Julian's Glorious Summer

Julian's Glorious Summer

3.6 3
by Ann Cameron, R. Ed. Cameron, Dora Leder
     
 

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Bicycles–shiny, whizzing, wobbly bicycles–scare Julian more than lions or tigers. But how can he tell that to his best friend, Gloria? She can already ride with no hands. So instead of telling the truth, Julian makes up a little fib. And he almost gets away with it–until his fib backfires and Julian finds himself in the biggest, most confounding

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Overview

Bicycles–shiny, whizzing, wobbly bicycles–scare Julian more than lions or tigers. But how can he tell that to his best friend, Gloria? She can already ride with no hands. So instead of telling the truth, Julian makes up a little fib. And he almost gets away with it–until his fib backfires and Julian finds himself in the biggest, most confounding fix ever.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Librarians wanting stories with black protagonists will especially welcome this."—Booklist.

"When his best friend, Gloria, gets a new bike, Julian (7) is dismayed: he doesn't want to learn to ride, because he's afraid of falling. In a satisfying conclusion, Julian gets his own bike as a reward for considerable labor, and then learns what fun it can be to ride. This is a perfectly constructed young reader, with neat turns in the plot, a loving family, and engaging dialogue."—(pointer) Kirkus.

“Cameron has done an excellent job of portraying children’s fears and their desire to hide them. . . . [A] superb choice for readers going from easy readers to chapter books.”–School Library Journal

Children's Literature - Michelle H. Martin
When Julian's neighbor and best friend, Gloria, gets a new bicycle, he feigns disinterest instead of admitting to her and to his parents that he is terrified of falling off. Instead, he lies to Gloria, telling her that his father is making him work "all day and all night" all summer, leaving no time for him to learn to ride. Unfortunately, Julian's father learns of the lie, which prompts Julian to dig himself in deeper and actually commit to working for his father every day of summer. Exhausted and sore from all of the chores, Julian finally admits to his mother that he dislikes bikes because of the possibility of falling off while learning to ride. When Julian's father runs out of chores for him, he rewards him with $10 . . . and a new bike. Now Julian must tell the truth and face his worst fears, although Gloria assures him that she will still be his best friend even if he decides to return the bike to the store. Ann Cameron's entertaining text coupled with Leder's whimsical pencil sketches make this continuing story of Julian worth reading, although Robert Papp's new cover illustrations are inconsistent with Leder's artwork inside the book. Early readers will enjoy the humor that results from Julian's attempts always to appear brave and knowledgeable.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4 Children are in for a treat with these two books. In The Chalk Box Kid, Gregory is dealing with several problems. His family has to move after his father has lost his job, and his unliked Uncle Max moves in with them and shares Gregory's room. Bulla has done an excellent job of making this story upbeat and interesting, and of bringing Gregory's hard-working blue-collar family to life. Gregory reacts to his upsets by drawing a fantastic garden out of chalk on the walls of an abandoned building. His imagination and artistic talents help him immediately, and later, when admired by others, help him to gain a better self image and work out his problems. Readers are sure to sympathize with Gregory and the changes in his life. Teachers are portrayed as compassionate and interested in their students' welfare. Outstanding characterization plus a poignant story make this a particularly strong selection. Cameron has captured the same atmosphere in Julian's Glorious Summer as she did in The Stories Julian Tells (Pantheon, 1981). Julian is pleased that summer has arriveduntil his best friend Gloria rides by on a new bicycle. His fear of falling prohibits him from learning to ride, and he doesn't want Gloria to know. Cameron has done an excellent job of portraying children's fears and their desire to hide them. In both stories, the authors have dealt effectively and positively with children in difficult situations, but who have the support of caring adults. Two superb choices for readers going from easy readers to chapter books. Zenata W. Pierre, Portland Public Schools, Oreg.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780394891170
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
09/28/1987
Series:
Stepping Stone Books Series
Pages:
64
Sales rank:
219,936
Product dimensions:
5.18(w) x 7.55(h) x 0.20(d)
Lexile:
480L (what's this?)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

Meet the Author

Ann Cameron is the bestselling author of many popular books for children, including Julian, Secret Agent; Julian, Dream Doctor; The Stories Julian Tells; More Stories Julian Tells; The Stories Huey Tells; and More Stories Huey Tells.

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Julian's Glorious Summer 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
ISBN 0394891171 - Any book that wins the Library of Congress Children's Book of the Year gets my attention and Julian's Glorious Summer took that prize in 1988. The lesson of Julian's story is one that all parents can appreciate. Julian's summer takes a nosedive from the beginning, when his best friend Gloria rides up on her bicycle. She thinks it's great - he thinks it's scary. Not that he's about to say that! Instead, when Gloria invites him over to her house, Julian claims that his father will be forcing him to work day and night for the entire summer. His lie snowballs and, perhaps worse, his father seems to think this is a good idea and puts Julian to work immediately. One day, however, the work runs out - it's payday and Julian is in for yet another surprise this summer. The back cover says Reading Level 2.8. This book is a nice way for a kid to learn how lying can backfire, but at the same time Julian ends up with quite a payoff for his lies, so the lesson can be a little vague and might merit further discussion. Julian's fear of riding a bike is not uncommon and might help your child face his or her own fear - of bikes or anything else. The illustrations, by Dora Leder, are black and white pencil sketches and the lack of the vibrant colors usually found in books for very young readers is a positive here, because they don't distract from the text but enhance it. Race is most certainly not an issue in this story, but it might be worth knowing for some that the characters are black (it's never said, just in the images). This might make the book even more appealing to black families who have, in my reading experience so far, been under-represented in childrens' books. Julian's summer is glorious, the book is all right and the messages in it are worthwhile. - AnnaLovesBooks
Guest More than 1 year ago
Julian is a fibber. Julian said he wants to work instead of play with Gloria because he¿s afraid to ride a bike. Gloria rides her bike by herself. Julian told Gloria that his dad made him work so he could not play with her. Julian told his dad he wants to work to save money for a racecar. I liked this book because it was fun to read because it was about kids riding bikes. I remember when I was afraid to ride my bike. If Julian had training wheels on his bike he wouldn¿t feel so worried because he wouldn¿t tip over because training wheels keep you up. He wouldn¿t be a fibber because he would be happy to ride a bike instead of telling a lot of fibs. I don¿t think that Gloria and Julian were best friends because when he said I want to work instead of play with you, it hurt her feelings. Risa 3rd grade
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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