Just Because I'm a Woman [Bonus Tracks]

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Mark Deming
Just Because I'm a Woman was Dolly Parton's first album for RCA Victor after a few modest hits for Monument and more importantly becoming a regular on Porter Wagoner's television show and his frequent duet partner both on-stage and in the studio. One might have figured that, between Chet Atkins' trademark "countrypolitan" production style and Wagoner's influence, Parton's musical personality would be lost in the shuffle, but thankfully quite the opposite was true -- Just Because I'm a Woman turned out to be one of Parton's best early albums, and a superb showcase for her gifts as both a singer and songwriter. Bob Ferguson, Atkins' second-in-command at RCA, took a subdued ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Mark Deming
Just Because I'm a Woman was Dolly Parton's first album for RCA Victor after a few modest hits for Monument and more importantly becoming a regular on Porter Wagoner's television show and his frequent duet partner both on-stage and in the studio. One might have figured that, between Chet Atkins' trademark "countrypolitan" production style and Wagoner's influence, Parton's musical personality would be lost in the shuffle, but thankfully quite the opposite was true -- Just Because I'm a Woman turned out to be one of Parton's best early albums, and a superb showcase for her gifts as both a singer and songwriter. Bob Ferguson, Atkins' second-in-command at RCA, took a subdued and natural approach to the production, with a refined but organic honky tonk sound dominating many of the arrangements, though he knew when to take a more ambitious approach on the dark tale of adultery and abandonment "The Bridge." And while Dolly only gets songwriting credit on four of the album's 12 songs, they're four of the real standouts, including "You're Gonna Be Sorry," "The Bridge," and the title tune, with the rest of the selections fitting Parton's trademark blend of fragility and strength just right, and her versatile soprano voice displaying the confidence, power, and emotional range that would make her a country superstar within a few years. While Parton was not always well served by the Nashville music factories ironically enough, this became an even bigger problem for her after she crossed over to mainstream stardom, Just Because I'm a Woman was one of those rare examples of the bigwigs getting it right the first time out, and the album still sounds like a winner more than 35 years after its initial release. [BMG Heritage's 2003 CD reissue tacks on two fine bonus tracks, outtakes from the April 1970 concert that was taped for the live album A Real Live Dolly, including a lovely solo acoustic performance of "Coat of Many Colors."]
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 10/7/2003
  • Label: Sony Mod - Afw Line
  • UPC: 828765612326
  • Catalog Number: 56123
  • Sales rank: 50,351

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Dolly Parton Primary Artist
Johnny Gimble Fiddle
Pete Drake Steel Guitar
Lloyd Green Steel Guitar
Anita Carter Background Vocals
Charles Trénet Banjo, Electric Banjo
Joe Babcock Background Vocals
Jerry Carrigan Drums
Chip Young Rhythm Guitar
Bobby Dyson Bass
Dolores Edgin Background Vocals
D.J. Fontana Drums
Roy M. "Junior" Husky Bass
Wayne Moss Electric Guitar
June Page Background Vocals
Hargus "Pig" Robbins Piano
Dale Sellers Electric Guitar
Mack Magaha Fiddle
George W. McCormick Guitar, Rhythm Guitar
James Buchanan Fiddle
David Briggs Piano
Troy Jack Drake Guitar
Technical Credits
Dolly Parton Composer
Charles Trénet Composer
Bob Ferguson Producer
Harlan Howard Composer
Shirl Milete Composer
Al Pachucki Engineer
Robert Tubert Composer
Porter Wagoner Liner Notes
Rich Kienzle Liner Notes
Darcy Proper Mastering
George W. McCormick Composer
Bill Owens Composer
Neal Merritt Composer
Demetriss Tubert Composer
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    The headwaters of all that is Dolly Parton

    Having waxed an earlier LP for Monument, this isn't Parton's official solo debut, but with her meteoric rise to prominence as Porter Wagoner's duet partner, and her transfer to RCA, this 1968 release marks the true spiritual start of her solo career. It not only lays out the spare sound that would make her early recordings so powerful (and distinct from the countrypolitan records being churned out by Nashville at the time), but stakes out the songwriting prowess that would continue to shine to this very day. ¶ In addition to a few of Wagoner's band members and fine Nashville studio hands (including stellar, and recently un-retired, steel player, Lloyd Green), Parton was lucky to have Chet Atkins' assistant Bob Ferguson at the producer's desk. In contrast to Atkins, Ferguson used a lighter sound that kept Parton and her background singers (including Anita Carter) front and center. Parton penned four of this set's tunes (the title track, the self-empowered "You're Gonna Be Sorry," the Bakersfieldian "I'll Oilwells Love You," and the powerful love-to-abandonment parable "The Bridge"), but she's also very well served by like-minded songs collected from others. "False Eyelashes" is a twangy tale of failed ambitions, and the self-discovery of Neal Merritt's "The Only Way Out (Is to Walk Over Me)" fits Parton's combination of fragility and resolve to a tee. ¶ RCA's CD reissue adds two previously unreleased live tracks from 1970, one is the title tune, and the second of the first-ever recording of "Coat of Many Colors." While the latter doesn't have the heartstring-production of the subsequent hit single, it's sparse acoustic guitar accompaniment (rendering this nearly an a cappella performance) starkly frames its hymnal qualities. This is probably the only time you'll ever hear Parton announce on stage, "I'd like to do a song called 'The Coat of Many Colors'" and not hear the audience thunder with applause (until the end, of course). You can sense the breathless discovery of Parton's audience hearing this gem for the first time, and Parton's emotion in singing it for an audience that hasn't already heard the true-life story. ¶ As great as Parton's hits are, it's even greater to hear them in the context of all the other fine songs she wrote and sang. A few of her later albums (e.g., 1971's "Coat of Many Colors") may edge this one slightly in overall strength, but this is a truly essential part of country music's heritage and a great place to begin one's appreciation of Parton's entire catalog.

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