Just a Little Too Thin: How to Pull Your Child Back from the Brink of an Eating Disorder

Just a Little Too Thin: How to Pull Your Child Back from the Brink of an Eating Disorder

by Michael Strober, Meg Schneider, Meg F. Schneider
     
 

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At a time when 81 percent of ten-year-old girls say they are afraid of being fat, early dieting is clearly a widespread problem. However, the difference between being "just a little too thin" and having a full-blown eating disorder can be hard for even the most involved parent to distinguish. Dr. Michael Strober and Meg Schneider's Just a Little Too Thin

Overview

At a time when 81 percent of ten-year-old girls say they are afraid of being fat, early dieting is clearly a widespread problem. However, the difference between being "just a little too thin" and having a full-blown eating disorder can be hard for even the most involved parent to distinguish. Dr. Michael Strober and Meg Schneider's Just a Little Too Thin shows parents how to approach this problem proactively. First, it helps parents determine the severity of a child's weight issues by outlining the three stages of this slippery slope and the behavioral signs associated with each. The book then gives expert guidance on talking about weight and eating in ways that help a daughter cope with the emotional issues that feed her obsession. No matter where a girl rests on the continuum of eating behaviors, Just a Little Too Thin is an invaluable aid for parents intent on keeping their children emotionally and physically healthy in a world of unprecedented pressures.

Editorial Reviews

Psychiatric Services
Not only terrific for therapists, but also for parents. Offers concrete advice on what to say, look for, and do.
Publishers Weekly
As the title indicates, this thorough and informative guide targets teens who are teetering on the edge of a potential eating disorder, exhibiting warning signs yet still on the brink. At this delicate and precarious point, there are preventive measures concerned parents can take, which eating disorder authority Strober and psychologist Schneider clearly delineate in a user-friendly, approachable style. The dual authorship allows for not only a variety of illustrative anecdotes, but also for both the male and female perspective on body image. The book alerts parents to signs they may not have otherwise noticed, and presents a number of realistic scenarios and suggestions for parents to counter almost any situation that may arise in regard to burgeoning eating disorders. Although some of the advice may seem forced--such as initiating more conversations about "feelings"--the book's suggestions are easily adaptable. The call for more direct communication as well as a comprehensible breakdown of the various behaviors that can indicate a potential eating problem will give readers a firm grip on the issue, its dangers and ways to step in before it's too late. Agent, Carol Mann. (Sept.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
During the past decade, a plethora of books on adolescent eating disorders has been published. Strober, director of the Eating Disorders and Adolescent Mood Disorders Programs at the Neuropsychiatric Institute at UCLA, and therapist Schneider, who specializes in treating adolescents and their families, attempt to carve a new niche in this area. Their focus is the "slippery slope that leads to poor health, even if it is not a diagnosed eating disorder," and they divide this slope into three stages-innocent, exhilarated, and obsessed-spending the bulk of the book defining the warning signs and characteristics of each stage. Numerous case studies provide examples of teenage girls who are excessively weight-conscious or abnormally preoccupied with dieting. Although the authors contend that parents can be highly effective in treating potential eating disorders, they offer little substantial advice; instead, they merely suggest that parents encourage and talk to their children and, when that doesn't work, seek professional help. A much more useful selection is Marcia Herrin's The Parent's Guide to Childhood Eating Disorders, which provides specific guidelines for dealing with confronting resistance, ensuring that a child's health is not damaged, setting limits on strenuous exercise, and educating the child to make sound food choices. Not recommended.-Ilse Heidmann, Washington State Lib., Olympia Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780738210186
Publisher:
Da Capo Press
Publication date:
08/15/2005
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
6.32(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.91(d)

Meet the Author

Michael A. Strober, Ph.D., is the Director of both the Eating Disorders Program and Adolescent Mood Disorders Program at the Neuropsychiatric Institute at UCLA. Also the Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Eating Disorders, he lives in Los Angeles, California. Meg Schneider, M.A., L.M.S.W., is a therapist who divides her time between a private practice and an outpatient mental health center in New York, where she specializes in treating adolescents and their families.

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