Kenobi: Star Wars [NOOK Book]

Overview

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

The Republic has fallen.
Sith Lords rule the galaxy.
Jedi Master Obi-Wan Kenobi has lost everything . . .
Everything but hope.
 
Tatooine—a harsh desert world where ...
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Kenobi: Star Wars

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Overview

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

The Republic has fallen.
Sith Lords rule the galaxy.
Jedi Master Obi-Wan Kenobi has lost everything . . .
Everything but hope.
 
Tatooine—a harsh desert world where farmers toil in the heat of two suns while trying to protect themselves and their loved ones from the marauding Tusken Raiders. A backwater planet on the edge of civilized space. And an unlikely place to find a Jedi Master in hiding, or an orphaned infant boy on whose tiny shoulders rests the future of a galaxy.
 
Known to locals only as “Ben,” the bearded and robed offworlder is an enigmatic stranger who keeps to himself, shares nothing of his past, and goes to great pains to remain an outsider. But as tensions escalate between the farmers and a tribe of Sand People led by a ruthless war chief, Ben finds himself drawn into the fight, endangering the very mission that brought him to Tatooine.
 
Ben—Jedi Master Obi-Wan Kenobi, hero of the Clone Wars, traitor to the Empire, and protector of the galaxy’s last hope—can no more turn his back on evil than he can reject his Jedi training. And when blood is unjustly spilled, innocent lives threatened, and a ruthless opponent unmasked, Ben has no choice but to call on the wisdom of the Jedi—and the formidable power of the Force—in his never-ending fight for justice.

Praise for Kenobi: Star Wars

“Buy this book right now. . . . [This novel] manages to explore the depths of Ben Kenobi but still maintains the aura of mystery around his character.”—Tosche Station

“Addictive, engrossing . . . wildly entertaining . . . There are plenty of twists, turns, and surprises. . . . John Jackson Miller creates a story that reaches new heights.”—Roqoo Depot

“Brilliant . . . This is Star Wars fiction at its absolute best.”—Examiner

“Enthralling . . . almost impossible to put down.”—Eucantina


From the Hardcover edition.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Obi-Wan Kenobi desires anonymity. Living among struggling farmers in the remote desert lands of Tatooine, the heroic Jedi Master now known as "Crazy Old Ben" avoids contact and deflects questions about his past. All those efforts at secrecy are threatened, however, when he is drawn into the fight for survival that the farmers are waging against the intrusive Sand People. An exciting standalone new Stars Wars novel firmly entrenched in the timeline of the films. Worth recommending.

From the Publisher
“Buy this book right now. . . . [This novel] manages to explore the depths of Ben Kenobi but still maintains the aura of mystery around his character.”—Tosche Station

“Addictive, engrossing . . . wildly entertaining . . . There are plenty of twists, turns, and surprises. . . . John Jackson Miller creates a story that reaches new heights.”—Roqoo Depot

“Brilliant . . . This is Star Wars fiction at its absolute best.”—Examiner

“Enthralling . . . almost impossible to put down.”—Eucantina

From the Hardcover edition.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780345549129
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 8/27/2013
  • Series: Star Wars - Legends
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 20,348
  • File size: 7 MB

Meet the Author

Writer and game designer John Jackson Miller is the author of Star Wars: Knight Errant and Star Wars: Lost Tribe of the Sith: The Collected Stories, as well as nine Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic graphic novels. His comics work includes writing for Iron Man, Mass Effect, Bart Simpson, and Indiana Jones. He lives in Wisconsin with his wife, two children, and far too many comic books.


From the Hardcover edition.
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Read an Excerpt

Part One

THE OASIS

Chapter One

Everything casts two shadows.

The suns had determined this at the dawn of creation. Brothers, they were, until the younger sun showed his true face to the tribe. It was a sin. The elder sun attempted to kill his brother, as was only proper.

But he failed.

Burning, bleeding, the younger sun pursued his sibling across the sky. The wily old star fled for the hills and safety, but it was his fate never to rest again. For the younger brother had only exposed his face. The elder had exposed his failure.

And others had seen it—to their everlasting sorrow.

The first Sand People had watched the battle in the sky. The suns, dually covered in shame, turned their wrath on the witnesses. The skybrothers’ gaze tore at the mortals, burning through flesh to reveal their secret selves. The Sand People saw their shadows on the sands of Tatooine, and listened. The younger spirit urged attack. The elder told them to hide. Counsels, from the condemned.

The Sand People were condemned, as well. Always walking with the twin shadows of sacrilege and failure beside them, they would hide their faces. They would fight. They would raid. And they would run.

Most Sand People struck at night, when neither skybrother could whisper to them. A’Yark preferred to hunt at dawn. The voices of the shadows were quieter then—and the settlers who infested the land could see their doom clearly. That was important. The elder sun had failed by not killing his brother. A’Yark would not fail, had never failed, in killing settlers. The elder sun would see the example, and learn . . .

. . . now.

“Tuskens!”

A’Yark charged toward the old farmer who had given the cry. The raider’s metal gaderffii smashed into the human’s naked chin, shattering bone. A’Yark surged forward, knocking the victim to the ground. The settler struggled, coughing as he tried to repeat the cry. “Tuskens!”

Years earlier, other settlers had given that name to the Sand People who obliterated Fort Tusken. The raiders back then had welcomed the name into their tongue; it was proof the walking parasites had nothing the Sand People could not take. But A’Yark couldn’t stand to hear the proud name in the mouths of the appalling creatures—and few were as ugly as the bloody settler now writhing on the sand. The human was ancient. Apart from a bandage from a recent head injury, his whitish hairs and withered flesh were exposed to the sky. It was horrible to see.

