Katya's World (Strange Chemistry Series #1)

Katya's World (Strange Chemistry Series #1)

3.6 5
by Jonathan L. Howard

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The distant and unloved colony world of Russalka has no land, only the raging sea. No clear skies, only the endless storm clouds. Beneath the waves, the people live in pressurised environments and take what they need from the boundless ocean. It is a hard life, but it is theirs and they fought a war against Earth to protect it. But wars leave wounds that never

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The distant and unloved colony world of Russalka has no land, only the raging sea. No clear skies, only the endless storm clouds. Beneath the waves, the people live in pressurised environments and take what they need from the boundless ocean. It is a hard life, but it is theirs and they fought a war against Earth to protect it. But wars leave wounds that never quite heal, and secrets that never quite lie silent. Katya Kuriakova doesn't care much about ancient history like that, though. She is making her first submarine voyage as crew; the first nice, simple journey of what she expects to be a nice, simple career. There is nothing nice and simple about the deep black waters of Russalka, however; soon she will encounter pirates and war criminals, see death and tragedy at first hand, and realise that her world's future lies on the narrowest of knife edges. For in the crushing depths lies a sleeping monster, an abomination of unknown origin, and when it wakes, it will seek out and kill every single person on the planet.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Yes, horror author Howard’s (the Johannes Cabal series) hard SF story features a dystopian future Earth, but it’s light years away. The inhabitants of the watery planet Russalka, descended from Russian colonists who arrived more than 100 years earlier, have been cut off from the rest of the galaxy ever since their former brethren on Earth tried to reclaim Russalka and destroyed much of the settlers’ technology. Ten years after the brutal aerial attacks, Russalka remains in a state of uneasy militarism and recovery. Nearly 16, Katya Kuriakova is excited about apprenticing on her uncle Lukyan’s submarine, but much goes wrong on her debut voyage, including the sub getting commandeered by a military officer and his pirate prisoner, surprise attacks, and a conspiracy that could threaten all of Russalka. A strong cast and a believable sense of danger drive Howard’s first book for teens (the combination, of course, ensures that many characters do not survive). SF fans looking to stretch their range will find much to love and will look forward to the planned second installment. Ages 13–up. (Nov.)
From the Publisher
“It’s a highly effective, thought-provoking novel, and it left me looking forward to the next volume.” Philip Reeve, author of the Predator Cities series.

“A really well imagined world, detailed and utterly believable, great mix of technical detail and breathless action.”
- Charlie Higson, author of the Young Bond series and the Enemy series.

"So for the alien location the setting seems comfortingly familiar and if you’ve ever enjoyed a submarine based film, give Katya’s World a go. With the scene quickly set, it’s really about the story. There’s feds and pirates and crew just trying to do their job; a world getting by after a war with Earth which may not be as over as everyone thinks. Plus there’s plenty of secrets and double-crossing like any good adventure."
- Ellie, Curiosity Killed The Bookworm

"...for me this is what superior YA fiction is all about."
-Tomorrow's Nostalgia 

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Product Details

Watkins Media
Publication date:
Strange Chemistry Series, #1
Product dimensions:
5.18(w) x 7.70(h) x 0.92(d)
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

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Katya's World 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I truly enjoyed this book. It was entertaining and very interesting. The two stars is not the the book itself, but for all of the errors, missing words, and words typed together with no spaces. At least once per chapter you're trying to piece together either a cut off sentence, or trying to figure out what word is missing in a sentence to make it coherent. Very annoying.
Candace-LoveyDoveyBooks More than 1 year ago
The unique flavor of Katya’s World is one to savor and crave until Jonathan L. Howard hits us with another burst of Katya Kuriakova. The young submarine navigator prodigy has a fresh voice and story that all readers will appreciate. Katya, fifteen almost sixteen years old, embarks on her first job as navigator aboard her Uncle Lukyan’s submarine, Pushkin’s Baby. The simple trip to Lemuria turns into a big production when a Federal Maritime Authority, or FMA, soldier commandeers the ship with a prisoner to be taken to the Deeps. The journey from here introduces Katya to the realities of the war between her people, called the Russalkins, and the Terrans, the people from Earth who funded the colonization of Russalka. Howard does an excellent job building the story right from the beginning. The prologue lays the foundation for Katya’s story with detail, but not too much to make you drool with boredom or feel exasperated that it’s taking so long to be introduced to Katya. Learning the basics of Russalkin history so openly is one thing, but the actual history itself is brilliant. How it all comes together and the role the details behind Russalkin and Terran animosity plays throughout the rest of the story is just one of the many reasons why Howard is surely to become an author to watch within the circle of young adult science fiction writers. It’s very evident that Katya’s World is science-fiction, but since the focus is on submarines and a few space and air crafts, it’s easier to become engrossed in the technology and jargon that supports the story. Then, there’s Katya Kuriakova. Too young to experience death and war first hand, but so much more pragmatic in the danger of battle than even a high ranking FMA soldier. Katya’s character comes as a surprise, and her ability to come to conclusions based on observation and previous knowledge strikes a chord with me. I’m so glad she doesn’t come across as immature, even though she’s the youngest person participating in this journey, and she actually carries her weight in responsibility without prompting. She’s an exciting character to look forward to more and more novels about because she’s so focused on what’s in front of her; there’s no romantic interest to distract her from her indestructible enemy and she knows when it’s time to move forward. Katya’s mind is clear and not filled with nonsensical thoughts or ideas. Howard’s creation is one of a kind and readers will be so curious to learn more about Katya Kuriakova’s next move. The conclusion of Katya’s World is perfect. I try not to say such a statement about the novels I read, but I was literally hanging on to every movement of the last few pages. There’s also a big difference between the Katya from the beginning of the novel, who’s excited to finally be recognized as an adult, to the Katya who’s seen below the surface of the Russalkin society. It feels as though something within Katya has finally emerged to complete who she is. Howard’s final showdown is explosive and thrilling while the aftermath is yet to emerge; leaving no doubt that this is a series to follow! *eGalley provided through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review* Also posted on Lovey Dovey Books
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
EverAfterEsther More than 1 year ago
In a story reminiscent of 10,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Jonathan L. Howard has written a YA book that is very different from the rest. From the setting to the character dynamics, Katya's World is an entertaining read. Reasons to Read: 1. An uncommon setting: Katya lives in Russalka, which is an entire community under the water. Russalka is actually a colony from Earth which has settled on this planet covered in water. Katya has trained as a navigator for submarines (which is how most travel takes place on Russalka). 2. Complex relationships: The most striking feature of this book was how it showcased relationships that are often ignored in YA. Katya has been raised by her uncle since she lost her parents - while an orphaned protagonist isn't uncommon in YA, it is unusual for that adoptive relationship to take such a prominent role in a story. But most intriguing was Katya's relationship with the mysterious Kane; it develops into something unexpected but this happens naturally.  It's interesting that this is a YA book that doesn't have any romantic plot line - while I can easily enjoy a story without romance, you might want to pass on Katya's World if romance is a must for you. Personally, I thought this was a strength of the book and I found that the story was exciting enough without a love story. In some ways, the plot wrapped up a little too neatly for my taste. For such a precarious plan, everything worked out rather conveniently. And while I thought Katya was an interesting character, she felt more like a narrator than an active participant in the story. But the inclusion of submarines and some underwater warfare was fascinating. There's a lot of politics surrounding the events which take place in Katya's World, but the setting gave it such a fresh feel. ARC received from publisher for review; no other compensation was received. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sort of a futuristic Hunt for Red October but with a kickass girl protagonist and a refreshing lack of teen romance.