Julius Caesar (Sourcebooks Shakespeare Series)

( 79 )

Overview

Experience the Ides of March like never before through our edition of Julius Caesar, with more than 60 minutes of audio on the CD including key scenes and excerpts from great performances past and present.

IN THE BOOK:
Photographs from notable productions including:
-the 1953 movie by Joseph L. Mankiewicz ...

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Julius Caesar

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Overview

Experience the Ides of March like never before through our edition of Julius Caesar, with more than 60 minutes of audio on the CD including key scenes and excerpts from great performances past and present.

IN THE BOOK:
Photographs from notable productions including:
-the 1953 movie by Joseph L. Mankiewicz starring Marlon Brando as Mark Antony, James Mason as Brutus and John Gielgud as Cassius
-contemporary American productions with Morgan Freeman as Casca, Al Pacino as Mark Antony and Martin Sheen as Brutus

HEAR 30 GREAT SCENES ON AUDIO CD
-Herbert Beerbohm Tree from 1906
-the landmark Mercury Theatre production from 1938 starring Orson Welles
-modern scenes starring Richard Dreyfuss, Stacey Keach and Adrian Lester

NARRATED BY SIR DEREK JACOBI

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402206870
  • Publisher: Sourcebooks, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 5/1/2006
  • Series: Sourcebooks Shakespeare Series
  • Edition description: BOOK & CD
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 1.03 (d)

Meet the Author

TEXT EDITORS
Robert Ormsby received his PhD from the University of Toronto in 2005. Besides essays on Canadian performances of classical drama (Toronto Slavic Quarterly, May, 2003; Shakespeare Bulletin, Summer 2004), his publications include Descriptive Entries of Folger Library collection prompt-books for Coriolanus productions by John Philip Kemble, Samuel Phelps, and Henry Irving (The Shakespeare Collection) and a review of Shakespeare and the Force of Modern Performance by W.B. Worthen. (Renaissance Quarterly, Summer 2004).

SERIES EDITORS
Marie Macaisa spent twenty years in her first career: high tech. She has a BS in computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a MS in artificial intelligence from the University of Pennsylvania. She edited the first two books in the series, Romeo and Juliet and Othello, contributed the "Cast Speaks" essays, and is currently at work on the next set.

Dominique Raccah is the founder, president and publisher of Sourcebooks. Born in Paris, France, she has a bachelor's degree in psychology and a master's in quantitative psychology from the University of Illinois. She also serves as series editor of Poetry Speaks and Poetry Speaks to Children.

ADVISORY BOARD
David Bevington is the Phyllis Fay Horton Distinguished Service Professor in the Humanities at the University of Chicago. A renowned text scholar, he has edited several Shakespeare editions including the Bantam Shakespeare in individual paperback volumes, The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Longman, 2003), and Troilus and Cressida (Arden, 1998). He teaches courses in Shakespeare, Renaissance Drama and Medieval Drama.

Peter Holland is the McMeel Family Chair in Shakespeare Studies at the University of Notre Dame. One of the central figures in performance-oriented Shakespeare criticism, he has also edited many Shakespeare plays, including A Midsummer Night's Dream for the Oxford Shakespeare series. He is also general editor of Shakespeare Survey and co-general editor (with Stanley Wells) of Oxford Shakespeare Topics. Currently he is completing a book, Shakespeare on Film, and editing Coriolanus for the Arden 3rd series.

ESSAYISTS
Thomas Garvey has been acting, directing, or writing about Shakespeare for over two decades. A graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he studied acting and directing with the MIT Shakespeare Ensemble, where he played Hamlet, Jacques, Iago, and other roles, and directed All's Well The Ends Well and Twelfth Night. He has since directed and designed serveral other Shakespearean productions, as well as works by Chekov, Ibsen, Sophocles, Beckett, Moliere, and Shaw. Mr. Garvey currently writes on theatre for the Boston Globe and other publications.

SERIES EDITORS
Marie Macaisa spent twenty years in her first career: high tech. She has a BS in computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a MS in artificial intelligence from the University of Pennsylvania. She edited the first two books in the series, Romeo and Juliet and Othello, contributed the "Cast Speaks" essays, and is currently at work on the next set.

