Katzenjammer: Soon to Be a Major Motion Picture

( 18 )

Overview

Katzenjammer is the story of a first-time novelist struggling in New York. The book's main character, Max Perkins, feels cursed by having the same name as that of the famous editor to Hemingway, Wolfe, and Fitzgerald. Max's attempts to get recognized finally land him in the readers' department of Bandomday Books where the plot to get his book published takes on mind-bending twists and turns, eventually becoming a Faustian comical journey. Encompassing everything from Russian pianists, male prostitution, and ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers and in stores.

Pick Up In Store Near You

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (14) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $35.48   
  • Used (13) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$35.48
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(334)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Katzenjammer is the story of a first-time novelist struggling in New York. The book's main character, Max Perkins, feels cursed by having the same name as that of the famous editor to Hemingway, Wolfe, and Fitzgerald. Max's attempts to get recognized finally land him in the readers' department of Bandomday Books where the plot to get his book published takes on mind-bending twists and turns, eventually becoming a Faustian comical journey. Encompassing everything from Russian pianists, male prostitution, and insane bosses, to the Mormon religion, the New York arts scene, hermaphrodites, dwarfs, and the inner workings of corporate America, Katzenjammer is a scathing, hilarious, and quixotic look at what it takes to get published today.

A scathing, quixotic, and Faustian look at the Publishing Industry, Jackson McCrae's new novel Katzenjammer takes us into the mind of Max Perkins-a first-time movie-obsessed novelist attempting to get his work published in New York. In this, his third book, McCrae strips away the media-created and hyped veneer of being a published author and shows us what it really takes to get your book on the bestseller list. The result is not always pretty but it is highly informative, hilarious, and above all, entertaining. Encompassing everything from Russian pianists, male prostitution, and insane bosses, to the Mormon religion, the New York arts scene, hermaphrodites, dwarfs, and the inner workings of corporate America, Katzenjammer is a ribald and adventurous romp through New York, publishing, and the world of books.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780971553637
  • Publisher: Enolam Group Inc
  • Publication date: 8/1/2005
  • Pages: 366
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Read an Excerpt

Excerpt from Katzenjammer: Soon To Be A Major Motion Picture by Jackson Tippett McCrae.

In order to test the editor, I typed out a complete chapter of Huckleberry Finn--a chapter from the middle of the book. Then I presented it, along with the statement, "I'm working on something new as you've convinced me that my current novel isn't any good."

"This is a perfect example of what I'm talking about," she started in after skimming Twain's work right in front of me. "You're telling the story instead of showing. As this stands now, you'd never get it published. Your use of English is deplorable, and the phrase is African-American--not nigger. And why would anyone want to read about the Mississippi River anyway?"

The next week I tried a chapter from Faulkner's Light in August.

"Boy, do you need to learn to write!" she said, settling onto the sofa. "You're lucky you came to me. I can really help you with this sort of thing. Do you even know what a sentence is supposed to sound like?"

Truman Capote's In Cold Blood was next.

"People don't generally like reading about this sort of thing," she said, her eyebrows up. "You'd be hard-pressed to find a publisher for it but if you agree to work with me for the next year-payment in advance-I should be able to help you whip it into shape. We have to start by taking out all the violence. That never sells." And then she added, "Just how many examples of your bad writing attempts do you have?"

Her response to three complete chapters from Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea, again typed out so as not to look suspicious, garnered the comment, "Didn't you do anything interesting at all on your summervacation?"

In an attempt to see just how far I could push the envelope, I began to send samples of famous books to various publishers, reasoning that they were as inept as my editor. I attached my name and a different title, just to see how they would react. I knew that the samples would either be ignored, read by some ignorant twenty-year-old whose idea of great literature was the Peanuts comic strip, or given the proverbial "shove-off" letter. Strangely enough, I actually got back responses instead of the usual form letters. Perhaps it had something to do with the fact that I lied about having an agent and being wealthy enough to fund my own marketing campaign.

