Kaplan GED 2005-2006

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*Hundreds of sample questions with detailed explanations
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*Effective strategies and review for every section of the GED
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Overview

Features:
*Hundreds of sample questions with detailed explanations
*Full-length GED practice test with diagnostic feedback
*Effective strategies and review for every section of the GED
*Clear instructions on how to use the Casio fx-260 Calculator, the calculator used on the GED Mathematics Test

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780743251662
  • Publisher: Kaplan Publishing
  • Publication date: 12/28/2004
  • Edition description: Original
  • Edition number: 7
  • Pages: 704
  • Product dimensions: 8.38 (w) x 10.88 (h) x 1.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Caren Van Slyke is a nationally recognized expert on the GED. She has been involved in GED preparation for more than twenty years as a teacher, editor, and writer. She is the founder and president of Learning Unlimited, which has developed GED materials for the PBS LiteracyLink(c) GED Connection series.

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Read an Excerpt

Kaplan GED 2005-2006


By Caren Van Slyke

Kaplan

Copyright © 2005 Caren Van Slyke
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0743251660

Chapter 1: Language Arts, Writing

The GED Language Arts, Writing Test consists of two parts. Part I uses multiple choice questions to assess your knowledge of the conventions of written English. Part II requires you to write an essay. The scores for Parts I and II will be combined and reported to you as a single score. You will have a total of two hours for the test.

Part I: 50 questions, 1 hour 15 minutes
On Part I, you will read 6 to 9 documents that are 12 to 22 sentences long. You will answer multiple choice questions about each document.

Part II: 1 essay, 45 minutes
The test directions tell you to plan, make notes, write, revise, and edit an essay on an assigned topic. It is recommended that you take 45 minutes for your essay. If you have time left, you can go back to work on Part I.

Part I: Content Areas
Organization (15 percent) These questions focus on the clarity with which ideas are presented and organized. Organization items ask about choosing effective topic sentences, paragraphing, moving sentences to improve the order of ideas, removing irrelevant sentences, and using transitions. You can review and practice these skills on pages 66-73 and 80-83.

Sentence Structure (30 percent) These questions will testyour ability to recognize and correct errors in sentence structure. Topics include correcting sentence fragments, comma splices, and run-on sentences; combining ideas effectively; correctly placing modifying words or phrases; and making sure that parallel parts of a sentence are consistent. You can review and practice these skills on pages 84-97 and 102-105.

Usage (30 percent) These questions ask about the rules governing our use of the English language. Topics include choosing correct verb forms and tenses, making subjects and verbs agree, and correcting common errors in pronoun use. You can review and practice these skills on pages 106-117 and 120-123.

Mechanics (25 percent) Mechanics questions focus on correcting errors in punctuation, capitalization, and spelling. Most of the punctuation questions concern comma use and misuse. Capitalization items apply rules for capitalizing and for avoiding unnecessary capitalization. Spelling questions focus on possessives, contractions, homonyms, and commonly confused words. You can review and practice these skills on pages 124-133 and 136-139.

Part I: Multiple Choice

Three Types of Documents
You will read and answer questions about three types of documents:

· How-to documents such as instructions and directions · Workplace documents such as business letters and memos · Informational documents such as mailings on tourist destinations or analyses of public transit needs

Read each document before you answer the questions that follow it. As you read, look for errors and other problems, as if you were going to fix them. That way, you will be able to predict many of the questions that follow. You will also be better able to answer questions that ask you to look at the piece as a whole. For example, for some questions you must consider the organization of the piece, such as where you should divide one long paragraph, or the relevance of a detail, such as which sentence could be deleted.

Three Types of Questions
Read the document below. Then choose answers to the questions that follow.

Getting Started with Exercise
(1) Sooner or later, we all realize that we are not getting any younger. (2) At that point, many of us decide too start an exercise program. (3) For an exercise program to be effective, you need to spend at least 20 minutes, 3 times a week. (4) If you decide to exercise regularly, you should first check with your doctor. (5) Your doctor will tell you what type of exercise is best for you.

Correction Questions
These questions require you to identify an error in a sentence and the best way to fix it. But be aware: some sentences will not contain any errors. For these questions, choose option (5) -- no correction is necessary (or no revision is necessary).

Example Sentence 2: At that point, many of us decide too start an exercise program.

Which correction should be made to sentence 2?
(1) remove the comma after point
(2) insert we after us
(3) change decide to decides
(4) replace too with to
(5) no correction is necessary

Answer: (4) replace too with to This spelling correction replaces one word with the correct homonym.

