Jupiter

Jupiter

by Elaine Landau
     
 

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The books in the highly praised First Book series provide basic facts on subjects in the social studies, the sciences, sports, and practical and fine arts. An inviting format, lively text, and interesting illustrations make these books especially popular with young readers. Each book is indexed and, where appropriate, includes a glossary, maps, further reading, and… See more details below

Overview

The books in the highly praised First Book series provide basic facts on subjects in the social studies, the sciences, sports, and practical and fine arts. An inviting format, lively text, and interesting illustrations make these books especially popular with young readers. Each book is indexed and, where appropriate, includes a glossary, maps, further reading, and bibliography.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Greg M. Romaneck
Jupiter is the largest planet in our solar system. If this gigantic planet were a hollow ball, over 1000 copies of the Earth could be placed inside it. On Jupiter's surface, fierce storms rage for decades or even centuries, with winds blowing at over 400 miles per hour. Indeed, the huge red dot that characterizes Jupiter's surface is in fact a storm that has swirled for untold centuries. It is the story of this giant of the solar system that is told in this work of science. With the attention paid to the climate, geography, and moons of Jupiter, this book provides a fine introduction to the giant of our solar system. The reader is also provided with an overview of man's efforts to observe and study Jupiter. Galileo's efforts to scan Jupiter through his telescope led to the identification of the first known moons orbiting the planet. Subsequently, modern space probes have traveled to Jupiter and provided data and photographs of both Jupiter and some of its moons. Each of these scientific explorations are described and detailed. All in all, this book combines a readable text with ample illustrations to provide a good starting point for an astronomical study of Jupiter.
Children's Literature - Scott S. Floyd
Is Jupiter really the king of the planets? According to this book, Jupiter is the fourth brightest object in the sky most of the year. Jupiter is also the ruler of the Universe according to Roman mythology. But let's go beyond that. It takes nearly twelve years for Jupiter to orbit the sun, but it rotates completely on its axis in just nine hours and fifty minutes. It also has a magnetic pull fourteen times greater than Earth's. With wonderful photos, sketches, graphs, and charts, the reader is given a greater understanding of this planet in our solar system. This well-written book will be in my classroom. Part of the "Books About Space" series.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 3-5-- These introductions to planets are filled with full-color photographs, paintings, and colorful chapter heads, but contain no tables or useful diagrams. Landau's texts fill only a third of the respective titles, but still manage to combine unnecessary wordiness with scientific inaccuracy. She defines ``equator'' in such a way that could mean any great circle; confuses the relation between size, mass, and density; speaks of the Viking landers settling on ``somewhat smooth turf'' on Mars; consistently claims the Galilean moons are the four nearest Jupiter; and supplies misleading background to the discovery of Neptune. These volumes seem intended to replace Vogt's Mars and the Inner Planets and Nourse's The Giant Planets (both Watts, 1982). They represent a major shift in the series to reach younger audiences; but rather than updating information, they too often omit it instead. They are more comparable to David Hughes's ``Planetary Exploration Series'' (Facts on File), which contain their own share of errors, illustrated with flamboyant paintings. For scientific accuracy, one is generally safest with volumes from Isaac Asimov's ``Library of the Universe'' (Gareth Stevens) in spite of their lack of straightforward organization. Or one can turn to the photo essays of Seymour Simon: Jupiter (1985) and Mars (1987 both Morrow) for inspiration and get the facts and figures from encyclopedias and almanacs. --Margaret Chatham, formerly at Smithtown Library, NY

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780531157688
Publisher:
Scholastic Library Publishing
Publication date:
03/01/1996
Series:
First Books Series
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
6.99(w) x 8.47(h) x 0.16(d)
Age Range:
9 - 11 Years

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