For the first three chapters of Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, which I called Morning Aubade, I received the response, "Works like this are generally not publishable and there has never really been a market for this type of thing."

In response to the complete Nine Short Stories by Salinger (it took me two weeks to retype them all), I received, "We are not in the habit of printing the work of fifth-graders. May we suggest a writing course at your local junior college?"

And then there was the response to Steinbeck's last three chapters from The Grapes of Wrath which I had re-titled California Dreamin'.

"We suggest you try one of the lesser-known publishing houses for a work of this genre as the market for this type of thing is usually small. Also, you may want to change the ending as the breast-feeding of the hobo is a bit over the top."

One acquisitions editor at a major house even had the intelligence to recognize the name Max Perkins and accuse me of pretending to be someone I wasn't. "I happen to know the real Max Perkins," she wrote, "and as soon as I put this letter in the post, I'm calling him up and letting him know that you're using his name." I wanted to wish the acquisitions editor luck as the Max Perkins she was referring to had been dead at that point for forty-three years.

But the best response was given by one of the city's most elite houses, which, after I had sent in the book of Genesis from the Bible-double-spaced and in twelve-point type, just as they had requested-wrote back with the pithy quip, "Dear Mr. Perkins, if you insist on plagiarizing Shakespeare, we suggest you at least give him credit for his 'creation' somewhere along the way."

So it was confirmed: No one in publishing knew anything.

Excerpted from Katzenjammer: Soon To Be A Major Motion Picture by Jackson Tippett McCrae. Copyright © 2005. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 18 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(16)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2007

    Absurdism at work---danger

    I love the writers who are not afraid to let their hair down. Vonnegut, Palahniuk, Evanovich, Sedaris, just to name a few. And Mccrae is another one. This book is a conglomeration of everything from thuggy New York to a mental hospital. Overall, a very good job at keeping the public entertained

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2007

    A reviewer

    What a great way to spend an afternoon. Couldn't put this down. Fun, funny, funnier, fantastic. If you want to laugh, this is your book. Would recommend to anyone who has an off-color sense of humour.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2007

    A reviewer

    I would vote this book most likely to make it to the top of any list. Some will find the borderline risque humour a bit off-putting, but if you're read Running With Scissors or Sellevision, then this book will look like an elegant novel to you. The writing is so smoothe and winning. I was won over by the first five pages.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2007

    Great second novel

    For some reason, I didn't find this book to be as edgy or new as some others have. I was just a very entertaining story, with some colorful words here and there, and a bizarre ending. Not like anything else I've ever read, and that is a good thing.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2007

    Mamapappa's book pick this week!

    Rarely does a book excite me. i've given up on the bestseller list. But this one proved to be a find. I'm passing it on to all my friends. My favorite part is where the writer in the book takes on critics and gives us some great examples of just how illiterate they can be! Great plot, great characters. Great everything.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2007

    A story as confusing as it's Title.

    The book was hard to trudge through and most of the time I didn't understand why I cared to finish. It must have been morbid curiosity. It took too long for the author to explain why things were so helter skelter. If you like those kinds of tales where you remain confused and befuddled until 300 pages later... then you'll love it. I gave it a two out of five because at least I didn't abandon it which I have done before with books that weren't worth the time in my life that I would never get back.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2007

    A reviewer

    Some of the plot points in the book are humorous, but the book on the whole simply isn't funny. The humor is forced or cheap, and a lot of it feels as if it might have been funny in theory but lost the spark because it was put on paper so clumsily. It's unfortunate, because several drafts later, this might have been a very good book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2007

    Brilliant work of art

    I bought this book expecting it to be a simple beach read for summer . . . and I got that. But I also got much more. Finely crafted, there are stories within stories, harkening back to McCrae's first book, 'Dogwood' with its strange host of characters and situations that, in any other author's hands, would seem unbelievable. What I enjoyed most about Katzenjammer was that I could relate to the insane bosses that the main character--Max Perkins--had. Also, the portrait of New York City and all that goes with it is right on target. This book is often spoken of in the same breath as David Sedaris's 'Me Talk Pretty' or 'One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest' for obvious reasons. If Sedaris wrote novels with complicated plots, they would turn out like 'Katzenjammer' and of course the references to mental illness in 'One Flew Over' are so similar to those in 'Katz.' This is the second book I've read by this author and I'll be reading more by him. A talented writer who comes up with plots that twist and turn like nothing else. If you want to laugh, this is the book for you.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2007

