Overview








Pyrrhus Press specializes in bringing books long out of date back to life, allowing today’s readers access to yesterday’s treasures.

Jacob Abbott was a well-known 19th century historian who wrote biographies on various leaders and famous individuals, including this one about Julius Caesar. Possibly the most important man of antiquity, and even all of history, was Julius Caesar. Alexander Hamilton, the famous American patriot, once remarked that “the greatest man who ...

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Julius Caesar

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Overview








Pyrrhus Press specializes in bringing books long out of date back to life, allowing today’s readers access to yesterday’s treasures.

Jacob Abbott was a well-known 19th century historian who wrote biographies on various leaders and famous individuals, including this one about Julius Caesar. Possibly the most important man of antiquity, and even all of history, was Julius Caesar. Alexander Hamilton, the famous American patriot, once remarked that “the greatest man who ever lived was Julius Caesar”. Such a tribute, coming from one of the Founding Fathers of the quintessential modern democracy in reference to a man who destroyed the Roman Republic, is testament to the enduring mark that Caesar left upon the world. The ultimate conqueror, statesman, dictator, visionary, and opportunist, during his time in power Caesar expanded the borders of Rome to almost twice their previous size, revolutionized the infrastructure of the Roman state, and destroyed the Roman Republic for good, leaving a line of emperors in its place. His legacy is so strong that his name has become, in many languages, synonymous with power: the Emperors of Austria and Germany bore the title Kaiser, and the Czars of Russia also owe the etymology of their title to Caesar. His name also crept further eastward out of Europe, even cropping up in Hindi and Urdu, where the term for “Emperor” is Kaisar.

Even in his time, Caesar was in many ways larger than life, and because of his legacy as virtual founder of the Roman Empire, much of what was written about – and by – him during his life and immediately after his assassination was politically motivated. His successor, Octavian Augustus, had a strong interest in ensuring that Caesar’s life be painted in a favorable light, while Caesar’s political enemies attempted to paint him as a corrupt, undemocratic dictator who was destroying the old order of the Republic. This makes it exceedingly difficult to separate historical fact from apocryphal interjection, as the writings of Cicero (a rival of Caesar’s) and the later biographies of Suetonius and Plutarch can be misleading. Nonetheless, along with Caesar’s De Bello Gallico, his famous notes on his campaign against the Gauls, they remain our chief sources for Caesar’s life – a life everyone agreed was nothing short of remarkable and changed the course of history forever.







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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9783736810600
  • Publisher: BookRix
  • Publication date: 5/11/2014
  • Sold by: Readbox
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 204
  • File size: 432 KB

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! life to power. Government of Bone Chapter III. Advancement To The Consulship. FROM this time, which was about sixty- seven years before the birth of Christ, Caesar remained for nine years generally at Rome, en gaged there in a constant struggle for power. He was successful in these efforts, rising all the time from one position of influence and honor to another, until he became altogether the most prominent and powerful man in the city. A great many incidents are recorded, as attending these contests, which illustrate in a very striking manner the strange mixture of rude violence and legal formality by vhich Rome was in those days governed. Many of the most important offices of the state depended upon the votes of the people; and as the people had very little opportunity to become acquainted with the real merits of the case in respect to questions of government, they gave their votes very much according to the personal popularity of the candidate. Public men had very little moral principle in those Bribery ftnd corruption. Public uniuemefcta. days, and they would accordingly resort to any means whatever to procure this personal popularity. They who wanted office were accustomed to bribe influential men among the people to support them, sometimes by promising them subordinate offices, and sometimes by the direct donation of sums of money ; and they would try to please the mass of the people, who were too numerous to be paid with offices or with gold, by shows and spectacles, and entertainments of every kind which they would provide for theii amusement. This practice seems to us very absurd; and we wonder that the Roman people should tolerate it, since it is evident that the meansfor defraying these expenses must come, ultimately, in some way or other, from them...
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