Judging a Book By Its Lover

Judging a Book By Its Lover

3.0 5
by Lauren Leto
     
 

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Want to impress the hot stranger at the bar who asks for your take on Infinite Jest? Dying to shut up the blowhard in front of you who’s pontificating on Cormac McCarthy’s “recurring road narratives”? Having difficulty keeping Francine Prose and Annie Proulx straight?

For all those overwhelmed readers who need to get a firm

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Overview

Want to impress the hot stranger at the bar who asks for your take on Infinite Jest? Dying to shut up the blowhard in front of you who’s pontificating on Cormac McCarthy’s “recurring road narratives”? Having difficulty keeping Francine Prose and Annie Proulx straight?

For all those overwhelmed readers who need to get a firm grip on the relentless onslaught of must-read books to stay on top of the inevitable conversations that swirl around them, Lauren Leto’s Judging a Book by Its Lover is manna from literary heaven! A hilarious send-up of—and inspired homage to—the passionate and peculiar world of book culture, this guide to literary debate leaves no reader or author unscathed, at once adoring and skewering everyone from Jonathan Franzen to Ayn Rand to Dostoyevsky and the people who read them.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062070159
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
10/02/2012
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
288
File size:
552 KB

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Meet the Author

Lauren Leto dropped out of law school to start the popular humor blog “Texts from Last Night.” She co-authored the book Texts from Last Night: All the Texts No One Remembers Sending. She lives in Brooklyn.

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Judging a Book by Its Lover: A Field Guide to the Hearts and Minds of Readers Everywhere 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
KrittersRamblings More than 1 year ago
Check out the full review at Kritters Ramblings A piece of nonfiction work that is interesting for both a non reader and a super reader.  As a reader, I usually limit my reading to a few genres and current books, so I enjoyed reading this book as it clued me into books that I didn't read in college or years right after and it actually gave me a list of books that I am going to try to make time to read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ImaginaryReads More than 1 year ago
With plenty of wit and sarcasm to go around in this thought-provoking book, Lauren Leto attacks what we thought we knew about books. Remember Clifford the Big Red Dog? Apparently he has something to teach little kids, and it's not how to be a made scientist bent on creating big strangely colored dogs for all. It's not something most parents would want for their children. You remember that book everyone was talking about, oh, this many years ago? Lauren was paying attention, and now she's outting them for what they really mean to say. There's also advice for book lovers from how to deliver pickup lines to someone in a bookstore to cheating in book discussions, and innovative ways to show off your proud collection of books around the house. Yeah, after reading this book, I now know how to hit on a hot guy in the bookstore (or public library). Will I put it to use? Maybe if it's a friend I can laugh with later... or on my imaginary, hotter-than-life future book boyfriend who would never let me down. Still, you never know. This is not a book you should take (too) seriously (most of the time). You should read this prepared to laugh out loud at the snarky comments that Lauren makes in commenting on books, the industry, and those who love it--and the outrageous things book lovers will do to get a healthy dose of literature into their system, like taking a long train ride in a foreign country the day the last Harry Potter book is being released. (On the bright side, she got to finish it before her brother, who laughed when he found out she was going to be abroad when it was released and totally thought he was going to read it before her.) I now know to stick closely to my friends when I'm in a foreign country and they know where they're going and I don't, which is highly likely to happen. Do I recommend it? Yes, I do.
Andreat78 More than 1 year ago
Judging A Book By Its Lover is your one-stop shop for all topics regarding books and the people who love them. Author Lauren Leto offers snarky, usually spot-on, sometimes condescending and always funny observations on a wide-range of topics, including: •Bookshelf of the Vanities - bookshelf presentations & the people behind them. •Ten Rules for Bookstore Hookups •Rules of Book Club - ohhh, this was so snarky and she nailed it. •Fan Letter - snarky pleas to fans of writers such as Ayn Rand -YES!, Proust, and Vonnegut. •Your Moveable Feast - an imaginary scenario of a meal with Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald, among others. •How to Write Like Any Author - so snarky, and funny. •What Your Child Will Grow Up to Be.... - based on their favorite book, I think my kids will be okay. •Stereotyping People By Their Favorite Author - this section was very hit or miss, more miss in my opinion. Funny, though. •How to Fake It - a guide to faking your way through discussion of some of the most prolific books •A Gift Guide...-a guide to gift-giving for the important people in your life. I now know what to give my mother-in-law for Christmas. Hooray. •Twitter-Sized Reviews of Memoirs - funny, snarky tweets that review memoirs •Book Critic's Bag of Tricks - Watch out guys.This gave me tons of new, pretentious words for my reviews. •How to Succeed in Classifying Fiction - Gah, I still don't get it. Besides the fun commentary on books and readers, Leto offers heartfelt stories on the effect books have had on her life. She also gives a great argument for the importance of print books. Judging a Book By Its Lover was definitely a fun read for me. And you can bet I will be using it as a personal guide for future bookish judginess. Favorite Quote: "Loving young adult novels well past adolescence isn't a sign of stunted maturity or intelligence. The most important thing about reading is not the level of sophistication of the books on your shelf. There is no prerequisite reading regimen for being a bookworm." (pg. 8)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago