Kate and Nate Are Running Late! [NOOK Book]

Overview


Being on time is an art?an art most of families have yet to master. From spilling coffee to misplacing keys, we?ve all dealt with the many things that can derail our morning routines. This humorous depiction of chaotic mornings is oh, so true.

Kate and her two children, Nate, and his older sister, Maddie, have all overslept. How will they EVER make it to school and work on ...

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Overview


Being on time is an art—an art most of families have yet to master. From spilling coffee to misplacing keys, we’ve all dealt with the many things that can derail our morning routines. This humorous depiction of chaotic mornings is oh, so true.

Kate and her two children, Nate, and his older sister, Maddie, have all overslept. How will they EVER make it to school and work on time dressed, fed, and organized?



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Editorial Reviews

The New York Times
How refreshing to find a story in which a parent makes a mistake without being turned into a goonish caricature. Children need to know grown-ups make mistakes too; it helps validate their own trial-and-error trajectory. And Egan makes this point felt in an organic way, without pointing it out didactically. Yaccarino's retro illustrations are charming and full of kick. They bear a welcome resemblance to the simple dot-eyed figures of Roy McKie and P.D. Eastman's Snow.
—Pamela Paul
Publishers Weekly
Overeager preschooler Nate, his eight-year-old sister, and their harried mother Kate are under the gun when it comes to getting out of the house in the a.m. Multitasking Kate, whose dot eyes speak volumes about her steely determination to stay on track, “yells, ‘Time to use the potty!’/ when she’s halfway down the stairs./ She starts the coffee, feeds the cats,/ toasts some waffles, slices pears.” As the ripped-from-reality scenes fly by in first-time picture book author Egan’s rhymes, the trio overcomes every potential catastrophe (escaped cats, swiped socks, slippery ice), only to arrive at school... on a Saturday. This family, on the move in the most literal sense, should garner knowing laughs from kids and grownups alike; it’s unlikely readers haven’t experienced at least one of the morning travails depicted. Yaccarino’s (Boy and Bot) sleek retro styling and flat colors are particularly well-suited to a story whose characters have an almost aerodynamic quality; Kate and the family pets in particular look like all they need are jet wings to go airborne. Ages 4–7. Illustrator’s agent: Rebecca Sherman, Writers House. (Oct.)
From the Publisher
"How refreshing to find a story in which a parent makes a mistake without being turned into a goonish caricature. Children need to know grown-ups make mistakes too; it helps validate their own trial-and-error trajectory. And Egan makes this point felt in an organic way, without pointing it out didactically. Yaccarino’s retro illustrations are charming and full of kick."—New York Times online

“This rhyming story humorously details the dreaded weekday-morning routine and its attendant chaos.”—School Library Journal

"...should garner knowing laughs from kids and grownups alike.”—Publishers Weekly

Children's Literature - Cynthia Levinson
This book's rhythmically rhyming text and simple, stylized illustrations convey the flurry of a single-parent household in a hurry. Nate wakes up his mother to tell her that they are running late. Oh, no! Nate must get to preschool, his eight-year-old sister, Maddie, to school, and Kate to work. But, first, they must shower, eat breakfast, feed the cats and dog, button up jackets, find homework, round up the cat and dog, who have escaped—in other words, perform all of the morning tasks that will be familiar to preschool-age listeners, including falling in a puddle and ending in a muddle. The true muddle is revealed on the last page when Kate, Maddie, and Nate arrive at school to discover that no one is there because it is Saturday. This mild twist will not surprise adult readers but may amuse their audience. The text has a singsong quality that may grow tiresome to read, except in several instances where the pattern awkwardly falters. Pictures are in matte, unadorned shades of primary colors enhanced with green and, occasionally, brown. The gentle tale is only mildly engaging but demonstrates that a one-parent family can be loving and accomplished—but they had better check the calendar. Reviewer: Cynthia Levinson
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—This rhyming story humorously details the dreaded weekday-morning routine and its attendant chaos. Nate is the younger of two siblings who live in the suburbs with their mother, Kate. Nate enters her bedroom and flings himself on the bed, alarm clock in hand. They are late! While the retro-style gouache illustrations are vibrant and energetic due to the sophisticated use of complementary colors, large areas of flat hues, and layouts that convey a sense of animation, the writing doesn't entirely deliver. Lines with internal rhyme and alliteration like "They're almost ready, feeling steady,/wearing coats and big backpacks" produce a singsong effect that's too syncopated for the story line. Other lines are simply a mouthful, which could indicate the chock-full schedule, but are not much fun to chew. Nevertheless, there is a lot going for this race-out-the-door plot with its series of obstacles and mini-victories. The illustrated subtext of the dog's and the two cats' morning routine is a hoot. One cat hiding under the sheet as Nate makes his bed, another slyly making off with Nate's sister Maddie's missing socks, the dog successfully begging for Nate's waffle, and many other clever pet antics will win the hearts of young readers. There is also a surprise twist at the end, which asks adults to reflect on the wisdom of our bustling, overburdened schedules.—Sara Lissa Paulson, American Sign Language and English Lower School, New York City
Kirkus Reviews
A single, working mom and her two children oversleep and rush through their morning routine only to discover the shocking truth when they get to school: It is Saturday. Egan's rhyming narrative is cumbersome at times: " ‘It's getting late,' announces Nate. / Kate rolls over, rubs her eyes. / She sits up straight. ‘Oh that's just great. / Not again!' Nate's mother sighs." The harried parent leaps across the double-page spread, dog at her heels, son attached to one hand (he's airborne from the speed). While mom is efficient and her children cooperative, each contributes to the delay. Once outside, Nate's need for his forgotten bunny leads to his slipping on ice, falling into mud and having a meltdown, for instance. Yaccarino's signature gouache caricatures, rendered in flat colors and aerodynamic shapes, are oddly mismatched with the text at this point, and whereas the story has heretofore been a play-by-play description, the stuffed animal is confusingly inserted here without any retrieval scene. The mud puddle, too, is a strange contrivance in relation to the previous page's snow-covered landscape. (Through the kitchen window, the view is green--go figure.) The conclusion is more discomfiting than amusing, given that mom has become "too tense to talk" as she "squeal[s] down streets" in the car. A muddled effort. Kate and Nate can run, run, run, but they do not have much fun. (Picture book. 3-6)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781466818309
  • Publisher: Feiwel & Friends
  • Publication date: 10/16/2012
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: NOOK Kids
  • Pages: 36
  • Age range: 4 - 7 Years
  • File size: 12 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Kate Egan

KATE EGAN is a freelance book editor. She lives in Brunswick, Maine, with her husband and two kids. This is her first picture book and an accurate depiction of most mornings in her household.

DAN YACCARINO is the illustrator of The Belly Book and many other children's books. He lives in New York City with his wife and and their two children. Visit him online at www.yaccarinostudio.com.


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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 23, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Cute story!

    The story is cute, with happy pictures and a nice cover. The letters are clear, with easy-to-read words. This simple story is a great book for preschoolers to own. It’s a good book!

    Review by Bram P., age 5, Greater Los Angeles Area Mensa

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