Dominique Raccah is the founder, president and publisher of Sourcebooks. Born in Paris, France, she has a bachelor's degree in psychology and a master's in quantitative psychology from the University of Illinois. She also serves as series editor of Poetry Speaks and Poetry Speaks to Children.

ADVISORY BOARD
David Bevington is the Phyllis Fay Horton Distinguished Service Professor in the Humanities at the University of Chicago. A renowned text scholar, he has edited several Shakespeare editions including the Bantam Shakespeare in individual paperback volumes, The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Longman, 2003), and Troilus and Cressida (Arden, 1998). He teaches courses in Shakespeare, Renaissance Drama and Medieval Drama.

Peter Holland is the McMeel Family Chair in Shakespeare Studies at the University of Notre Dame. One of the central figures in performance-oriented Shakespeare criticism, he has also edited many Shakespeare plays, including A Midsummer Night's Dream for the Oxford Shakespeare series. He is also general editor of Shakespeare Survey and co-general editor (with Stanley Wells) of Oxford Shakespeare Topics. Currently he is completing a book, Shakespeare on Film, and editing Coriolanus for the Arden 3rd series.

ESSAYISTS
Thomas Garvey has been acting, directing, or writing about Shakespeare for over two decades. A graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he studied acting and directing with the MIT Shakespeare Ensemble, where he played Hamlet, Jacques, Iago, and other roles, and directed All's Well The Ends Well and Twelfth Night. He has since directed and designed several other Shakespearean productions, as well as works by Chekov, Ibsen, Sophocles, Beckett, Moliere, and Shaw. Mr. Garvey currently writes on theatre for the Boston Globe and other publications.

Jeffrey Horowitz is the founder and artistic director of Theatre for a New Audience (TFANA) in New York City. Founded in 1979, TFANA's mission is to help develop and vitalize the performance and study of Shakespeare and classic drama. TFANA's productions and artists have been recognized with many awards and nominations, including the Lortel, Drama Desk, Drama League, OBIE, and Tony. In 2001, TFANA became the first US theatre to be invited to bring a production of Shakespeare to the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC). TFANA toured Cymbeline (directed by Bartlett Sher) to Stratford-upon-Avon, and in 2007, their Merchant of Venice featuring F. Murray Abraham will be featured as part of the RSC's Complete Works festival.

Douglas Lanier is an associate professor of English at the University of New Hamsphire. He has written many essays on Shakepeare in popular culture, including "Shakescorp Noir" in Shakespeare Quarterly 53.2 (Summer 2002) and "Shakespeare on the Record" in The Blackwell Companion to Shakespeare in Performance (edited by Barbara Hodgdon and William Worthen, Blackwell, 2005). His book Shakespeare and Modern Popular Culture (Oxford University Press) was published in 2002. He is currently working on a book-length study of cultural stratification in early modern British theater.

Andrew Wade was head of voice for the Royal Shakespeare Company from 1990 to 2003 and voice assistant director from 1987 to 1990. During this time he worked on 170 productions and with more than 80 directors. Along with Cicely Berry, Andrew recorded Working Shakespeare and the DVD series Voice and Shakespeare, and he was the verse consultant for the movie Shakespeare In Love. In 2000, he won a Bronze Award from the New York International Radio Festival for the series Lifespan, which he co-directed and devised. He works widely teaching, lecturing an coaching throughout the world.

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Table of Contents

Contents

About Sourcebooks MediaFusion
About the Text
On the CD
Featured Audio Productions
Note from the Series Editors

In Production: Julius Caesar through the Years by Robert Ormsyby

As Performed: By Theatre for a New Audience at the Lucille Lortel
Theatre in New York City in 2003
by Jeffrey Horowitz

"O, What a Fall Was There, My Countrymen!": Julius Caesar in Popular Culture by Douglas Lanier

JULIUS CAESAR BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

The Cast Speaks: The Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey's 2005 Cast by Marie Macaisa

A Voice Coach's Perspective on Shakespeare: Keeping Shakespeare Practical by Andrew Wade

In the Age of Shakespeare by Thomas Garvey

About the Online Teaching Resources
Acknowledgments
Audio Credits
Photo Credits
About the Contributors

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 79 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(26)

4 Star

(30)

3 Star

(13)

2 Star

(9)

1 Star

(1)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 79 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 13, 2010

    A Great Edition for High School Students

    As an experienced high school English teacher, I always advise my students and their parents to purchase a Folger's edition of Shakespeare's plays. The notes, summaries, and other commentary serve the novice Shakespearean reader well and make the classical allusions and denotations of unfamiliar and common words and phrases from the Elizabethan age much easier for 21st Century readers to understand.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2007

    'The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves...'

