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June and August
     

June and August

5.0 1
by Vivian Walsh, Adam McCauley (Illustrator)
 

This imaginative story explores the concept that the greatest friendships can come to be if you are willing to overlook differences.
 
Vivian Walsh is the co-creator of several bestselling books for children. In June and August she once again makes a misunderstanding the humorous but pivotal moment that brings together two very unlikely friends. One

Overview

This imaginative story explores the concept that the greatest friendships can come to be if you are willing to overlook differences.
 
Vivian Walsh is the co-creator of several bestselling books for children. In June and August she once again makes a misunderstanding the humorous but pivotal moment that brings together two very unlikely friends. One night in the jungle, June is thrilled to see a shooting star, while August loves looking at the moon. Although they can’t see each other in the dark, the two promise to meet again the next day. But when morning dawns, they face a dilemma. How are June and August going to recognize each other?

F&P level: K

F&P genre: F

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
June and August meet under bright stars one night, happy to share their enjoyment of the moon and stars. They agree to meet the next day. But since it is too dark to see, they wonder how they will recognize each other. "I am very handsome," is August's note. June replies that she is very clever. In daylight we readers note that August, a very large elephant, cannot decide which clever creature is June. She turns out to be a snake, who cannot see anyone "handsome." August waits patiently, but June complains, and he hears her. Their encounter shocks them both. But then they decide, as they see their shadows, that they are indeed very different, but only in the middle. As they move together through the jungle, they feel GRAND. That night, they enjoy the sky again together, strange friends but friends nevertheless. McCauley uses scratchboard, colored pencil, and gouache with considerable inventiveness to create the animal characters in their jungle. The illustration on the jacket/cover presents the title characters in ambivalent black silhouettes, with parts of other animals peering through the title. They meet on double pages beneath a dazzling sky and find each other as friends before realizing their differences. There is humor in their story, but also a lesson on the basis of friendship. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3—June is a snake and August an elephant, but this is not immediately apparent to them. On the dark night when they first meet, their physical differences are obscured and they are drawn together by their dreams of what they'd do if they could travel into space. When they meet again in daylight, they continue to bond and to dream together. This odd story has a quirky charm. The story line is disjointed, not because of a lack of storytelling skill, but as a deliberate style that produces a sense of surrealism. The playful illustrations are full of visual tricks that pair the snake with the elephant's trunk, or pointy blades of grass with rhinoceros horns. Readers may be intrigued or they may be befuddled, but they likely won't be bored by this unusual take on friendship and individuality.—Heidi Estrin, Feldman Children's Library at Congregation B'nai Israel, Boca Raton, FL
Kirkus Reviews
In this tongue-in-cheek take on the tried-and-true theme of unlikely friendships, a python meets what she thinks is another python one night. June and August hit it off immediately, and not even the daytime revelation that June has been talking to an elephant's trunk puts a damper on their relationship. Caring little that all the other animals are staring, the two bond more closely by cavorting through the jungle all day, then climbing a hill with June atop August's back to admire the Moon and stars together. Using very thinly applied color to give his flat-perspective scratchboard-and-gouache scenes a distinctive, speckled look, McCauley depicts the smitten pair with large, expressive eyes, and adds quirky details-June, for instance, wears a wristwatch, and August a decorative blanket-to reflect the tale's urbane language ("June thought August looked stunning") and sensibility. (Picture book. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780810984103
Publisher:
Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Publication date:
09/01/2009
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.80(w) x 11.20(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
5 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Vivian Walsh lives with her three children in San Francisco, California. She is the co-creator of several bestselling books, including Olive, the Other Reindeer. Visit her Web site at www.vivianwalsh.com. Adam McCauley also lives in San Francisco. He has illustrated a number of books for children, including the Time Warp Trio series, by Jon Scieszka, and The Monsterologist, by Bobbi Katz. Visit his Web site at www.adammccauley.com.

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June and August 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
MenaW More than 1 year ago
Thoughtful and beautiful an ideal night time read to launch a young mind into the dream world.