each subsequent edition until 1975. That edition was the first after Irma's death and was completely Marion's. Her son, Ethan Becker, has returned the book to the family's voice, revising the 1975 edition for the 75th Anniversary Edition.

Irma Rombauer self-published the first Joy of Cooking in 1931 with the small insurance payout she received after her husband committed suicide during the Great Depression. Suddenly, society wives who used to enjoy a kitchen staff no longer had the money to employ them and began cooking for themselves. The instruction "stand facing the stove" was a bit more pragmatic than we realize. In 1936, the first commercial edition was published by Bobbs-Merrill. Marion Rombauer Becker, Irma's daughter, joined the Joy dynasty and revised and updated each subsequent edition until 1975. That edition was the first after Irma's death and was completely Marion's. Her son, Ethan Becker, has returned the book to the family's voice, revising the 1975 edition for the 75th Anniversary Edition.

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