    First of all, this is by far my favorite Shakespeare play however, I object to one aspect of it. Wait a moment, Shakepeare fans! Refrain from biting your thumbs at me until you know the nature of my complaint. The play is entitled Julius Caesar, but I do not think that the play was about Caesar. Yes, it was about his Rome. Yes, he was about to be made king. Yes, it is he who is killed. On the contrary, the play mainly centers around Brutus that is why I could not put the book down until I had finished it (in one sitting, yes). It was the tragedy of noble Brutus, not the assasination of Caesar, that captivated me. Idealistic at best, Brutus's oratory in which he said he loved Rome more than his beloved Caesar was one of those chilling moments in literature that reminds us why readers read and why writers write. Then, another gem, Cassius's famous line (above) is more true than we give it credit, especially in the United States. In short, 'Beware the ides of March!'

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 18, 2010

    Caesar's best read...

    Whether for High School drama class or actor's study, Arden is always the first one to look at when preparing for a role. The Folio and modern spellings are listed with their meanings and the Bard's source material is often shown, in this case, Plutarch. I will recommend Arden for any play to research.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 21, 2009

    Actually makes Shakespeare enjoyable

    In high school we had to read Romeo and Juliet and the emphasis of the teacher was to just about memorize the play.

    Didn't enjoy Shakespeare in high school but picked up some of the Shakespeare plays published by Barnes & Noble and to my surprise have read Juliet Caesar as well as The Merchant of Venice and found them not just easy reading but enjoyable. Have now picked up Othello, King Lear and Macbeth so if you are interested in reading Shakespeare without problems or have to read for a class would definitely recommend the Barnes & Noble publications.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2003

    Spell-binding play!

    One of Shakespeare's best plays! The plot and the story is captivating and even more engrossing because of the historical fact behind it. You see Caesar's assasination in a new light in a simple to read, short play!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 17, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Not my favorite, but a good play.

    This year I was required to read Julius Caesar with my honors English class. Initially, I had no desire to read it because the version we read in middle school was extremely boring. 3 years later, however, and I was able to understand the play much more easily than I did when I was younger. There were a lot of themes in the play that are still applicable today and the story was pretty interesting. I found Shakespeare's Romeo & Juliet much more intriguing when I read it last year, but Julius Caesar was close in rank. My biggest problem was keeping all of the characters whose names started with a C straight. Since the play was written in an older modern English, some of the phrases and lines (well, most of them, to tell the truth) were extremely hard to decipher. I dislike this because it's difficult to understand not only what the characters were saying, but what they meant when they said it. I probably would not read this again, because I honestly don't like Shakespeare's works. I've been introduced to many, and while this one was decent, I just haven't been able to appreciate his writings.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 30, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Honorable

    Julius Caesar is surprisingly easy enough to read even with the old English, and there is so much that underlies each and every word. Shakespeare certainly sets a fine example of what is needed in a good script. By using such eloquently intense words alone, he spins a silk web around the reader, hypnotically playing the scenes before one's eyes. Stripped down, the plot focuses on Brutus and Antony and their separate ideals for the one woman they both love: Rome.
    "The sun of Rome is set! Our day is gone;
    Clouds, dews, and dangers come; our deeds are done!"

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2007

    Loved The Book

    Interesting read,I found this book to make one think about life.Very good book!

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2007

    A reviewer

    I've read several of William Shakespeare's plays and I have to say that I was deffinently disappointed with this one. It was somewhat confusing and it was really boring. I would never recommend this play to anyone.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2007

    I love Shakesphere and all but....

