JUDE THE OBSCURE

JUDE THE OBSCURE

4.1 54
by Thomas Hardy
     
 

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CONTENTS

PART FIRST
At Marygreen

PART SECOND
At Christminster

PART THIRD
At Melchester

PART FOURTH
At Shaston

PART FIFTH
At Aldbrickham and Elsewhere

PART SIXTH
At Christminster Again




Part First

AT…  See more details below

Overview

CONTENTS

PART FIRST
At Marygreen

PART SECOND
At Christminster

PART THIRD
At Melchester

PART FOURTH
At Shaston

PART FIFTH
At Aldbrickham and Elsewhere

PART SIXTH
At Christminster Again




Part First

AT MARYGREEN



"Yea, many there be that have run out of their wits for
women, and become servants for their sakes. Many also
have perished, have erred, and sinned, for women.... O
ye men, how can it be but women should be strong, seeing
they do thus?"--ESDRAS.


I


The schoolmaster was leaving the village, and everybody seemed sorry.
The miller at Cresscombe lent him the small white tilted cart and
horse to carry his goods to the city of his destination, about twenty
miles off, such a vehicle proving of quite sufficient size for the
departing teacher's effects. For the schoolhouse had been partly
furnished by the managers, and the only cumbersome article possessed
by the master, in addition to the packing-case of books, was a
cottage piano that he had bought at an auction during the year in
which he thought of learning instrumental music. But the enthusiasm
having waned he had never acquired any skill in playing, and the
purchased article had been a perpetual trouble to him ever since in
moving house.

The rector had gone away for the day, being a man who disliked the
sight of changes. He did not mean to return till the evening, when
the new school-teacher would have arrived and settled in, and
everything would be smooth again.

The blacksmith, the farm bailiff, and the schoolmaster himself were
standing in perplexed attitudes in the parlour before the instrument.
The master had remarked that even if he got it into the cart he
should not know what to do with it on his arrival at Christminster,
the city he was bound for, since he was only going into temporary
lodgings just at first.

A little boy of eleven, who had been thoughtfully assisting in the
packing, joined the group of men, and as they rubbed their chins he
spoke up, blushing at the sound of his own voice: "Aunt have got a
great fuel-house, and it could be put there, perhaps, till you've
found a place to settle in, sir."

"A proper good notion," said the blacksmith.

It was decided that a deputation should wait on the boy's aunt--an
old maiden resident--and ask her if she would house the piano till
Mr. Phillotson should send for it. The smith and the bailiff started
to see about the practicability of the suggested shelter, and the boy
and the schoolmaster were left standing alone.

"Sorry I am going, Jude?" asked the latter kindly.

Tears rose into the boy's eyes, for he was not among the regular day
scholars, who came unromantically close to the schoolmaster's life,
but one who had attended the night school only during the present
teacher's term of office. The regular scholars, if the truth must
be told, stood at the present moment afar off, like certain historic
disciples, indisposed to any enthusiastic volunteering of aid.

The boy awkwardly opened the book he held in his hand, which Mr.
Phillotson had bestowed on him as a parting gift, and admitted that
he was sorry.

"So am I," said Mr. Phillotson.

"Why do you go, sir?" asked the boy.

"Ah--that would be a long story. You wouldn't understand my reasons,
Jude. You will, perhaps, when you are older."

"I think I should now, sir."

"Well--don't speak of this everywhere. You know what a university
is, and a university degree? It is the necessary hallmark of a man
who wants to do anything in teaching. My scheme, or dream, is to be
a university graduate, and then to be ordained. By going to live at
Christminster, or near it, I shall be at headquarters, so to speak,
and if my scheme is practicable at all, I consider that being on the
spot will afford me a better chance of carrying it out than I should
have elsewhere."

