Keep on Moving: The Best of Angelique Kidjo

Keep on Moving: The Best of Angelique Kidjo

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by Angélique Kidjo
     
 

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She's a star the length and breadth of Africa as well as in Europe, but Angélique Kidjo's continuing anonymity in the U.S. remains a mystery. The Beninoise firecracker has been the recipient of dogged label support, lavish artist tributes, high-profile gigs, and is blessed with a huge voice and restless pop vision. Perhaps these last two, and the efforts of a

Overview

She's a star the length and breadth of Africa as well as in Europe, but Angélique Kidjo's continuing anonymity in the U.S. remains a mystery. The Beninoise firecracker has been the recipient of dogged label support, lavish artist tributes, high-profile gigs, and is blessed with a huge voice and restless pop vision. Perhaps these last two, and the efforts of a new label, Columbia, coupled with a summer 2001 tour with Dave Matthews and Macy Gray, will propel Kidjo into the limelight where she belongs. At the very least, they make Keep on Moving a rollicking introduction to a real African diva. Front-loaded with Kidjo's English-language covers (one of the fistful of languages she's fluent in), "Summertime" and an audacious take on Hendrix's "Voodoo Chile," this best-of is calculated to lessen Kidjo's world music otherness in exchange for an international pop profile. And why not? She holds her own alongside guests Kelly Price ("Open Your Eyes") and Carlos Santana ("Naïma"), and as these selections from all five of her albums prove, her programming-pumped drum sound has shown an affinity for house music and hip-hop from day one. At the least, Keep on Moving delivers on its titular promise. And with any luck, it'll earn Angélique Kidjo the respect she deserves.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - JT Griffith
Angélique Kidjo's greatest-hits CD is a broad introduction to the popular African world music artist, whose styles include Zairean rhumba, reggae, jazz, funk, zouk, and makossa, and zilin vocals. Designed to condense her career down to one disc, Keep on Moving: The Best of Angelique Kidjo is a record for new fans. The disc contains 17 songs from her five full-length albums from the 1990s and one previously unavailable track. More than any other Kidjo release, Keep on Moving showcases the burgeoning relationship between modern African music and American soul. As energetic and upbeat as some of the tracks on this album are, Angélique Kidjo is equally represented here by ballads like "Fifa." While all 18 tracks are good, this collection has a somewhat schizophrenic feel. The decade-long evolution from African-infused rock to more R&B and pop songs seems jarring in the span of 74 minutes. Afro-pop dance songs like "Agolo," "Babalao," and "Aye" seem almost out of place next to some of the set's bluesy and spare numbers. The track order is not chronological either, and a longtime fan will tell when a track from 1991 gives way to one from 1998. Since Kidjo's albums are not singles-oriented, Keep on Moving lacks the unified mood of her best albums. Often a "Greatest Hits" or a "Best Of" compilation collects all the good material an artist has to offer and becomes a band's only essential release. (Famous examples include the Spin Doctors' Just Go Ahead Now or Duran Duran's Decade.) Keep on Moving might be the first Kidjo CD for some people, but it only scratches the surface of her rich catalog. Keep on Moving is a very good sampler of her career, but doesn't contain all of Kidjo's best songs. This disc should serve as an invitation to discover the rest of her music. This Best Of has only one song from her debut. Parakou, three from Oremi, four each from Logozo and Aye, and five from Fifa. What is included, however, is exciting. Of interest to new fans will be Kidjo's pop collaborations: "Naima" with rocker Carlos Santana and "Open Your Eyes" with hip-hop star Kelly Price. Other standout songs include "Malika," her creative take on Jimi Hendrix's "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)," and a cover of George Gershwin's "Summertime." Use this as a beginning point, but keep in mind that their are other great hits not included here, including her Cassandra Wilson duet "Never Know," "Easy as Life" from Elton John's Aida, and "Ife," which is only available on Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls. Keep on Moving might be the best introduction to the wonderful world of Angélique Kidjo but Oremi is still her best record.
Billboard
...Kidjo has effortlessly connected the dots of the globe's diverse musical landscapes.

Product Details

Release Date:
07/01/2008
Label:
Wrasse Records
UPC:
0875232006928
catalogNumber:
30
Rank:
76975

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Angélique Kidjo   Primary Artist,Vocals
Wah-Wah Watson   Guitar
Carlos Santana   Track Performer
Kelly Price   Track Performer
Thierry Vaton   Piano,fender rhodes

Technical Credits

David Z.   Producer,Engineer
Joe Galdo   Producer
Jean Hébrail   Programming,Producer
Jimi Hendrix   Composer
Angélique Kidjo   Liner Notes,Instrumentation
Will Mowat   Producer
Brian Poer   Engineer
Ron Lowe   Engineer
Christian Lachenal   Programming
Chris Habeck   Engineer
Ed Gerrard   Management
Brad Goodman   Producer
Peter Himberger   Management
Bella-Bellow   Composer

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Keep on Moving: The Best of Angelique Kidjo 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I THINK THIS IS A GREAT ALBUM FOR THOSE PEOPLE WHO ARE GETTING TO KNOW THE BEAUTIFUL AFRICAN SOUNDS. IT'S EVEN COOL FOR SOME YOUNGER AUDIENCES, BECAUSE IT IS A MIX OF POP WITH AFRICAN MUSIC. IF YOU'RE A FAN OF WORLD MUSIC, YOU MUST LISTEN TO MISS KIDJO. PEACE.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This album was my first taste of Angelique Kidjo. It was given to me by a friend. What an amazing artist. Sweet,rough,and very very dancable music from beginning to end. This ''best of'' album is a must have for any collection.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was in a store and heard Angelique Kidjo's version of ''Summertime'' playing. I could have sworn it was Miriam Mkabe - they sound very similar. I love this CD, I dance to it all the time :) She's got a neat mix of styles - African, Latin, French, jazz, even some pop music (but not too much pop that it hurts to listen to the singing.) I especially like her song with Santana...