Keeping It Living: Traditions of Plant Use and Cultivation on the Northwest Coast of North America

Keeping It Living: Traditions of Plant Use and Cultivation on the Northwest Coast of North America

by Douglas Deur
     
 

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A First Nations chief/scholar sets the tone of these 11 chapters by challenging the trend of "colonizers talking among themselves" about the relationship between humans and the world. Deur (Pacific Northwest Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit, U. of Washington) and Turner (environmental studies and geography, U. of Victoria, Canada) similarly challenge early… See more details below

Overview

A First Nations chief/scholar sets the tone of these 11 chapters by challenging the trend of "colonizers talking among themselves" about the relationship between humans and the world. Deur (Pacific Northwest Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit, U. of Washington) and Turner (environmental studies and geography, U. of Victoria, Canada) similarly challenge early anthropologists' view that indigenous Northwest Coast peoples did not cultivate plants. Contributors re-conceptualize native plant management practices. The book, which grew out of a symposium held in 1997 in Seattle, features b&w photos (some by E.C. Curtis) of native people and plants. Annotation © 2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Editorial Reviews

The Midden: Publication of the Archaeological Society of British Columbia
The significance of plants to the aboriginal cultures of the Northwest Coast of North America often takes a back seat to the iconic salmon. Keeping it Living... brings these essential resources to the forefront.

Western Folklore
To extol the merits of all the essays and case studies in this valuable work is beyond the limits of a brief review, but the volume is a necessary read for anyone interested in food research, ethnobotany, anthropology of food and folk foodways, and cultural representation. The excellent bibliography is a valuable resource for the intellectual history of First Nations peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast.

Canadian Journal of Archaeology
In beginning to correct a profound historical error in Northwest Coast anthropology and sister disciplines, many doors have been opened for future scholarship that re-examines the cultivation practices of coastal First Nations. As the editors acknowledge, this work will keep the knowledge of Northwest Coast Elders and their forebears alive for present and coming generations. Keeping it Living should be essential reading for all people interested in the history of the Northwest Coast.

Pacific Northwest Quarterly
Douglas Deur and Nancy Turner marshal a strong collection of essays to attack the argument that indigenous peoples of the Northwest Coast were purely hunter-gatherer cultures, devoid of agricultural practices because of their good fortune to occupy a resource-laden landscape. Keeping It Living is an important book that will appeal to scholars interested in Northwest Coast peoples and Native American ethnobotany in general.

Salem Statesman Journal
This book is the first comprehensive examination of how the first people to inhabit what is now the Pacific Northwest managed the land on which they lived.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780774812672
Publisher:
University of Washington Press
Publication date:
01/01/2005
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 9.02(h) x 0.95(d)

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