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012363176
Publisher:
SAP
Publication date:
04/17/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
377 KB

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Jude the Obscure (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 54 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i thought that this book was excellent. it was very sad and almost depresing. in the begining i thought that it was rather dull but once i got into it it was very good. also on the back of the book it says 'ends in one of the most shocking scenes in literary history' i didnt know what could be so shocking. but there was something. it was diffinitely worth reading. although i feel that this book is not as good as Thomas Hardys other novel 'Tess' which it is supposed to be better than, it was stil an amazing book by an amazing author.
jane70 More than 1 year ago
There are some books you read where the story leaves you soon after it is put down. Jude and his story, is not one of these. His hopes, dreams, goals, disappointments, loves and heartbreak, stay with you forever. Hardy appears to have been a man who challenged the inequities of his time through his great literary talent. The social underpinnings of the times are intricately woven into the lives of the meticulously defined characters and we are witness to the fallout and impact of the injustices of the times. Greed, jealousy, nepotism, elitism, status, expectations and more, negatively impacted Jude's life......but wait.....are we still not impacted today by these very traits? While some positive changes in the way society manages our lives have been made since Hardy's times, Read the book to see if you think if we are free of barriers to hardwork bringing success for all strata's of today's society.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Jude the Obscure is one of the most depressing novels in all of literature. Although I don't dispute that literature, like other art forms, need not be merely entertainment, the emotions evoked from this book, while a testament to Hardy's skill, are not for everybody. An author selects his audience, just as much as readers select their authors (if not more so). If you are inclined towards uplifting literature, or even works which permit the existence of hope, this book is not for you.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was the first I had ever read of Hardy's works and I loved it. It is rich with imagery and contains clandestine symbolism throughout the entire work, Hardy paints a perfect nightmare.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Unrealized dreams, emotionally and spiritually tortured lovers, unimaginable grief. Thomas Hardy does a great job of telling this wonderfully tragic story without sending the reader into a state of depression. After reading dozens of classics, a stunning and unexpected story development is a pleasant surprise.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book to find out the big secret alluded to on the back cover. The novel is full of surprises and is very somber. It's a great read for anybody interested in the classics.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have always been a fan of the classics, and this is one of my favorites. It is a haunting story that never really leaves me. It is a sad, bleak story of an unfortunate man. I have always heard that you can achieve whatever you want in life if you work hard. I do believe that, but I also believe that some unlucky souls never get what they want out of life even if they've worked hard for it. This is the story of one of those people. It is a great, sad, bleak, haunting book, and I recommend it to anyone who enjoys the classics of literature.
Gino More than 1 year ago
All aboard the Feels Train! I'm not gong to give you a plot summary like many do, trying to convince you with the quality of the story. I'm just going to tell you that out of the almost twenty classic novels that I have read in my life, Jude the Obscure quickly crept up to the top, becoming my favorite over titles like Catch 22, Grapes of wrath, and Wuthering Heights. However, no matter how good it is, I don't recommend it if you are a sensitive person, or a teenager under 15 years old. Even though the last words of Arabella leaves you with a surprising satisfaction after enduring over 300 pages of suffering, it is the need to read all those pages and watching Jude go through so much, that will make the kind of people I just mentioned feel either down, or downright depressed. I'm 20, but kind of sensitive, and this book touched me. Every night after finish reading, I felt different emotions, mad when the Jude felt mad, happy when he felt so, but towards the last few parts, the feeling it left me with was very heavy and sad. I'm not saying this is bad, because if a book manages to do this to you, then it automatically becomes a master piece; however, this book is definitely going to mess with your feels, and not everyone enjoys that. If you are OK with that pick it up, if what I said sounds like too much, there are countless titles out there to try out. But still, this book deserves to be at the top, along with the best books ever written by man, because it is a marvel of the human intelligence. Thomas Hardy was a boss.
Catherine-E-Chapman More than 1 year ago
A Very Accessible Nineteenth Century Novel The most striking thing about ‘Jude the Obscure,’ as far as I’m concerned, is how very easy it was to read, compared with most novels of comparable length written in the Nineteenth Century. This is not to say it’s a ‘light’ read by any means – it’s pretty bleak – but very compelling. Also, the length of chapters is such that it’s an easy book to dip into at regular intervals; before sleeping, for instance. The morality in Jude is extreme, and Jude and Sue are unconventional characters. However, I found the story had resonance with modern life in its illustration of how individuals can pervert religion in order to interpret it in a way that is contrary to basic principles of humanity. I’d recommend reading ‘Jude the Obscure’ if you’ve enjoyed other Thomas Hardy novels but I’d also say it’s a book that’s worth reading if you just enjoy novels that explore complex emotional situations and contain interesting characters. If you wouldn’t normally read Nineteenth Century novels, I’d say have a go with this one as it’s rather modern in the moral questions it raises, despite the fact that its conclusion is necessarily mired in the social constraints of the Victorian times in which it is set.
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