Julia Gillian (and the Dream of the Dog)

Julia Gillian (and the Dream of the Dog)

4.9 11
by Alison McGhee, Drazen Kozjan
     
 

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Sixth grade is proving to be less than dreamy: Julia Gillian's new homeroom teacher is serious about school work and has the class "controlling for variables." Julia Gillian has been paired for the Reading Extravaganza with Fergus Cannon, whose distaste for reading rivals her own. Worst of all, her beloved dog, Bigfoot, is getting old. Soon, Julia Gillian will…  See more details below

Overview

Sixth grade is proving to be less than dreamy: Julia Gillian's new homeroom teacher is serious about school work and has the class "controlling for variables." Julia Gillian has been paired for the Reading Extravaganza with Fergus Cannon, whose distaste for reading rivals her own. Worst of all, her beloved dog, Bigfoot, is getting old. Soon, Julia Gillian will learn that no matter how hard she tries to control for variables and keep her lifelong companion safe, she cannot prevent the inevitable. Luckily, her bounty of steadfast friends and family see her through the toughest time of her life.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Phyllis Kennemer
In this third book in the "Julia Gillian" series, Julia Gillian is in sixth grade and experiencing the traumas of beginning middle school. She fears the students in the upper classes and avoids using the restroom because it is in the eighth grade section of the building. Her third grade reading buddy does not like to read and she does not know how they will come up with a project for the Reading Buddy Extravaganza. Her biggest concern, however, is that Bigfoot, her lifelong dog companion, is suffering from heart failure and does not have long to live. Julia Gillian (her last name is always used) has a strong network of family, friends, and school staff, so when Bigfoot does die, she has a lot of support in her grieving process. Turns out her third-grade reading buddy is the best help of all. Numerous pen and ink drawings and text that is widely spaced on the page make this book accessible to reluctant readers in upper elementary and middle school grades. Reviewer: Phyllis Kennemer, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
Gr 4–6—In this third book in the series, Julia starts sixth grade. Referred to as "Sixlets," the new middle schoolers live in fear of the "Crazy Eights," two years their senior. Julia's teacher, Mr. Lamonte, says, "You are now middle schoolers…. Controlling for variables will help you manage your many new responsibilities. Let's all try to rise to the occasion, shall we?" Julia takes his "controlling for variables" suggestion to heart, even finding ways to avoid the scary third-floor bathroom where the eighth graders hang out. But, from her aging dog to her sullen, third-grade reading buddy to a (seemingly) hostile "Crazy Eight" nemesis, Julia soon learns that some things can't be controlled, no matter how hard you try. A classroom and family story told with an engaging rhythm and quiet humor, this novel has an urban setting and a cast of interesting personalities. Fairly large print, lots of conversation, and numerous cartoon drawings make it so accessible that even Julia's book-hating Reading Buddy could find it appealing. Fans of the series will certainly want to read this, but it's also a winner on its own.—Lauralyn Persson, Wilmette Public Library, IL
From the Publisher

Julia Gillian (and the Art of Knowing)
Minnesota Book Award Finalist
“McGhee’s book . . . …is exactly what kids this age are thinking about, and boys have been as crazy about [it] as girls.” —The Los Angeles Times

“[A] sensitively crafted tale filled with wisdom and humor.” —The Midwest Book Review

“Illustrations of Julia Gillian’s masks and super size St. Bernard add a whimsical note to the book.” —School Library Journal

Julia Gillian (and the Quest for Joy)

“McGhee’s . . . affectionate, humorous portrayal of Julia Gillian’s emotional state reveals a keen perception of elementary-school worries.” —The Horn Book

“Highly relatable.” —Publishers Weekly

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780545033510
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
07/01/2010
Series:
Julia Gillian Series
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
7.92(w) x 5.76(h) x 1.08(d)
Lexile:
810L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author


Alison McGhee is the author of numerous award-winning books for young readers and adults, including the New York Times bestseller, Someday, illustrated by Peter Reynolds. She lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota with her family. You can visit her at www.alisonmcghee.com.

Drazen Kojzan is the illustrator of several books for children, including Diary of a Fairy Godmother by Esmé Raji Codell, and How to Tame a Bully by Nancy Wilcox Richards. He lives in Ontario, Canada with his family. You can visit him at www.drazenkozjan.com.

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Julia Gillian (and the Dream of the Dog) 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved reading this book. I couldn't even put this marvelous and intriguing book down. My only complaint is there is only 3 books in the series. It is a book perfect for hiding under your pillow and reading late at night. it is one of those books you can read over and over again. i absulutly adored it.
Mom99 More than 1 year ago
This book is great. Very appropriate for children specially 5th graders. I read some of this to my daughter and she read some herself. I was excited to see it take place in Minnesota! As I was reading it I guessed from the lake mentioned it was in Minneapolis. This book is nicely written no foul language. Very highly recommend this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's one of my favorite books! I love it! You should totally read it!
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Julia Gillian is quite accomplished for a nine-year-old. Thus far she's mastered the art of making papier-mâché masks, spreading her gum evenly across her teeth, and knowing exactly what her dog, Bigfoot, is saying even though he doesn't speak "human." Though she hasn't yet conquered the claw machine at Bryant Hardware by grabbing the stuffed meerkat, Julia keeps her skills sharp every Friday and Sunday afternoon during her walks around the neighborhood with Bigfoot. By far and away though, Julia Gillian's greatest skill is the art of knowing. For instance: she knows what her mother's making for breakfast before entering the kitchen, she knows the newspaper is full of nothing but bad news, and thirty-six pages into her new green book from Quinn Booksellers, she *knows* the story isn't going to end well. Set in Minneapolis, JULIA GILLIAN (AND THE ART OF KNOWING) is a down-to-earth story featuring a precocious young girl's struggle figuring out how to deal with the unsettling realities life (sometimes) presents. A few people might object to Julia's lack of summertime playmates, especially living in a large city; having grown up an only child, though, I can attest to the challenges of ferreting out peers. Alison McGhee gives children an intelligent and determined central character dealing with relatable problems in an honest, straightforward narrative. I'm definitely setting this one aside to pass on to my nieces.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You should really read this book. She has a first name for a first name and a first name for a last name. Just like me. My name is Jocelyn Isabella. READ IT OR ELSE!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is very unusual in the way that the characters and ideas fit together. I was absorbed in the book and look forward to reading the next book but also was confused on the point.