Revision Questions
A revision question shows you an underlined portion of a sentence or sentences and asks you to choose the best revision for it. The first option will always be the same as the underlined words. If the sentence is correct as written, you should choose option (1).

Example Sentence 3: For an exercise program to be effective, you need to spend at least 20 minutes, 3 times a week.

Which is the best way to write the underlined portion of this sentence? If the original is the best way, choose option (1).

(1) effective, you
(2) effective you
(3) effective. You
(4) effective, and you
(5) effective, so you

Answer: (1) effective, you The sentence is correct as written. The other options incorrectly punctuate the sentence or add an unnecessary connecting word.

Construction Shift Questions
These items ask you to recognize writing that may not be technically incorrect, but it is wordy or awkward. When you read the sentence or pair of sentences, you need to think about how you could rewrite to improve them.

Example Sentences 4 and 5: If you decide to exercise regularly, you should first check with your doctor. Your doctor will tell you what type of exercise is best for you.

The most effective combination of sentences 4 and 5 would include which group of words?

(1) If you ever do decide whether or not to,
(2) When you are deciding
(3) At the time at which you decide,
(4) doctor, who will tell you
(5) doctor, and then he or she will

Answer: (4) doctor, who will tell you Option (4) smoothly combines the two sentences to eliminate the repeated phrase your doctor. The new sentence would read as follows: If you decide to exercise regularly, you should first check with your doctor, who will tell you what type of exercise is best for you. The other options would not solve the problem of repetition or would create an even more awkward sentence.

Part II: The Essay
You will have 45 minutes to write an essay on an assigned topic. The directions encourage you to plan, make notes, draft, revise, and edit your essay. Once you practice writing on the essay topics in this book, you will see that 45 minutes is enough time to plan, write, and edit a well-developed essay of about 250 words.

Essay Topic
You will be given a topic, sometimes called a "prompt," to write about. The topic will be one that you can write about by drawing on your general life experience and observations. Specialized knowledge will not be needed. The essay will ask you to give your opinion or an explanation. Below is a sample GED essay prompt:

TOPIC
Many people vote in every election. Other people don't vote at all. Do you think that it is important to vote? Why or why not?

In your essay, explain the reasons for your opinion.

Holistic Scoring
Two readers will read your essay; each will assign it a score from 1 to 4. The average of the two scores is combined, through a formula, with your score from Part I.

The essay readers won't take out a red pen and mark mistakes. Rather, each will read the essay once, fairly quickly, to get an impression of your work as a whole. This method of evaluating is called "holistic" scoring. The essay readers will ask themselves the following questions about your paper:

· Is there a clearly focused main idea?
· Does the main idea of the essay address the assigned topic?
· Is the essay clear and logically organized?
· Is the word choice appropriate and effective?
· Does the essay basically contain correct sentence structure, grammar, and mechanics?

Your essay score will reflect one of the general categories shown below:

Level 4 -- effective
Level 3 -- adequate
Level 2 -- marginal
Level 1 -- inadequate

If your essay receives an average score of less than 2, you will not receive any score for the Language Arts; Writing Test, even if you performed well on Part I.

Copyright © 2005 by Kaplan, Inc.

Continues...


Excerpted from Kaplan GED 2005-2006 by Caren Van Slyke Copyright © 2005 by Caren Van Slyke. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Contents

