Kenny's Window

Kenny's Window

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by Maurice Sendak
     
 

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Kenny dreams of a fabulous land where he would like to live always, and in his search for it discovers many things about himself and about growing up. 'An unusual, imaginative story . . . in which reality blends with make-believe.' —SLJ.

1956 Children's Spring Book Festival Honor Book (NY Herald Tribune)See more details below

Overview

Kenny dreams of a fabulous land where he would like to live always, and in his search for it discovers many things about himself and about growing up. 'An unusual, imaginative story . . . in which reality blends with make-believe.' —SLJ.

1956 Children's Spring Book Festival Honor Book (NY Herald Tribune)

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
HarperCollins's reissue of Maurice Sendak's oeuvre continues with four more titles. Published in 1956, Kenny's Window follows the adventures of a boy living out his fantasies from the confines of his bedroom. His window provides a magic portal as he strives to answer seven questions posed to him in a dream. The Sign on Rosie's Door (1960) invites readers into the girl's imaginative world, where three knocks reveal her secret: "I'm not Rosie any more," she says. "I'm Alinda, the lovely lady singer." A quartet of neighborhood pals quickly gets in on the act. ( Mar.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
In looking back over Sendak's body of work, it is readily apparent that dreams play a key role in his books. Dreams are the entryway into the psyche and it is there Sendak's fascination lies. In this book, the first that he both wrote and illustrated himself, Sendak spins a story of a young boy who awakes from a dream that he is unable to forget. In it, a four-legged rooster has approached him and promised him anything he wants if he can answer seven questions. Accepting this quest, Kenny begins to try and answer these elusive questions and, in the process, learns some things about himself and growing up. He understands that his wishes must not come to him immediately but that he can wait for them to happen. By today's standards, the text seems overly long and somewhat convoluted. The pen and ink drawings seem bland and unexciting in comparison to his renowned later works, Where the Wild Things Are and In the Night Kitchen. Nevertheless, when viewed as the initial book in his wide body of work, it takes on a new significance. Here we can see the genesis of Sendak' artistic style and his use of the dream metaphor to explore growth. While this book may not attract young readers who are used to shorter more brilliantly illustrated picture books, those of us who admire Sendak's work will want to add this to our collections. 2004 (orig. 1956), HarperCollins, Ages 5 to 8.
—Joan Kindig, Ph.D.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060254940
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
01/01/1956
Pages:
64
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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