The Jungle Books

( 203 )

Overview

The Jungle Books can be regarded as classic stories told by an adult to children. But they also constitute a complex literary work of art in which the whole of Kipling's philosophy of life is expressed in miniature. They are best known for the 'Mowgli' stories; the tale of a baby abandoned and brought up by wolves, educated in the ways and secrets of the jungle by Kaa the python, Baloo the bear, and Bagheera the black panther. The stories, a mixture of fantasy, myth, and magic, are underpinned by Kipling's ...
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Overview

The Jungle Books can be regarded as classic stories told by an adult to children. But they also constitute a complex literary work of art in which the whole of Kipling's philosophy of life is expressed in miniature. They are best known for the 'Mowgli' stories; the tale of a baby abandoned and brought up by wolves, educated in the ways and secrets of the jungle by Kaa the python, Baloo the bear, and Bagheera the black panther. The stories, a mixture of fantasy, myth, and magic, are underpinned by Kipling's abiding preoccupation with the theme of self-discovery, and the nature of the 'Law'.

Selected stories from Kipling's two "Jungle Books" chronicle the adventures of Mowgli, the boy reared by a pack of wolves in an Indian jungle. Also includes "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi."

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 3-6-- With over 20 editions in print, what would justify publishing, or purchasing, another Jungle Book ? The answer is clearly Alexander's splendid and technically ravishing watercolor illustrations. Their stylized borders and overall background patterns recall--without slavishly imitating--Indian textiles and Indian book illustrations. The stunningly vibrant hues especially the hot pinks, oranges, and electric blues allude to the traditional colors of India but appeal to contemporary tastes for high-voltage tints. The details are evocative but spare their scale makes the human figures unintelligible at a distance, but the many animal portraits maintain their effect across a room. With the recent reappearance of the Disney version in video and cartoon knockoffs, this edition's fine graphic vision is doubly welcome. In these numerous vignettes per double-page depictions, India is again the rich and exotic country of Kipling's romantic creation. --Patricia Dooley, University of Washington, Seattle
Sally Estes
In 18 rich watercolor paintings, Pinkney captures the sheer drama of the eight Mowgli stories and of the well-loved "Rikki-tikki-tavi." A handsome volume for collections of classic tales.
From the Publisher
"The incantatory text of Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book still rewards reading aloud."
Sunday Times

"The child who has never run with Mowgli's wolf pack... has missed something that he will not get from any other writer."
— Rosemary Sutcliffe

"As a child I loved The Jungle Books... If you want to look at the India of Kipling's time, there is no writer who will give it to you better."
— Salman Rushdie

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780451419187
  • Publisher: Signet Classics
  • Publication date: 8/6/2013
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 1,427,220
  • Product dimensions: 4.25 (w) x 6.88 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Rudyard Kipling was born in Bombay in 1865. During his time at the United Services College, he began to write poetry, privately publishing Schoolboy Lyrics in 1881. The following year he started work as a journalist in India, and while there produced a body of work, stories, sketches, and poems —including “Mandalay,” “Gunga Din,” and “Danny Deever”—which made him an instant literary celebrity when he returned to England in 1889. While living in Vermont with his wife, an American, Kipling wrote The Jungle Books, Just So Stories, and Kim—which became widely regarded as his greatest long work, putting him high among the chronicles of British expansion. Kipling returned to England in 1902, but he continued to travel widely and write, though he never enjoyed the literary esteem of his early years. In 1907, he became the first British writer to be awarded the Nobel Prize. He died in 1936

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Read an Excerpt

Mowg1i's Brothers

Now Chil the Kite brings home the night
That Mang the Bat sets free --
The herds are shut in byre and hut
For loosed till dawn are we.
This is the hour of pride and power,
Talon and tush and claw.
Oh, hear the call! -- Good hunting all
That keep the jungle Law!
Night Song in the Jungle

It was seven o'clock of a very warm evening in the Seeonee Hills when Father Wolf woke up from his day's rest, scratched himself, yawned, and spread out his paws one after the other to get rid of the sleepy feeling in their tips. Mother Wolf lay with her big gray nose dropped across her four tumbling, squealing cubs, and the moon shone into the mouth of the cave where they all lived. "Augrh!" said Father Wolf, "it is time to hunt again." And he was going to spring downhill when a little shadow with a bushy tail crossed the threshold and whined: "Good luck go with you, 0 Chief of the Wolves; and good luck and strong white teeth go with the noble children, that they may never forget the hungry in this world. "

