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Kant's Theory of A Priori Knowledge / Edition 1

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2001 Hardcover Fine Still shrink wrapped 058 Shrink wrapped and unopened. Includes supplemental or companion materials if applicable. Connecting readers since 1972. Customer ... service is our top priority. Read more Show Less

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Overview

The prevailing interpretation of Kant’s First Critique in Anglo-American philosophy views his theory of a priori knowledge as basically a theory about the possibility of empirical knowledge (or experience), or the a priori conditions for that possibility (the representations of space and time and the categories). Instead, Robert Greenberg argues that Kant is more fundamentally concerned with the possibility of a priori knowledge—the very possibility of the possibility of empirical knowledge in the first place.

Greenberg advances four central theses:(1) the Critique is primarily concerned about the possibility, or relation to objects, of a priori, not empirical knowledge, and Kant’s theory of that possibility is defensible; (2) Kant’s transcendental ontology must be distinct from the conditions of the possibility of a priori knowledge; (3) the functions of judgment, in Kant’s discussion of the Table of Judgments, should be seen according to his transcendental logic as having content, not as being just logical forms of judgment making; (4) Kant’s distinction between and connection of ordering relations (Verhaltnisse) and reference relations (Beziehungen) have to be kept in mind to avoid misunderstanding the Critique.

At every step of the way Greenberg contrasts his view with the major interpretations of Kant by commentators like Henry Allison, Jonathan Bennett, Paul Guyer, and Peter Strawson. Not only does this new approach to Kant present a strong challenge to these dominant interpretations, but by being more true to Kant’s own intent it holds promise for making better sense out of what have been seen as the First Critique’s discordant themes.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Centering on the notion of ‘things’ simpler (as opposed to either things ‘in themselves’ or objects of experience as such), Greenberg has developed a highly original reading of Kant’s arguments regarding the a priori conditions of knowledge. As a challenge to the main lines of approach to those arguments today, it cannot be ignored.”
—Richard E. Aquila, University of Tennessee

“Robert Greenberg offers an intricate, highly original reading of Kant’s first Critique on what constitutes the possibility of a priori knowledge. One of the book’s main features, ambitious in scope, is the author’s extensive polemic against mainstream Anglophone approaches to Kant’s position on a priori knowledge.”
—Irmgard Scherer, Review of Metaphysics

“Centering on the notion of ‘things’ simpler (as opposed to either things ‘in themselves’ or objects of experience as such), Greenberg has developed a highly original reading of Kant’s arguments regarding the a priori conditions of knowledge. As a challenge to the main lines of approach to those arguments today, it cannot be ignored.”
—Richard E. Aquila, University of Tennessee

Booknews
Anglo-American philosophy generally views the German philosopher's theory of knowledge as about the possibility of empirical knowledge or the conditions of that possibility. Not so, says Greenberg (philosophy, Brandeis U.), rather Kant is more fundamentally concerned with the possibility of knowledge, the very possibility of the possibility of empirical knowledge. He nails four theses to the academy's door. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780271020839
  • Publisher: Penn State University Press
  • Publication date: 3/28/2001
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.88 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface
Pt. 1 Introduction
1 The Problem: The Possibility of A Priori Knowledge 3
App. to Ch. 1 Annotated Selected Bibliography of the Customary Interpretations of Kant's Ontology 26
2 Kant's External Realism 31
3 A Synopsis of the Solution to the Problem of A Priori Knowledge 47
4 A Model of Kant's Theory of Representation 57
Pt. 2 Transcendental Ontology
5 Interpretation of Text; Theory and View 77
6 Monism or Dualism? 89
7 The Necessity of Kant's Idealism 103
8 Sensibility and the Understanding, Appearances and Things in Themselves 125
Pt. 3 Transcendental Logic
9 The Content of Kant's Logical Functions of Judgment 137
10 Kant's Categories Reconsidered 159
11 Three Issues in Step One of the B-Deduction 177
12 Judgment, Consciousness, and the Categories 193
13 Perception and the Categories 213
14 The Transcendental Character of the Second Analogy 237
Pt. 4 Review
15 Transcendental Epistemology 257
Index 271
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