The Joy of Keeping Score: How Scoring the Game Has Influenced and Enhanced the History of Baseball

The Joy of Keeping Score: How Scoring the Game Has Influenced and Enhanced the History of Baseball

by Paul Dickson
     
 

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In this unique book, Paul Dickson celebrates one of the most unusual traditions in all of sports--the baseball scorecard. Within the history of the scorecard are some of baseballs greatest moments. From the first scorecard introduced in 1845, to the scoring system devised by direct-marketing genius L. L. Bean; from presidential scoring habits to batting titles decided

Overview

In this unique book, Paul Dickson celebrates one of the most unusual traditions in all of sports--the baseball scorecard. Within the history of the scorecard are some of baseballs greatest moments. From the first scorecard introduced in 1845, to the scoring system devised by direct-marketing genius L. L. Bean; from presidential scoring habits to batting titles decided by official scorers, to Phil Rizzutos inspired scoring symbol "WW," ("Wasnt Watching"), Dickson delights in his subject, offering unique insights and memorable anecdotes. Among the books many illustrations is a gallery of historic scorecards, including Don Larsens perfect game in the 1956 World Series, Babe Ruths famous "called" home run, and Cal Ripkens record-breaking 2,131st consecutive game.

In addition, Dickson provides basic and advanced scoring techniques for beginners and experts alike, a year-by-year timeline of rule changes, a guide to baseballs quirkiest statutes, stories of famous scoring blunders, and many more unexpected rewards. For those who keep or have kept score, this book will be an elixir. For those who havent, it will be a revelation. For baseball fans everywhere, it is a treasure.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Scorekeeping in baseball was inaugurated nationally in 1863 by Henry Chadwick, who also invented the box score. Dickson (Baseball's Greatest Quotations) here teaches the rudiments of scoring, including how the players are numbered, some of the obvious symbols (e.g., SB is a Stolen Base) and some of the less obvious (K is the universal mark for the Strikeout). He explains the nuances of scoring a ball game and how to read a box score, and profiles some of the celebrities who liked to score games (Dwight D. Eisenhower and Mrs. Calvin Coolidge, among others). We also see how it's done north of the border, from a Montreal Expos scorecard (a home run is un circuit); how the hot dog was invented; and how FDR introduced baseball lingo into politics. Dickson has written a testimonial to the joys of scoring that true ball fans will embrace. Photos. (June)
Wes Lukowsky
A singular rite of passage for young baseball fans is learning to keep score. When many attend their first games, they're too young or too distracted by the myriad sights and sound at the ballpark, but eventually they see the real fans around them scribbling away in those chipboard programs, and they want to join in. Keeping score is not only how baseball accumulates its mountain of statistics, it's also a way for fans to participate in the game while creating a personalized souvenir. Dickson, the author of "The Dickson Baseball Dictionary" (1989), provides anecdotes about scoring, instructions on how it's done, and a brief history of the arcane art. Along with instruction and entertainment, he makes the valid point that baseball's elaborate scoring system has enhanced the history of the game by providing a generally standardized way to gather statistics. Standardized, yes, but personal, too. Take Yankee broadcaster Phil Rizzuto, who introduced the unique notation "WW," which means "wasn't watching." Baseball fans young and old are certain to enjoy this book.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802718716
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
05/26/2009
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
128
Sales rank:
522,434
File size:
7 MB

Meet the Author

Paul Dickson is the author of The Hidden Language of Baseball, The Dickson Baseball Dictionary, Baseballs Greatest Quotations, and Baseball: The Presidents Game, among many others. He lives and keeps score in Garrett Park, Maryland.
Paul Dickson is the author of more than forty books, including The Joy of Keeping Score, The Dickson Baseball Dictionary, Baseballs Greatest Quotations, and Baseball: The Presidents Game. In addition to baseball, his specialties include Americana and language. He lives in Garrett Park, Maryland.

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