    A reviewer

    With a comedial sense of purpose that I so often crave in a book, Katzenjammer was one such foray into the land of fun and lit that did not disappoint. So many have tried to tell other readers what this book is like, comparing it to Sedaris, Palahniuk, and others, but that is simply a way to get you to understand that this book not only holds up as well as some by those aforementioned authors, but is actually better. For me, reading Katzenjammer was like nothing else. I was amazed that the story was so good, but, usually with a great story comes either bad writing, or some other problems. This was not what I found with McCrae's latest novel. The layering of ideas is just phenomenal and frankly, I don't know how the author achieved this. The main character, Max Perkins, has so much baggage that he could start his own airport lost and found, and add to that the fact that he has the same name as a famous editor of famous authors, and you've got a recipe for absurdity and fun. But it was the other characters that really made the book for me: the sleazy story editor--Reeda Rot--whose anitics to glean money from poor Max is a book in itself. Then there's the director of off-off-off Broadway productions and his craziness, yet another entire book. One of the main characters is Robert Hickenlooper, whose last name is the same as a famous American pianist from the early twentieth century, who changed her name to Samarov so that she could be more marketable--as a Russian pianist. And herein lies the basic seed of Katzenjammer, for it is truly about getting published and getting recognition in a world gone mad not only with books, but with graft, corruption, and hypocracy. McCrae paints wonderful portraits of irate bosses, demon-like politicians, and even everyday co-workers. Possibly the most disturbing element of this book is that it rang so true for me--especially the sections on working with lunatics. The writing, believe it or not for this type of book that has this type of themes, is actually exquisite. I mean, VERY literate and urbane. Sophisticated one minute and rollicking the next. My only criticism of the novel was that I wasn't able to put it down---something my husband and children found quite irritating. Still, I read the book in two days, so they only had to wait that long! My one suggestion for those who like black comedy and dry humor is that you read this fascinating and weird novel. Surprise twisted ending also makes this the dessert you can't get enough of

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2007

    Based on the truth

    Found this book at my gym--someone had been reading it. Started in and couldn't put it down. What a weird, wonderful world McCrae has created, but the really strange part is that it's based on the truth. Anyone who has ever worked in NYC knows that bosses are this crazy, and looking for an apartment is not easy. Fun and quick to read, it's worth the money

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2007

    A reviewer

    If you liked the books 'Running with Scissors' and Sedaris's works, then you'll LOVE this book. It's as if those authors took their ideas and experiences and put them all together to form a cohesive Faustian fable set in late '80s New York. The book holds together well and it's a quick and fun read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2007

    One big puzzle

    Think of a brilliant and colorful puzzle, all put into place. Now, take that puzzle and throw it in the air so that the pieces scatter. Hold that image of the pieces, suspended in mid-air. NOW, reverse this, and you've got 'Katzenjammer.' It's as if the author wrote the story and then deconstructed it--took it apart so that we'd get the tale piece by piece. A first rate performance. The writing is brilliant and there's not a flaw in the plot. No holes here, and a fun and fast read. THREE thumbs up! If you've got 'em!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2007

    Number one

    For those starved for something totally new and exciting, this is your book. The form, as with all of Jackson McCrae's books, is great and mind bending. Weird and twisted, Katzenjammer will make you think about how the world works--or doesn't.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2007

    If you like Sedaris and Palahniuk

    If you like the works of Sedaris and Palahnkuk, then you'll love this book. If you're one for a cute fuzzy read, this ain't it. My favorite parts include the apartment hunting descriptions and the bosses from hades--something everyone can relate to. Great stuff.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2006

