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Keepin' the Summer Alive/The Beach Boys '85
     

Keepin' the Summer Alive/The Beach Boys '85

3.0 3
by The Beach Boys
 
Keepin' the Summer Alive, originally released in 1980, is a somewhat hollow attempt to recapture the Beach Boys' fun-in-the-sun heyday, but the material and its execution are generally too weak to achieve that goal. Still, Carl Wilson's catchy title song stands out, as does the ancient Brian Wilson outtake "When Girls Get Together," and the band's harmonies

Overview

Keepin' the Summer Alive, originally released in 1980, is a somewhat hollow attempt to recapture the Beach Boys' fun-in-the-sun heyday, but the material and its execution are generally too weak to achieve that goal. Still, Carl Wilson's catchy title song stands out, as does the ancient Brian Wilson outtake "When Girls Get Together," and the band's harmonies sound typically fine. The 1985 release The Beach Boys takes a different route entirely, submerging the band -- with Brian back on board but now minus Dennis, who had drowned two years earlier -- in a wash of then-trendy synths and drum machines. Aside from the buoyant Mike Love-penned hit "Getcha Back," the material is mostly forgettable, making this one of the band's least essential efforts.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - John Bush
Rating the Beach Boys' later catalog is often a comparison game, and the next-to-last installment in Capitol's two-fer reissue program (M.I.U. Album/L.A. (Light Album) sounds positively glorious compared to the final two-fer, composed of 1980's Keepin' the Summer Alive and 1985's The Beach Boys. The band-in-a-bubble cover design of Keepin' the Summer Alive makes for a good (though unintended) symbol of the era, in which the band shut itself off from any innovation or hope for commercial success (and undoubtedly prompted a parade of life-support jokes). After sounding equally tired and out-of-the-loop when they covered oldies as when they wrote original songs, these two LPs recycle a host of songs from the '70s. Bruce Johnston returns to the group as producer. There are a few highlights here -- "Endless Harmony" and the surprising Top 40 hit "Getcha Back." [In 2000, Keepin' the Summer Alive was made available on the two-fer compilation Keepin' the Summer Alive/The Beach Boys '85.]

Product Details

Release Date:
09/04/2000
Label:
Emi Europe Generic
UPC:
0724352794829
catalogNumber:
5279482

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Beach Boys   Primary Artist
Victor Feldman   Percussion
Jimmy Lyons   Guitar
Bruce Johnston   Piano
Joe Chemay   Bass
Bob Alcivar   Strings,Horn
Mike Baird   Drums
Harry Betts   Strings,Horn
Ed Carter   Bass,Guitar
Bob Esty   Synthesizer
Bobby Figueroa   Drums
Steve Foreman   Percussion
Scott Mathews   Drums,Vocals
Carlos Munoz   Piano
Joel Peskin   Alto Saxophone
John Philip Shenale   oberheim
Richie Zito   Guitar
Gary Mallaber   Drums
Jim Guercio   Bass

Technical Credits

Beach Boys   Producer
Brian Wilson   Composer
Bruce Johnston   Producer
Mike Love   Composer
Terry Melcher   Composer
Paul Atkinson   Producer,Reissue
Curt Becher   Producer,Engineer
Dennis Diken   Liner Notes
Bill Fletcher   Engineer
Chuck Leary   Engineer
Earle Mankey   Engineer
Joel Moss   Engineer
Tom Murphy   Engineer
Cheryl Pawelski   Producer,Reissue
Andrew Sandoval   Tape Research
Greg Venable   Engineer
Jeff Guercio   Engineer
Jim Guercio   Producer
Tony Lane   Art Direction
Bryan Kelley   Producer

Customer Reviews

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Keepin' the Summer Alive/The Beach Boys '85 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ther's a difference between Beach Boys' fans and casual listener/reviewers. If you're a fan there is enough here to justify owning this release. There are 4 or 5 on the 1985 album that have that hit sound, including "California Calling" and "Getcha' Back" along with 3 or 4 on the 1980 album. I remember buying a lot of albums just to get 2 or 3 gems!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is probably the least appealing pairing of the recent slew of Beach Boys two-fers, but even so, it has its moments. 1980's Keepin' The Summer Alive may well be their worst album: the group sounds tired, bored, at odds, and the music definitely suffers. Even the usually reliable Carl Wilson can't pick things up: his title track and ''Livin' WIth A Heartache'' just miss the mark. But, amazingly, Brian phoned in two great songs: ''Sunshine'' and ''Goin' On,'' and those and Johnston's schmaltzy ''Endless Harmony'' (with some stunning vocal work at the end) are really the only reasons to give this one a listen.

The word on Beach Boys '85 was that the technology squeezed all of the soul out of the songs, at least what there was to begin with. I find that an unfair assessment. While this set certainly suffers from overproduction (the album was produced by Steve Levine) and while some of the songs are trite and forgettable (''Getcha Back,'' ''California Calling''), a lot of 85 is surprisingly good: Jardine's vocal on the beautiful ''I Do Love You'' (written and all instruments played by Stevie Wonder, fergawdsake!), Carl's achingly gorgeous ''Where I Belong'' and soulful ''It's Gettin' Late,'' and Brian's silly ''Crack At Your Love'' and ''Male Ego,'' the latter of which proved that he and cousin Mike could put down their lawyers and do a good new song. Like a lot of their latter-day stuff, '85 won't be at the top of your Beach Boys playlist. But it does contain enough decent music to not simply be ignored.

Guest More than 1 year ago
Even Non-Fans may be surprised that they can appreciate the 1985 album called ''The Beach Boys''. There are several really catchy tunes here and while the computer driven drums of the day are overdone, some listeners will find this appealing. ''Keepin' The Summer Alive'' has it's fans too, despite mediocre reviews. There are about 4 keepers here, in my mind.