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Keeper Of The Cross
     

Keeper Of The Cross

5.0 2
by Nathan Barber
 

Follow a young English crusader named Beck as he sets out on the adventure of a lifetime. After an encounter with Richard the Lionheart in the Holy Land, Beck returns to England with two objectives: safeguard two pieces of the True Cross and battle the treachery of Prince John until King Richard returns from the Crusade. Complicated by Richard's capture on

Overview

Follow a young English crusader named Beck as he sets out on the adventure of a lifetime. After an encounter with Richard the Lionheart in the Holy Land, Beck returns to England with two objectives: safeguard two pieces of the True Cross and battle the treachery of Prince John until King Richard returns from the Crusade. Complicated by Richard's capture on the continent, Beck's objectives prove to be both elusive and perilous, and Beck is forced to lay his life on the line, as well as the lives of those around him, if he is to succeed on his knight's errand. Set on the sun-scorched plains of the Holy Land in the midst of the Third Crusade and in an unstable England facing treachery at the highest levels, Keeper of the Cross is an epic tale of a common man attempting uncommon feats against all odds.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781413721362
Publisher:
Publish America
Publication date:
05/15/2004
Pages:
166
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.38(d)

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Keeper Of The Cross 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The thing that works so well about Keeper of the Cross is that the reader is learning without realizing it. I really believe this novel could be used in a classroom setting for World History or something else related.
Even though I have read non-fiction books concerning the Crusades, such as Steven Sora¿s The Lost Treasure of the Knights of the Templar, I never fully absorbed all of the information due to the non-fiction style of writing. With Keeper of the Cross, it¿s easier to follow Beck¿s character and become `involved in the fight.¿
Before reading the novel, I could tell you a quick synopsis on the Crusades. But after reading about Beck¿s adventures, I can tell you more in intricate detail about the Crusades, King Richard, and John¿s betrayal. The best part of that is that I didn¿t realize I was learning.
Another reason this could work in the classroom is that there is no bad language, no disturbing violence, and no sex or nudity (though it would have been nice on the honeymoon, zing!). I read it in two sittings, and each chapter had me heading to the next. Barber writes in a smooth, flowing style that is easy to keep going or to pick up the book the next day.
Perfect length as well¿I remember wanting to hang myself halfway through the historical fiction John Adams and I still haven¿t finished it. Bottom line: Was I entertained? Yes. Was this worth $19.95 (aka 3 hours of work at GNC)? Yes. Did I learn anything? Yes. Will I read Nathan Barber again? You betcha.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am a Sir Walter Scott fan and his methodology and techniques have always captured the feeling of that time for me. I have not seen a modern book that could transpose the fervor and heat of that time into a framework readily understood by our 'instant gratification' generation successfully before now. Congratulations on that achievement! Keeper of the Cross takes an age-old theme (the common man forced to reach inside himself and find the hero) juxtaposes it on a time in history where life was often brutally short, animates the internal and external struggle in the rapt eye of the reader, and creates a masterpiece. From the first few paragraphs that introduce Beck and Richard to the end of the book, each plot and sub-plot is skillfully woven around and through the others. I found myself actively engaged in the characters, cheering them on as they attempted to achieve the impossible quest. The theme of someone dedicating their life to an errand imposed on them by external forces and accepting that as their goal, brings back the finer points of knighthood and chivalry. One of the things that have made history 'real' to the reviewer has been that it is made up of small causes with large effects created by human beings and their actions. The tiniest factor can create ripples felt down through the years. Keeper of the Cross takes one small facet of the Crusades, a knight named Beck, relates his story and through that telling, transports the reader right into the sweeping changes of the era. This book is skillfully written, carefully crafted, and well thought out. It is a journey into the past as timely and timeless as history itself. Well done, extremely well done. Carol M Chapman, Author Tall Ears and Short Tales: Observations From the Barn