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Jungle Jim and the Voodoo Tiger
     

Jungle Jim and the Voodoo Tiger

5.0 1
by James Luther Dickinson
 

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Hot on the heels of Fishing with Charlie and Other Selected Readings, his deeply mystical series of spoken word readings of various heroes of vernacular culture, comes Jim Dickinson the hoodoo music man on Jungle Jim and the Voodoo Tiger. This is a fitting part two, given the immediacy and raw soul in

Overview

Hot on the heels of Fishing with Charlie and Other Selected Readings, his deeply mystical series of spoken word readings of various heroes of vernacular culture, comes Jim Dickinson the hoodoo music man on Jungle Jim and the Voodoo Tiger. This is a fitting part two, given the immediacy and raw soul in music he covers. (Yep, not an original in the bunch -- thank you Jesus, because, as Tav Falco says, "there's too many of them already.") Here are forgotten, truth-telling songs written in the rock, country, soul, blues, gospel and even samba vernaculars -- the beat-conscious languages of people who have often been excluded from the discussion, either by governments, race, class, or record companies -- by non-legends who should be (and are, among their small aesthetic constituencies) like Bob Frank, Terry Fell, Jim Isbell, Shari Paulus, J. Mathus, Eddie Hinton, Collin Wade Monk, Greg Spradlin, Chuck Prophet, Bill Nettles, Luiz Bonfá, and a few others. This is shack-shakin' music, full of deep R&B with Southern soul overtones ("Hadacol Boogie" and "Can't Beat the Kid, Pt. 2"), country boogie ("Rooster Blues" and "Truck Drivin' Man"), honky tonk balladry ("Violin Bums" and "Somewhere Down the Road"), and Brazilian ghetto samba ("Samba de Orfeo"). Dickinson, who plays keyboards and sings, is accompanied by drumming son Cody and guitar-slinging son Luther (with a bit of help from Alvin Youngblood Hart on both "Love Bone" and "Can't Beat the Kid, Pt. 2"), acoustic bassist Amy LaVere, Tommy Burroughs on violin, Mark Sallings on harmonica, Jim Spake on baritone sax, and Jimmy Davis and Reba Russell on backing vocals. Fans of the original Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen will go nuts for this, as will fans of roots music done with excellence (and a certain irreverence for pristine studio procedure), and lovers of cheap beer and whiskey. Actually, anyone drawn to what is truly and gloriously vulgar in working-class culture and who loves music will celebrate this as a classic -- in much the same way we hear the great records of Hinton, Jerry Lee Lewis, and even Dickinson himself (Dixie Fried). Amazing.

Product Details

Release Date:
05/30/2006
Label:
Memphis Int'l
UPC:
0823862201220
catalogNumber:
215
Rank:
49025

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

James Luther Dickinson   Primary Artist,Keyboards,Vocals
Tommy Burroughs   Violin
Mark Sallings   Harmonica
Jim Spake   Baritone Saxophone
Alvin Youngblood Hart   Guitar
Luther Dickinson   Banjo,Guitar
Cody Dickinson   Percussion,Drums
Amy LaVere   Acoustic Bass
Paul Taylor Choristers   Electric Bass
Reba Russell   Background Vocals
Jimmy Davis   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

Ry Cooder   Liner Notes
Bob Frank   Composer
James Luther Dickinson   Producer
Terry Fell   Composer
Jim Isbell   Composer
Andre Michel Salvet   Composer
Bill Nettles   Composer
John Robinette   Cover Illustration
J. West   Composer
Kevin Houston   Engineer
David Less   Producer,Audio Production
Brooke Barnett   Graphic Design
Greg Spradlin   Composer
Shari Paulus   Composer
Jimmy Davis   Audio Production

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Jungle Jim and the Voodoo Tiger 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
After decades, even centuries of anticipation, World Boogie has arrived! (And just in the nick of time, I might add.)