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Joy of Cooking, Volume 2: Appetizers, Desserts and Baked Goods
     

Joy of Cooking, Volume 2: Appetizers, Desserts and Baked Goods

by Irma S. Rombauer, Marion R. Becker, Beverly Warner (Illustrator), Ginnie Hoffman (Illustrator), Marion Rombauer Becker
 

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Joy is the all-purpose cookbook. There are other basic cookbooks on the market, and there are fine specialty cookbooks, but no other cookbook includes such a complete range of recipes in every category: everyday, classic, foreign and de luxe. Joy is the one indispensable cookbook, a boon to the beginner, treasure for the experienced cook, the

Overview

Joy is the all-purpose cookbook. There are other basic cookbooks on the market, and there are fine specialty cookbooks, but no other cookbook includes such a complete range of recipes in every category: everyday, classic, foreign and de luxe. Joy is the one indispensable cookbook, a boon to the beginner, treasure for the experienced cook, the foundation of many a happy kitchen and many a happy home.

Privately printed in 1931, Joy has always been family affair, and like a family it has grown. Written by Irma Starkloff Rombauer, a St. Louisan, it was first tested and illustrated by her daughter, Marion Rombauer Becker, and subsequently it was revised and enlarged through Marion's efforts and those of her architect husband, John W. Becker. Their sons -- Ethan, with his Cordon Bleu and camping experiences, and Mark, with his interest in natural foods-have reinforced Joy in many ways.

Now over forty, Joy continues to be a family affair, demonstrating more than ever the awareness we all share in the growing preciousness of food. Special features in this edition are the chapter on Heat, which gives you many hints on maintaining the nutrients in the food you are cooking, and Know Your Ingredients, which reveals vital characteristics of the materials you commonly combine, telling how and why they react as they do; how to measure them; when feasible, how to substitute one for another; as well as amounts to buy. Wherever possible, information also appears at the point of use.

Divided into three parts, Foods We Eat, Foods We Heat and Foods We Keep, Joy now contains more than 4500 recipes, many hundreds of them new tothis edition -- the first full revision in twelve years. All the enduring favorites will still be found. In the chapter on Brunch, Lunch and Supper Dishes there are also interesting suggestions for using convenience and leftover foods. Through its more than 1000 practical, delightful drawings by Ginnie Hofmann and Ikki Matsumoto, Joy shows how to present food correctly and charmingly, from the simplest to the most formal service; how to prepare ingredients with classic tools and techniques; and how to preserve safely the results of your canning and freezing.

Joy grows with the times; it has a full roster of American and foreign dishes: Strudel, Zabaglione, Rijsttafel, Couscous, among many others. All the classic terms you find on menus, such as Provencale, bonne femme, meunière and Florentine, are not merely defined but fully explained so you yourself can confect the dish they characterize. Throughout the book the whys and wherefores of the directions are given, with special emphasis on that vital cooking factor -- heat. Did you know that even the temperature of an ingredient can make or mar your best-laid plans? Learn exactly what the results of simmering, blanching, roasting and braising have on your efforts. Read the enlarged discussion on herbs, spices and seasonings, and note that their use is included in suitable amounts in the recipes. No detail necessary to your success in cooking has been omitted.

Joy, we hope, will always remain essentially a family affair, as well as an enterprise in which its authors owe no obligation to anyone but to themselves and to you. Choose from our offerings what suits your person, your way of life, your pleasure -- and join us in the Joy of cooking.

Because of the infinite patience that has gone into the preparation of Joy of Cooking, the publishers offer it on a money-back guarantee. Without question there is no finer all-purpose cookbook.