OVERVIEW OF THE GED TESTS

KAPLAN GED STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS

GED PRETESTS


Language Arts, Writing

Social Studies

Science

Language Arts, Reading

Mathematics

Pretest Answers and Explanations

Language Arts, Writing

Social Studies

Science Pretest

Language Arts, Reading

Mathematics


UNIT 1: LANGUAGE ARTS, WRITING

About the Test

Clear and Organized Writing


Ideas and Paragraphs

Logical Order and Relevance

Relating Sentences and Paragraphs

Essay Writing Process: Prewriting

Essay Writing Process: Drafting

Practice Questions

Sentence Structure

Complete Simple Sentences

Compound and Complex Sentences

Run-Ons and Comma Splices

Subordinating Ideas

Modifying Ideas

Parallel Structure

Essay Writing Process: Revising Your Sentences

Practice Questions

Grammar and Usagev
Nouns and Pronouns

Verb Forms and Tenses

Subject-Verb Agreement

Essay Writing Skills: Editing

Practice Questions

Mechanics

Comma Use

Capitalization

Spelling

Essay Writing Process: Editing for Correct Mechanics

Practice Questions

The GED Essay

Approaching the Essay Topic

Prewriting Your Essay

Drafting Your Essay

Revising and Editing Your Essay

Your Plan of Attack


UNIT 2: SOCIAL STUDIES

About the Test

U.S. History


Exploration, Colonialism, and the American Revolution

Westward Expansion and the Civil War

Industrialization, Immigration, and the Progressive Era

The United States as an Emerging World Power

Facing Enduring Challenges

Practice Questions

World History

Early Civilizations

Feudalism to Nation States

Expansion and the Global Age

The Age of Revolutions

The Twentieth Century

Practice Questions

Civics and Government

Levels and Branches of Government

Constitutional Government

The Electoral System

The Role of the Citizen

Practice Questions

Economics

Basic Economics Concepts

The U.S. Economic System

The Economy and the U.S. Government

Labor and Consumer Issues

Practice Questions

Geography

Basic Geography Concepts

Humans and the Environment


pardUsing Resources Wisely

Maps and Their Uses

Practice Questions


UNIT 3: SCIENCE

About the Test

Life Science


Cell Structures and Functions

Cell Processes and Energy

Human Body Systems

Health Issues

Reproduction and Heredity

Modern Genetics

Evolution and Natural Selection

Organization of Ecosystems

Practice Questions

Earth and Space Science

Structure of Earth

Earth's Resources

Weather and Climate

Earth in the Solar System

The Expanding Universe

Practice Questions


Physical Science

Atoms and Molecules

Properties and States of Matter

Chemical Reactions

The Nature of Energy

Mot ion and Forces

Electricity and Magnetism

Practice Questions


UNIT 4: LANGUAGE ARTS, READING

About the Test

Nonfiction


Identifying Main Ideas and Supporting Details

Restating and Summarizing

Applying Ideas

Relating Cause and Effect

Comparing and Contrasting

Drawing Conclusions

Determining Tone and Point of View

Practice Questions

Fiction

Understanding Plot Elements

Making Inferences

Analyzing Character

Interpreting Theme

Interpreting Style and Point of View

Practice Questions

Poetry

Understanding Rhyme and Rhythm

Interpreting Figurative Language

Analyzing Symbols and Images

Interpreting Theme

Practice Questions

Drama

Reading Dialogue and Stage Directions

Understanding Dramatic Action

Analyzing Characters

Drawing Conclusions

Practice Questions


UNIT 5: MATH

About the Test

Math Basics


Whole Number Review

Operations Review

Distance and Cost Formulas

Calculators on the GED

Filling in the Standard Grid

Problem Solving: Estimation

Problem Solving: Set-Up Problems

Practice Questions

Decimals and Fractions

Decimal Basics

Decimal Operations

Fraction Basics

Fraction Operations

Solving Problems Using a Calculator

Filling in the Answer Grid

Problem Solving: Fraction and Decimal Equivalencies

Practice Questions

Ratio, Proportion, and Percent

Using Ratio and Proportion to Solve Problems

Understanding Per cents

Using the Percent Formula

Solving Problems Using a Calculator

Simple Interest

Percent of Change

Problem Solving

Practice Questions

Data Analysis

Tables and Pictographs

Bar and Line Graphs

Circle Graphs

Frequency and Central Tendency

Probability

Problem Solving

Practice Questions

Measurement

The English System of Measurement

The Metric System

Using a Calculator

Problem Solving

Practice Questions

Algebra

The Number Line and Signed Numbers

Powers and Roots

Scientific Notation

The Order of Operations

Algebraic Expressions

Algebraic Expressions and the Calculator

Equations

Common Algebra Word Problems

Patterns and Functions

Function Applications

Inequalities

Quadratic Equations

The Coordinate Plane

Linear Equations

Slope of a Line

Distance Between Points

Special Coordinate Grid Items

Problem Solving

Practice Questions


Geometry

Points, Lines, and Angles

Parallel Lines and Transversals

Quadrilaterals

Triangles

Congruent and Similar Triangles

Similar Triangle Applications

Perimeter and Area

Circles

Volume

Irregular Figures

Pythagorean Relationship

Using the Formulas Page

Using the Calculator

Problem Solving

Practice Questions


GED POT-TESTS

Language Arts, Writing

Social Studies

Science

Language Arts, Reading

Mathematics

Post-Test Answers and Explanations

Language Arts, Writing

Social Studies

Science

Language Arts, Reading

Mathematics


ANSWERS AND EXPLANATIONS

Language Arts, Writing

Social Studies

Science

Language Arts, Reading

Mathematics


Formulas Page
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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2005

    Not as good as I thought

    This book is good but not that good simply because it doesn't really have that much information on the subjects provided, especially on the social studies part and has more questions then information given and not that understandable.

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