Jude The Obscure

Jude The Obscure

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by Thomas Hardy
     
 

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Jude the Obscure, the last of Thomas Hardy's novels, began as a magazine serial and was first published in book form in 1895. The book was burned publicly by William Walsham How, Bishop of Wakefield, in that same year. Its hero, Jude Fawley, is a working-class young man who dreams of becoming a scholar. The other main character is his cousin, Sue Bridehead, who is…  See more details below

Overview

Jude the Obscure, the last of Thomas Hardy's novels, began as a magazine serial and was first published in book form in 1895. The book was burned publicly by William Walsham How, Bishop of Wakefield, in that same year. Its hero, Jude Fawley, is a working-class young man who dreams of becoming a scholar. The other main character is his cousin, Sue Bridehead, who is also his central love interest. Themes include class, scholarship, religion, marriage, and the modernisation of thought and society. Hardy began making notes for the story in 1887. - from Wikipedia

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012283306
Publisher:
McCarthy Press
Publication date:
02/18/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
329 KB

Meet the Author

Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was an English novelist and poet. While his works typically belong to the Naturalism movement, several poems display elements of the previous Romantic and Enlightenment periods of literature, such as his fascination with the supernatural.

While he regarded himself primarily as a poet who composed novels mainly for financial gain, during his lifetime he was much better known for his novels, such as Tess of the d'Urbervilles and Far from the Madding Crowd, which earned him a reputation as a great novelist. The bulk of his fictional works, initially published as serials in magazines, were set in the semi-fictional land of Wessex (based on the Dorchester region where he grew up) and explored tragic characters struggling against their passions and social circumstances.

Hardy's poetry, first published in his fifties, has come to be as well regarded as his novels and has had a significant influence over modern English poetry, especially after The Movement poets of the 1950s and 1960s cited Hardy as a major figure. - from Wikipedia

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Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
June 2, 1840
Date of Death:
January 11, 1928
Place of Birth:
Higher Brockhampon, Dorset, England
Place of Death:
Max Gate, Dorchester, England
Education:
Served as apprentice to architect James Hicks

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Jude the Obscure (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 54 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i thought that this book was excellent. it was very sad and almost depresing. in the begining i thought that it was rather dull but once i got into it it was very good. also on the back of the book it says 'ends in one of the most shocking scenes in literary history' i didnt know what could be so shocking. but there was something. it was diffinitely worth reading. although i feel that this book is not as good as Thomas Hardys other novel 'Tess' which it is supposed to be better than, it was stil an amazing book by an amazing author.
jane70 More than 1 year ago
There are some books you read where the story leaves you soon after it is put down. Jude and his story, is not one of these. His hopes, dreams, goals, disappointments, loves and heartbreak, stay with you forever. Hardy appears to have been a man who challenged the inequities of his time through his great literary talent. The social underpinnings of the times are intricately woven into the lives of the meticulously defined characters and we are witness to the fallout and impact of the injustices of the times. Greed, jealousy, nepotism, elitism, status, expectations and more, negatively impacted Jude's life......but wait.....are we still not impacted today by these very traits? While some positive changes in the way society manages our lives have been made since Hardy's times, Read the book to see if you think if we are free of barriers to hardwork bringing success for all strata's of today's society.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Jude the Obscure is one of the most depressing novels in all of literature. Although I don't dispute that literature, like other art forms, need not be merely entertainment, the emotions evoked from this book, while a testament to Hardy's skill, are not for everybody. An author selects his audience, just as much as readers select their authors (if not more so). If you are inclined towards uplifting literature, or even works which permit the existence of hope, this book is not for you.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was the first I had ever read of Hardy's works and I loved it. It is rich with imagery and contains clandestine symbolism throughout the entire work, Hardy paints a perfect nightmare.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Unrealized dreams, emotionally and spiritually tortured lovers, unimaginable grief. Thomas Hardy does a great job of telling this wonderfully tragic story without sending the reader into a state of depression. After reading dozens of classics, a stunning and unexpected story development is a pleasant surprise.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book to find out the big secret alluded to on the back cover. The novel is full of surprises and is very somber. It's a great read for anybody interested in the classics.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have always been a fan of the classics, and this is one of my favorites. It is a haunting story that never really leaves me. It is a sad, bleak story of an unfortunate man. I have always heard that you can achieve whatever you want in life if you work hard. I do believe that, but I also believe that some unlucky souls never get what they want out of life even if they've worked hard for it. This is the story of one of those people. It is a great, sad, bleak, haunting book, and I recommend it to anyone who enjoys the classics of literature.
Gino More than 1 year ago
All aboard the Feels Train! I'm not gong to give you a plot summary like many do, trying to convince you with the quality of the story. I'm just going to tell you that out of the almost twenty classic novels that I have read in my life, Jude the Obscure quickly crept up to the top, becoming my favorite over titles like Catch 22, Grapes of wrath, and Wuthering Heights. However, no matter how good it is, I don't recommend it if you are a sensitive person, or a teenager under 15 years old. Even though the last words of Arabella leaves you with a surprising satisfaction after enduring over 300 pages of suffering, it is the need to read all those pages and watching Jude go through so much, that will make the kind of people I just mentioned feel either down, or downright depressed. I'm 20, but kind of sensitive, and this book touched me. Every night after finish reading, I felt different emotions, mad when the Jude felt mad, happy when he felt so, but towards the last few parts, the feeling it left me with was very heavy and sad. I'm not saying this is bad, because if a book manages to do this to you, then it automatically becomes a master piece; however, this book is definitely going to mess with your feels, and not everyone enjoys that. If you are OK with that pick it up, if what I said sounds like too much, there are countless titles out there to try out. But still, this book deserves to be at the top, along with the best books ever written by man, because it is a marvel of the human intelligence. Thomas Hardy was a boss.
Catherine-E-Chapman More than 1 year ago
A Very Accessible Nineteenth Century Novel The most striking thing about ‘Jude the Obscure,’ as far as I’m concerned, is how very easy it was to read, compared with most novels of comparable length written in the Nineteenth Century. This is not to say it’s a ‘light’ read by any means – it’s pretty bleak – but very compelling. Also, the length of chapters is such that it’s an easy book to dip into at regular intervals; before sleeping, for instance. The morality in Jude is extreme, and Jude and Sue are unconventional characters. However, I found the story had resonance with modern life in its illustration of how individuals can pervert religion in order to interpret it in a way that is contrary to basic principles of humanity. I’d recommend reading ‘Jude the Obscure’ if you’ve enjoyed other Thomas Hardy novels but I’d also say it’s a book that’s worth reading if you just enjoy novels that explore complex emotional situations and contain interesting characters. If you wouldn’t normally read Nineteenth Century novels, I’d say have a go with this one as it’s rather modern in the moral questions it raises, despite the fact that its conclusion is necessarily mired in the social constraints of the Victorian times in which it is set.
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