Ka'iulani: The People's Princess, Hawaii, 1889 by Ellen Emerson White, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Ka'iulani: The People's Princess, Hawaii, 1889

Ka'iulani: The People's Princess, Hawaii, 1889

3.7 29
by Ellen Emerson White
     
 
In their hope to restore Hawaii¹s toppled monarchy and the Hawaiian way of life the people of Hawaii turn to Princess Kaiulani, who is only a young girl. Acclaimed author Ellen Emerson White makes her debut on the Royal Diaries list with this compelling narrative of the tumultuous years following Hawaii¹s forced annexation to the United States, skillfully

Overview

In their hope to restore Hawaii¹s toppled monarchy and the Hawaiian way of life the people of Hawaii turn to Princess Kaiulani, who is only a young girl. Acclaimed author Ellen Emerson White makes her debut on the Royal Diaries list with this compelling narrative of the tumultuous years following Hawaii¹s forced annexation to the United States, skillfully rendering the voice of the young princess and the unrest of a people.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
Kaiulani was very informative about how the Hawaiians felt about Hawaii becoming part of the United States. The book also gave a sense of traditional Hawaiian culture. White did a good job of developing the characters and emphasizing their feelings about people and events in the story. This book probably would appeal most to teens interested in history and the history of Hawaii. VOYA CODES: 3Q 4P M J (Readable without serious defects; Broad general YA appeal; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9). 2001, Scholastic, 238p. PLB $10.95. Ages 11 to 15. Reviewer: Kristen Moreland, Teen Reviewer
KLIATT
The Royal Diaries series contain the most exotic stories—from Tsarist Russia (Anastasia) to King Henry VIII's court (Mary and Elizabeth) and now the island of Hawaii at the end of the 19th century. It was a time when the American families who had come to Hawaii first as missionaries now were agitating to get rid of the Hawaiian monarchy and claim Hawaii as a territory of the United States. They were ultimately successful in this effort in 1893, before Princess Kaiulani ever became queen. Through the events in this story, the princess is educated to become queen and acknowledged as heir to the throne. The diary begins in 1889 as Kaiulani prepares to leave Hawaii to go to school in England, when she is a young teenager. She describes her idyllic life in Hawaii. She is much loved by her Scottish father, mourns the death of her mother (her tie to the Hawaiian royal family), and enjoys a friendship with the visiting author Robert Lewis Stevenson and his family. She tells of her journey to San Francisco and across America by train, the sea journey from New York to England, and her experiences in England as she makes friends and gains confidence. Through all this, she is constantly worried about family and political events in Hawaii. When she is 17, she journeys to the United States on a public relations tour, pleading for the survival of the Hawaiian monarchy, putting herself forward as a model young woman, an educated Christian (not a savage as many Americans thought of Hawaiians), well trained to represent her people. White is an experienced writer of YA fiction and this experience shows in the narrative drive of the diaries: she doesn't neglect the emotional impact of life eventson her subject, so the diary is a story of anguish and joy, confusion and courage. KLIATT Codes: J—Recommended for junior high school students. 2001, Scholastic, 237p, illus, 19cm, $10.95. Ages 13 to 15. Reviewer: Claire Rosser; May 2001 (Vol. 35 No. 3)
School Library Journal
Gr 4-8-This fictional journal covers a period of four years in the short life of Princess Victoria Kaiulani of Hawaii. Beginning in 1889, the 13-year-old starts recording her thoughts before she is sent to school in England. As heir to the royal Hawaiian throne, she must learn the poise and composure befitting a future monarch, a role she takes very seriously. In the earlier years of the journal, the overall tone is lighthearted, but Kaiulani frequently alludes to the political difficulties confronting the monarchy, which is plagued by exploitative American business interests. As the problems mount, the diary entries become sparse and filled with the princess's personal worries, with mentions of her failing health. The quotidian writing style is often self-conscious and frivolous, maturing along with the teen. The easy-to-read diary format will appeal to young audiences. The epilogue and historical notes that follow are essential for understanding the historical context of the story. The final sections of the book have several pages of photos and a glossary of Hawaiian words that appear in the text. This book provides an effective way of spreading the story of a dignified and courageous young woman. While it is not as well written as some other titles in this series, it is still a worthy addition to collections carrying the "Royal Diaries."-Be Astengo, Alachua County Library, Gaines- ville, FL Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439129091
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
04/01/2001
Series:
Royal Diaries Series
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
5.43(w) x 7.72(h) x 0.88(d)
Lexile:
940L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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