    A first-rate writer--new voice for our generation

    Having read the author's first book I eagerly awaited the second (or in this case, third) novel. McCrae is a master at reinventing himself and avoiding writing the same book over and over as so many other authors do. Enter this book. About the only other connection to his previous work is the fact that he chooses a famous (or in this case, semi-famous) person from history to tie his book together. In his first novel it was Truman Capote with a dash of Helen Keller on the side. In 'Katzenjammer' it is Max Perkins-famous editor to Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and a host of others. The story line is this: A would-be writer arrives in New York City, trying to get published. Actually, before he can do that he has to find a place to live and a job-something not so easy if you have no connections, especially in a place like New York. He gets taken in (literally and figuratively) by a family of Mormons and that in itself could be its own book. Going from job to job and apartment to apartment, Max is slowly worn down. Add on top of this his attempts to get an agent, a publisher, or anyone to notice his book (which by the way is titled 'Mrs. Squigglemire's Bustle'-that's another story altogether) and you've got incident upon incident piled higher and higher until things get hysterically funny. Of special note will be the apartment/roommate hunting portions of the book, as well as the 'trying to get a job in New York City' portions which will make you cringe if you've ever lived in NYC and/or tried to get a job there-especially if you don't have connections. What may seem like 'just an interesting story' at times will turn into much more as you get farther into the book. Characters who you thought were just someone passing through will turn out to hold the keys to major changes in the protagonist's life. As with all of McCrae's works, there are layers and layers of metaphors, inside jokes, and puns. Also, McCrae has woven into the text various references to art, music, and above all, movies, and these figure into the plot(s) and character development. Possibly my favorite part of the book deals with the final two chapters and epilogue where McCrae ties in all of the plot lines, characters, and jokes. How anyone could think this stuff up is beyond me, but he does, and does it with great success. If you're looking for a great, funny, page turner, this is it. Some of my favorite characters in the book: Robert Hickenlooper, the escort(red buzz cut hair, muscles, tattoo) who is coolness to perfection-well, until you get farther along in the novel. Then there's Kaplan F, the ding-bat conductor of off-off-off Broadway musicals (off-off-off as in 'New Jersey'). His antics will keep you vacillating between laughing and cringing at his 'all-too-familiar-like' boss motives. These two are the most memorable, but there are tons more. Pros: A quick, easy, fun read. Cons: Was over too soon-wished it had been longer!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 5, 2005

    What makes an author great?

    A question that has been asked many times. For me, it's someone who can write well and knows how to weave a story or multiple stories together. But it's more than that: It's someone who writes from the heart and makes you feel, even if the majority of the book is humorous. Enter Jackson McCrae. Katzenjammer is about one man's struggle to survive in a world gone mad. No, that may not be the most original premise, but what the author does with this is incredible. We're taken through the land of incompetents and mental health professionals, corrupt bosses, and users and abusers to such an extent that the entire endeavor becomes one hilarious scene after another. Of special interest will be the scenes where the main character attempts to get his book published. The references to popular movies and other works of art makes this a complex and complete meal in itself. Don't miss this one!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2005

    Brilliant second novel

    This author never ceases to amaze me. First, I read his 'Bark of the Dogwood' with its complex themes and intertwining of characters and realtionships. Now he gives us a modern foray into mental illness, split personalities, the New York arts and publishing scenes, and anything and everything in between. The chapters are very short and this book just flies by! You might be a lot of things, but disappointed is not one of them. Anyone who has ever been slighted by society, a job, boss, or just another person will appreciate the revenge factor that the main character indulges in.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2005

    Amazing

    I was amazed at how itricate and entertaining this novel is. Told through the eyes of Max Perkins (who, incidently, is named after the famous Max Perkins of editor fame--Wolfe, Hemingway, and Fitzgerald) this hilarious and on-the-edge romp through New York, the world of publishing, and everything inbetween will keep you riveted, page after page. Short chapters and a plot that flies along make this one a sure winner. I highly recommend it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)