It was the jackal -- Tabaqui the Dish-licker -- and the wolves of India despise Tabaqui because he runs about making mischief, and telling tales, and eating rags and pieces of leather from the village rubbish heaps. But they are afraid of him too, because Tabaqui, more than anyone else in the jungle, is apt to go mad, and then he forgets that he was ever afraid of anyone, and runs through the forest biting everything in his way. Even the tiger runs and hides when little Tabaqui goes mad, for madness is the most disgraceful thing that can overtake a wild creature. We call it hydrophobia,but they call it dewanee -- the madness -- and run.

"Enter, then, and look," said Father Wolf, stiffly, "but there is no food here."

"For a wolf, no," said Tabaqui, "but for so mean a person as myself a dry bone is a good feast. Who are we, the Gidur-log [the Jackal-People], to pick and choose?" He scuttled to the back of the cave, where he found the bone of a buck with some meat on it, and sat cracking the end merrily.

"All thanks for this good meal," he said, licking his lips. "How beautiful are the noble children! How large are their eyes! And so young too! Indeed, indeed, I might have remembered that the children of kings are men from the beginning."

Now, Tabaqui knew as well as anyone else that there is nothing so unlucky as to compliment children to their faces; and it pleased him to see Mother and Father Wolf look uncomfortable.

Tabaqui sat still, rejoicing in the mischief that he had made, and then he said spitefully:

"Shere Khan, the Big One, has shifted his hunting grounds. He will hunt among these hills for the next moon, so he has told me."

Shere Khan was the tiger who lived near the Wainganga River, twenty miles away.

"He has no right!" Father Wolf began angrily. "By the Law of the jungle he has no right to change his quarters without due warning. He will frighten every head of game within ten miles, and I -- I have to kill for two, these days."

"His mother did not call him Lungri [the Lame One] for nothing," said Mother Wolf, quietly. "He has been lame in one foot from his birth. That is why he has only killed cattle. Now the villagers of the Wainganga are angry with him, and he has come here to make our villagers angry. They will scour the jungle for him when he is far away, and we and our children must run when the grass is set alight. Indeed, we are very grateful to Shere Khan!"

"Shall I tell him of your gratitude?" said Tabaqui.

"Out!" snapped Father Wolf. "Out and hunt with thy master. Thou hast done harm enough for one night."

"I go," said Tabaqui, quietly. "Ye can hear Shere Khan below in the thickets. I might have saved myself the message."

Father Wolf listened, and below in the valley that ran down to a little river, he heard the dry, angry, snarly, singsong whine of a tiger who has caught nothing and does not care if all the jungle knows it.

"The fool!" said Father Wolf. "To begin a night's work with that noise! Does he think that our buck are like his fat Wainganga bullocks?"

"Hsh. It is neither bullock nor buck he hunts tonight," said Mother Wolf "It is Man." The whine had changed to a sort of humming purr that seemed to come from every quarter of the compass. It was the noise that bewilders woodcutters and gypsies sleeping in the open, and makes them run sometimes into the very mouth of the tiger.

"Man!" said Father Wolf, showing all his white teeth. "Faugh! Are there not enough beetles and frogs in the tanks that he must eat Man, and on our ground too!"

The Law of the jungle, which never orders anything without a reason, forbids every beast to eat Man except when he is killing to show his children how to kill, and then he must hunt outside the hunting grounds of his pack or tribe. The real reason for this is that man-killing means, sooner or later, the arrival of white men on elephants, with guns, and hundreds of brown men with gongs and rockets and torches. Then everybody in the jungle suffers. The reason the beasts give among themselves is that Man is the weakest and most defenseless of all living things, and it is unsportsmanlike to touch him. They say too -- and it is true -- that maneaters become mangy, and lose their teeth.

The purr grew louder, and ended in the full-throated "Aaarh!" of the tiger's charge.

Then there was a howl -- an untigerish howl -- from Shere Khan. "He has missed," said Mother Wolf "What is it?"

