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Kay Fanning's Alaska Story: Memoir of a Pulitzer Prize-Winning Newspaper Publisher on America's Northern Frontier
     

Kay Fanning's Alaska Story: Memoir of a Pulitzer Prize-Winning Newspaper Publisher on America's Northern Frontier

by Kay Fanning, Katherine Field Stephen
 

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Kay Woodruff Field, 38, an ex-debutante once called "the Grace Kelly of Chicago," loaded her three children into a battered station wagon and headed north to Alaska in 1965 after her divorce. Looking for a new life, she found it at the Anchorage Daily News, a morning newspaper struggling against the powerful Anchorage Times, voice of the establishment.

Overview


Kay Woodruff Field, 38, an ex-debutante once called "the Grace Kelly of Chicago," loaded her three children into a battered station wagon and headed north to Alaska in 1965 after her divorce. Looking for a new life, she found it at the Anchorage Daily News, a morning newspaper struggling against the powerful Anchorage Times, voice of the establishment. She and her new husband, Larry Fanning, bought the News, ignoring predictions that the paper wouldn't survive. Kay explained later: "Profit is not the purpose of the press..the free, unfettered flow of ideas is." Public interest became the paper's specialty. This is the story of a courageous publisher who backed gun control, environmental protection, and Native rights - controversial issues in a conservative state. Fanning refused to bend under pressure from advertisers and politicians, and won a Pulitzer Prize. Kay Fanning died before finishing her memoir. Eighteen personal stories about her written by friends and colleagues complete the portrait of a gracious, compassionate, and persistent newspaperwoman of integrity who left an indelible mark on Alaska.

Editorial Reviews

Former debutante Kay Fanning was once described as "the Grace Kelly of Chicago," but she didn't allow her stellar associations to interfere with her real-world pursuits. In 1965, divorcée Kay loaded her three children and belongings into a station wagon and headed to Alaska for a fresh start. She took a job at the struggling Anchorage Daily News; within a short time, she and her new husband owned the paper. Even though he died shortly after the purchase, Kay stayed on, acting as both editor and publisher; by 1976, the Daily News had already become Alaska's largest newspaper and received a coveted Pulitzer Prize. This memoir -- "with a little help from Kay's friends" -- combines Fanning's account of her own life with 17 stories about her penned by people who knew her.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780974501475
Publisher:
Epicenter Press, Incorporated
Publication date:
10/28/2006
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.65(d)
Age Range:
14 Years

Meet the Author


Kay Fanning loved journalism. She served as editor and publisher of the Anchorage Daily News, editor of the Christian Science Monitor, and first woman president of the American Society of Newspaper Editors. Katherine Field Stephen, herself a reporter, was determined to finish her mother’s book. And she did, by inviting eighteen of Kay’s friends and colleagues to contribute personal stories about Kay Fanning.

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