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Jubilee
     

Jubilee

4.0 1
by Harry Manx
 
Harry Manx is a kind of blues loner: He plays a unique East-meets-West blues that's more intellectual than the usual 12-bar jams. On Jubilee, he tries to be sociable by teaming up with jazz session guitarist Kevin Breit. And while their musical party is mostly a satisfying endeavor, it's too up and down to count as a joyous noise. In

Overview

Harry Manx is a kind of blues loner: He plays a unique East-meets-West blues that's more intellectual than the usual 12-bar jams. On Jubilee, he tries to be sociable by teaming up with jazz session guitarist Kevin Breit. And while their musical party is mostly a satisfying endeavor, it's too up and down to count as a joyous noise. In many cases, the album sounds much like a Manx solo outing. The down-and-out theme of "Weary and You Run," as well as Manx's Indian-influenced guitar sound, could have come from any of his albums. He plays slide guitar with the weight of the world in every note -- sorrow and seriousness penetrate every note. Breit's influence lightens the tone a bit, especially on the instrumental back and forth of "When Abbott Met Costello" and the upbeat and slightly off-kilter "No Particular Place to Be/Itchy Knees." His limited vocal range is evident on faster tempo songs, like "Funny Business," hinting that he might want to stick to what he knows best. In addition to originals, the duo takes on some interesting covers, to mixed results. Kudos are deserved for their version of the Doobie Brothers' "Taking It to the Streets," which sounds like Steely Dan and Ravi Shankar decided to jam together. Manx's seriousness adds another dimension to the light-hearted "Diving Duck Blues," one of the album's highlights. When he sings "If the river was whiskey and I was a diving duck, I'm going to swim to the bottom and you know I'm never, ever coming up," you wonder if he actually might do it. But they should have stopped before they got to Hendrix's "Voodoo Chile." They riff on an abstraction of the main hook, losing much of the soul of the song, and the cool tact they use, sucks the beauty from the original. A jubilee is a supposed to be a celebration of grand proportions, and this one doesn't make it out of the soiree stage. ~ Michael Gowan

Product Details

Release Date:
02/04/2003
Label:
Northern Blues
UPC:
0809509001422
catalogNumber:
20014
Rank:
309256

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Harry Manx   Primary Artist,Banjo,Harmonica,Electric Bass,Vocals,Tamboura,Slide Guitar,Shaker,national steel guitar,Mohan Vina
Kevin Breit   Organ,Bass,Mandolin,Electric Guitar,Cavaquinho,Slide Guitar,Mandola,Loops,Mandocello,bass pedals,national steel guitar,Banjolin,Guitorgan,Resonator,Guitar (Baritone)
David Travers-Smith   Tambourine,Tamboura,Shaker

Technical Credits

Sleepy John Estes   Composer
Michael McDonald   Composer
Jimi Hendrix   Composer
Ted Jensen   Engineer
Danny O'Keefe   Composer
Kevin Breit   Composer
David Travers-Smith   Producer,Engineer
Michael Wrycraft   Liner Notes,Executive Producer
Traditional   Composer
Harry Manx   Composer
Calvin VK Breit   Introduction

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Jubilee 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
ju·bi·la·tion - n. 1. - The act of rejoicing. - The condition or feeling of being jubilant. 2. - A celebration or other expression of joy. "Jubilee" by guitarists Harry Manx and Kevin Breit feels like no blues record I have ever listened to. In fact, it hardly feels bluesy at all. While there are blues inspired titles like "Diving Duck Blues" and "Good Time Charlie's Got the Blues" and standard blues chord progressions are present, the songs on this CD ring with the passion and joy two inspired guitarists feeding off each other's positive energies. There is a simplicity of sound thanks to the production of David Travers Smith that allows the interaction of Manx and Breit to really shine through. They play as though they can find beauty from every note and the results are stunning. The overall tone of the CD is bright and refreshing without being overly brash. There is a downtempo quality yet the songs still remain lively and spirited. Imagine the kind of music one might listen to at a sunny, summer folk festival or while sipping cappucino in a coffee bar. This is the perfect recording to spin while relaxing on a lazy Sunday afternoon.