Keepers

Keepers

by Jeri Hanel Watts, Felicia Marshall
     
 

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Kenyon loves to listen to his grandmother's stories almost as much as he loves to play baseball. He'd like Little Dolly to designate him the next Keeper of the family lore, but she tells him the honor is reserved for girls. Setting out to buy a 90th birthday gift for Little Dolly, Kenyon instead falls for a new baseball glove for himself. As regret weighs down his

Overview

Kenyon loves to listen to his grandmother's stories almost as much as he loves to play baseball. He'd like Little Dolly to designate him the next Keeper of the family lore, but she tells him the honor is reserved for girls. Setting out to buy a 90th birthday gift for Little Dolly, Kenyon instead falls for a new baseball glove for himself. As regret weighs down his heart, he confides his shame to his father, who tells him that you can only learn from your mistakes. Just when Kenyon thinks he's run out of ideas for Little Dolly's gift, inspiration hits.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Judy Silverman
This is a wonderful, warm family story on several levels. Kenyon's grandmother, Little Dolly, is the family "keeper," holding "the stories of the past until it's time to pass them on." Only girls can be keepers, she tells Kenyon when he asks if he can be the next keeper. Kenyon wants to get Little Dolly a ninetieth birthday present, but before he knows it he's spent all his money on a baseball glove. How can he even hope to be the next keeper if he can't be trusted with his own money? He is, fortunately, able to talk with his father and take some very good advice. His present for Little Dolly is unique, and young readers just might be inspired to copy Kenyon.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 2-4Kenyon lives with his widowed father and his grandmother, Little Dolly. She is a Keeper, a female member of the family who "holds on to the past until she can pass it on to the next." Kenyon loves her, her stories, and baseball. His love of the game provides the impetus for the story. Little Dolly's 90th birthday is approaching and Kenyon has saved his money to buy her a gift. Before he can make a decision about it, however, he sees the perfect baseball gloveand he buys it. Now he must grapple with his conscience, and with not having a present for Little Dolly. His father's words are comforting, but they do not erase the boy's guilt. Precocious children may guess what he decides to give his grandmother (the illustrations give the best clues)a handmade book of her storiesbut nothing distracts from the celebration. In fact, when the woman receives her gift, she decides that Kenyon can become a Keeper. The bright, acrylic illustrations, most of them full-page, take readers through the house, the small shops on Main street, and other parts of the neighborhood, to the story's ending on the family's porch. The characters are African Americans, and Little Dolly explains that the Keeper tradition goes back to Africa, but the book's theme of the loving, giving, and sharing between grandparent and child is universal. A warm, touching story.Marie Wright, University Library, Indianapolis, IN

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781880000588
Publisher:
Lee & Low Books, Inc.
Publication date:
09/28/2000
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
50
Product dimensions:
8.75(w) x 10.32(h) x 0.43(d)
Lexile:
AD580L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 Years

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