The Jungle Book. Copyright © by Rudyard Kipling. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Table of Contents

The Jungle Books Introduction
Note on the Text
The Jungle Book
Preface
Mowgli's Brothers
Hunting Song of the Seeonee Pack
Kaa's Hunting
Road-Song of the Bandar-Log
"Tiger-Tiger!"
Mowgli's Song
The White Seal
Lukannon
"Rikki-tikki-tavi"
Darzee's Chaunt
Toomai of the Elephants
Shiv and the Grasshopper
Servants of the Queen
Parade-Song of the Camp-Animals

The Second Jungle Book
How Fear Came
The Law of the Jungle
The Miracle of Purun Bhagat
A Song of Kabir
Letting in the Jungle
Mowgli's Song against People
The Undertakers
A Ripple Song
The King's Ankus
The Song of the Little Hunter
Quiquern
Angutivun Tina
Red Dog
Chil's Song
The Spring Running
The Outsong

Notes

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 203 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(73)

4 Star

(45)

3 Star

(42)

2 Star

(19)

1 Star

(24)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 203 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 5, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    "For it is I ,Wontala, who goest before thee"

    This book is the best assembly and compilation of the Jungle Books, which were not necessarily written in chronolgical order of the story events, that I have found.

    Mowgli, meaning naked frog presents himself as the Christ Child bourne in a manger and presented as the holder and keeper of Jungle Law. Kaa the Python, Hathi the Elephant, Baloo the Bear, and Bageerah the Panther, all marshal soldier and advise this child king of the wilds at nation building and holding against the Anti Christ, a daenon in the form of the Tiger Sher Khan.

    The Seeonee wolf clan are his brethren and like Romulus he is put to the test insofar as much that no wolf can dethrone him from the ascension after the dying Alpha leader, Akela.

    I cannot do the book justice for it is the Bible of the Oxford school and the Scouts of William Baden Powell, down the line beyond J.R.R. Tolkein, Frank Herbert, Lewis Carol and lo and behold Sting of the Police and onward.

    The book has been used as a military treatise as to the way of the Continental Soldier of Britian and as a study and meditation into the cosmic and eartly forces of nature.

    Some of my favorites are: The Day Fear Came, Red Dog, Riki Tiki Tavi, The Song of the Seeonee pack (insert King Solomon), and Jungle Law. This is some of the greatest prose ever written in the English language.

    Son of Kaa he bespeaketh upon this matter hsssssss.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2007

    A reviewer

    I had read the Jungle Books a while back and enjoyed the stories then. I have recently re-read the 'Books' and found I like them better the second time around. I found this to be one of the true classics of english literature on it's own, but with the Barnes and Noble Classic Series the insight into the author and his world really bring the book to life.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2013

    Dum

    STUPID BOOK NOT THE REAL VERSION

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2012

    Loved it!

    This book is an amazing classic that is a must for readers of all ages! :)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2012

    Eagleheart

    He drank from the stream.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2012

    It an awesome book

    This is a book i would give as a college graduation gift to a guy. It has a wonderful storyline. To me it was an allegory using animals as the representation for a human. It was adventurous, it was funny and i was able to relate with this story. I would highly recomend this book to anyone really. This is a must have for any library.

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  • Posted November 22, 2010

    amazing

    my ansester wrote this book and everyone should read this at some point in there life

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2010

    A Classic Tresure

    The Jungle Books are Rudyard Kipling's classic tales of life in the wild. It's often classified as children's literature, and while I loved it as a child, I greatly enjoyed rereading it as an adult. Mowgli's story is still my favorite and is far more realistically depicted than the Disney version. Be careful when buying this title that you get both the first and second jungle book together as in this edition. Some other editions only contain the first or second book. Kipling is great, and this is his best.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2010

    In the Jungle

    nothing like the move everyone saw as a child from what i remember it was a really different story.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2007

    Read this then watch the many movies

    These are wonderful tales of animal magic and human success. I grew up with these stories and others by Rudyard Kipling and then found the 1942 Sabu movie of 'The Jungle Book' and fell in love with them all over again. These are the kinds of stories even the smartest kids can learn good qualities from because the characters either save themselves or an animal saves them - and this shows them trust, loyalty, courage and honor towards, for and of others. Very much like I teach my own son.

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    Posted March 29, 2011

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    Posted August 19, 2010

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    Posted July 22, 2011

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    Posted May 26, 2012

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    Posted September 10, 2010

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    Posted July 27, 2011

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