Keep the River on Your Right

Keep the River on Your Right

5.0 1
by Tobias Schneebaum
     
 

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In 1955, armed with a penknife and instructions to keep the river on his right, Brooklyn-born artist Tobias Schneebaum set off into the jungles of Peru in search of a tribe of cannibals. Forgoing all contact with civilization, he lived as a brother with the Akaramas –– shaving and painting his body, hunting with Stone Age weapons, sleeping in the warmth

Overview


In 1955, armed with a penknife and instructions to keep the river on his right, Brooklyn-born artist Tobias Schneebaum set off into the jungles of Peru in search of a tribe of cannibals. Forgoing all contact with civilization, he lived as a brother with the Akaramas –– shaving and painting his body, hunting with Stone Age weapons, sleeping in the warmth of the body-pile.

Editorial Reviews

George De Stefano
An engrossing, often astonishing account of Schneebaum's experience among a tribe living a Stone Age existence deep in the Madre de Dios rainforest of eastern Peru.
Nation

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802131331
Publisher:
Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
Publication date:
01/28/1994
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
184
Sales rank:
1,143,505
Product dimensions:
5.41(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.56(d)

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Keep the River on Your Right 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I saw the movie Keep the River on Your Right: A MOdern cannibal Tale in NYC yesterday - and immediately reread this book which I've had on my shelf for 20 years. The book is harrowing and lovely. And the new documentary which is in theaters this year across the country was startlingly good. All the critics of Schneebaum should be silenced now - thise arrogant to inists the academics always get it right, and not those who come to the world viewing people as people and not animals to be studied. Schneebaum had a few cultural mistakes like thinking he was called Habe, meaning the ignorant one, but (and this is hilarious) Habe, when the tribe was asked 45 years later, turned out to mean 'Come here!' I'd recommend Keep the River on Your Right to anyone, but not to up themselves rightous types who are blind to compelling evidence.