Editorial Reviews

bn.com
America's most popular kitchen bible has been revised for the first time in more than 20 years. Much is still familiar -- the recipe structure, with ingredients listed as they are called for, has been left intact, for instance -- but there's plenty that's new. Concerns about healthy eating are reflected throughout the new Joy, but old-fashioned, fat-laden dishes aren't gone entirely -- there are still plenty of appealing recipes for pies, tarts, puddings, eggs, and meats that set cholesterol scales tipping. As in previous revisions, changing tastes in food and the widening influence of ethnic cuisines have caused the most major changes in Joy. This is the ideal book for beginners, and a great reference for experienced cooks to have on hand as well.
Publishers Weekly
Levy, one of the first female Conservative rabbis in the United States, offers perceptive prayers, personal stories, and some powerful thoughts on the efficacy of prayer in this heartfelt book. Remarkably, it is more directed toward blessing others than praying for oneself: in a particularly moving section, Levy encourages people to place their hands on their children's and parents' heads and pronounce blessings upon them. Although Levy draws primarily from Jewish traditions, these prayers will be welcomed by people of many faiths; in particular, those who are grieving will cherish Levy's lucid understanding of the depth of pain. This is not a simplistic, sound-bite prayer book, but a carefully considered manual for inviting God into every possible situation. (Aug. 25) Copyright 2003 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Following the latest edition by nearly a decade, this new take on a classic drops some of the trendy stuff introduced earlier and returns to good, old-fashioned cooking like casseroles and canning. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780451168252
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/01/1974
Pages:
640
Product dimensions:
4.34(w) x 6.82(h) x 1.06(d)

Read an Excerpt

This recipe can be found in Joy Of Cooking's Stuffing chapter.

BASIC BREAD STUFFING
8 to 10 cups

This and the bread stuffing recipes that follow yield enough to stuff a 14- to 17-pound turkey. Many of the variations yield enough for an additional small casserole of stuffing. To stuff an oven roaster or 6 to 8 rock Cornish hens, halve the recipes. For a larger turkey, increase all the ingredients by half. The optional egg makes the stuffing firm. If you prefer the bread to be moist, skip the toasting step.

Position a rack in the center of the oven. Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Toast until golden brown:

1 pound sliced firm white sandwich, French, or Italian bread, including crusts, cut into 1/2-inch cubes, or 10 cups lightly packed bread cubes

Turn into a large bowl. Heat in a large skillet over medium-high heat until the foam subsides:

4 to 8 tablespoons (1/2 to 1 stick) unsalted butter

Add and cook, stirring, until tender, about 5 minutes:

2 cups chopped onions 1 cup finely chopped celery

Remove from the heat and stir in:

1/4 to 1/2 cup minced fresh parsley
1 teaspoon dried sage, or 1 tablespoon minced fresh
1 teaspoon dried thyme, or 1 tablespoon minced fresh
I teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated or ground nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
Stir into the bread cubes and toss until well combined. Depending on how much butter you started with and how firm you want the stuffing, stir in, a little at a time, until the stuffing is lightly moist but not packed together:
1/3 to 1 cup chicken stock 1 to 2 large eggs, well beaten (optional)

Adjust the seasonings. To use as a stuffing, reheat just before spooning it into the bird(s). Or moisten with additional:

Stock and/or egg
and turn into a large, shallow buttered baking dish. Bake in a 350°F oven until the top has formed a crust and the stuffing is heated through, 25 to 40 minutes.

This information can be found in the Joy Of Cooking's Poultry chapter.

RULES FOR STUFFING BIRDS

1. Always stuff the bird just before roasting‹never ahead of time, which would give any harmful bacteria that might be present in the cavity ample time to breed.

2. Have the stuffing hot and pack it loosely in the body and neck cavities. The stuffing must reach a temperature of 160°F during roasting to ensure that any possible pathogens are killed. If it is cold and packed tightly into the bird, it will not heat to this point until long after the bird is cooked through.

3. You must close the cavities in order to keep the stuffing in place. The quickest and most efficient way to do this is by sewingthe cavities shut with a trussing needle and twine. If you do not own a trussing needle, secure the body cavity with small skewers and lacing (kits for this purpose are sold at kitchen shops) and close the neck cavity with toothpicks.

4. When the bird has cooked through, take the temperature of the stuffing by plunging the stem of the thermometer deep into the body cavity. If the stuffing has not yet reached 160°F, simply take the bird out of the oven, scoop the stuffing into a buttered casserole, and bake it in the hot oven while the bird stands before carving.

5. Finally, always take all the stuffing out of the cooked bird as soon as you begin to carve. Stuffing left inside a large turkey may remain warm for several hours, even if the bird is refrigerated, providing a perfect environment for bacterial growth.

Copyright © 1997 by Simon & Schuster Inc., The Joy of CookingTrust and the MRB Revocable Trust

Meet the Author

Written by Irma Rombauer, Joy of Cooking was first tested and illustrated by her daughter, Marion Rombauer Becker. Subsequently, it was revised and expanded through Marion's efforts and those of her husband, John Becker. Their son Ethan, with his Cordon Blue training and knowledge of American cooking, has added to this book in many important ways.

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