    ...this had to be one of the worst books/plays I have ever read. It was soooo dumb, and I think it dumb that Brutus killed himself for feeling guilty about murdering Caesar. He should have thought about the murder a little more throughly before doing it, then he wouldn't have to commit suicide about feeling guilty. All and all, don't waste your time on this book unless you're a Shakesphere nut, or absolutely positively HAVE TO read it for class!

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2004

    An Astounding Tragedy

    William Shakespare's story of Julius Caesar, is truely a sententious work of irony and tragedy.It specifically elucidates the essential device of tragedy that the rancorous conspiracy is cast into reluctant perdition.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2003

    ....

    I had to read it for my honors English class, and I, who personally loves reading, hated this book. It was boring to me.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2002

    Great play

    I highly recommend reading Julius Caesar because Shakespeare was a brilliant writer whose timeless plays are rarely surmounted. It is definitely a classic and a must-read.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2001

    Mainly about Brutus?!

    I have to admit that Julius Caesar is a really good play. It has so much meaning under it and actually made sense to me! It seems like it was more about Brutus and his problems with conspiring against his good friend Caesar than Caesar himself. Brutus was just an idealist who did everything for his love of Rome and simply made bad decisions. 'Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more.' EXCELLENT PLAY! BRAVO!!!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2001

    good book read it

    Julius Caeser was a good book.I liked it because it was like a mystery type book.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 28, 2014

    The tragic, historical drama Julius Caesar, written by William S

    The tragic, historical drama Julius Caesar, written by William Shakespeare in 1599 as a way to safely comment on the political turmoil in England at the time, tells the story of the events surrounding the assassination of Julius Caesar, including its consequences and causes. Brutus' role in the act and its effects on him are also explored as he tries to decide what is best for the Republic. The involvement and motivations of several other pivotal Romans are included as well.
    The conflict between loyalty to people and loyalty to principles is central to the play. Persuasion and rhetoric are also very important, as are Fate and free-will. Idealism vs realism is also a big part of the story, as it is the main difference between Brutus and Antony and Octavian. 
    The play is interesting, especially for those who are interested in history. The fact that neither side is really wrong or right helps make the story thought-provoking, as is the fact that the play has no villains. Unfortunately, because most of the major details of the plot are common knowledge, most readers will never be surprised by anything that happens. Despite this, I still found the play interesting. It can be an informative source of information for readers who do not know much about that period.
    I think that the play excluded background information, such as the dire state of the Republic at the time, which would have helped the reader better understand points of view of the Conspirators and Caesar's followers. I also think that some of the characters could have been better portrayed, specifically Antony and that his complicated relationship with Octavian could have been included.
    The play didn't affect me much or change my opinions on the topic because I have studied the events that the play is based on in great detail prior to reading the play. This play was my second favorite of Shakespeare’s that I have read so far.

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  • Posted March 24, 2013

    Another Book by Shakespeare

    Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare is the tragedy of Julius Caesar and Marcus Brutus. This was Shakespeare's transition from history plays to his famous tragedies. Overall, it is just another Shakespeare book, difficult to understand, but having a nice story when looking back on it. Not awful, but not the best

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2013

    All Hail Shakespeare!!!

    Best play written by him, EVER!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2012

    Great play

    Oh ceezah reaf mine first for mines a suit that touches ceezah neeerah read it great ceezah!

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  • Posted December 14, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    A Classic Must-Read Story of Friendship, Greed, and Vengeance.

    Shakespeare uses fascinating historical evidence to fuel his fanciful twists on the original story of the great Roman leader, Julius Caesar. This play tells of the cunning Cassius and naive Brutus who plot to overthrow Caesar. After the assassination, the traitors face the challenge of dealing with Caesar's devoted friend, Mark Antony. Reading this play is something everyone should do at some point in his life; the references to it are endless (Et tu Brute?, Beware the Ides of March, etc.) and Shakespeare weaves an intricate web of foreshadowing and deception. Though the Elizabethan English is often discouraging, time spent deciphering passages pays off in the learning of new vocabulary and providing insight into both the world of Roman and Elizabethan culture. I highly recommend reading this to whomever doesn't mind taking time to experience a great piece of literature.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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