A’Yark plunged the hefty gaderffii downward, its metal flanges crushing against the settler’s rib cage. Bones snapped. The weapon’s point went fully through, grinding against the stone surface beneath. The old settler choked his last. The Tusken name again belonged only to the Sand People.

Immediately A’Yark charged toward the low building, a short distance ahead. There was no thought to it. No predator of Tatooine ever stopped to reflect on killing. A Tusken could be no different.

To think too long was to die.

The human nest was a wretched thing, something like a sketto hive: scum molded and shaped into a disgusting half bulb, buried in the sand. This one was formed from that false rock of theirs, the “synstone.” A’Yark had seen it before.

Another shout. A pasty white biped with a bulging cranium appeared in the doorway of the building, brandishing a blaster rifle. A’Yark discarded the gaderffii and lunged, ripping the gun from the startled settler’s hands. A’Yark did not understand how a blaster rifle tore its victim apart, but understanding wasn’t necessary. The thing had a use. The marauder put it to work on the settler, who had no use.

Well, that wasn’t exactly true. The settlers did have a use: to provide more rifles for the Tuskens to take. It might have been a funny thought, if A’Yark ever laughed. But that concept was as alien as the white-skinned corpse now on the floor.

So many strange things had come to live in the desert. And to die.

Behind, two more raiders entered the structure. A’Yark did not know them. The days of going into battle flanked by cousins were long since past. The newcomers began flipping crates in the storage area, spilling contents. More metal things. The settlers were obsessed with them.

The warriors were, too—but it wasn’t time for that. A’Yark barked at them. “N’gaaaiih! N’gaaaiih!”

The youths didn’t listen. They were not A’Yark’s sons. A’Yark had but one son, now, not quite old enough to fight. Nor did these warriors have fathers. It was the way, these days. Mighty tribes had become mere war parties, their ranks constantly evolving as survivors of one group melted into another.

That A’Yark led this raid at all bespoke their misery. No one on the attack had lived half as long as A’Yark had, or seen so much. The best warriors had fallen years before; these youths certainly wouldn’t live to vie for leadership. They were fools, and if A’Yark did not kill them for their foolishness, they would die some other way.

Not this morning, though. A’Yark had chosen the target carefully. This farm was close to the jagged Jundland Wastes, far from the other villages—and it had few of the vile structures by which the residents wrenched water from a sky none could own. The fewer spires—vaporators, the farmers called them—the fewer settlers. Now, it would seem, there were none. Except for the young warriors fumbling, all was quiet.

But A’Yark, who had lived to see forty cycles of the starry sky, was not fooled. A weapon stood beside the doorway leading outside. The old human’s, left by accident? Rifle to silvery mouthpiece, A’Yark sniffed.

No. With one swift motion, A’Yark smashed the weapon against the doorjamb. The rifle had been used to kill a Tusken. The smell of sweat from another day still clung to the stock. It differed from the old human’s scent, and that of the white creature the settlers called a Bith. Someone else was here. But the rifle could not be used now, nor ever again.

A weapon that killed a Tusken had no more power than any other, so far as A’Yark was concerned; such superstitions were for weaker minds. But just as Tuskens prized their banthas, the settlers seemed to prize individual rifles, etching symbols on their stocks. The human that carried this one was more formidable than the old man and the Bith creature, but he would have to resort to something new and unfamiliar next time. If he survived the day.

A’Yark would see that he didn’t.

The war leader reclaimed the gaderffii from the floor and shoved past the looting youths. Footsteps in the sand led around back, where three soulless vaporators hummed and defiled. A small hut for servicing the foul machines sat behind them.

Fitting. A’Yark would make the inhabitants bleed for using the vaporators. Slowly, and so the suns would see. What the settlers had stolen would return to the sand, a drop at a time.

“Ru rah ru rah!” A’Yark called, straining to remember the old words. “We is here in peace.”

No answer. Of course, there would be none—but someone was surely inside and had heard the words. The warrior was proud of remembering them. A human sister had joined A’Yark’s family years ago; the Tuskens often replenished their numbers by kidnapping. The band needed reinforcements now, but would not take anyone here. The settlers’ presence so near the wastes was too great an offense. They would die, and others would see, and the Jundland would be left alone.

The other warriors filed from the house and surrounded the service hut. The Tuskens numbered eight; none could challenge them. Cloth-wrapped hands curled around the shaft of an ancient gaderffii, A’Yark inserted the traang—the curved end of the weapon—into the door handle.

The metal door creaked open. Inside, a quivering trio of humans huddled amid spare parts for the thirst machines. A black-haired woman clutched a swaddled infant, while a brown-haired male held them both. He also held a blaster pistol.

It was the owner of the busted rifle—and A’Yark could tell he was missing the weapon now. Swallowing his fear, the young man looked right into A’Yark’s good eye. “You—go! We’re not afraid.”

“Settlers lie,” A’Yark said, the strange words startling the humans almost as much as they startled the other Tuskens. “Settler lies.”

Eight gaderffii lifted to the sky, their spear-points glinting in the morning light. A’Yark knew some would land true. And the old skybrother above would see again what real bravery was—

“Ayooooo-eh-EH-EHH!”

The sound echoed over the horizon. As one, the war party looked north. The sound came again, louder this time. Its meaning was unmistakable.

The youngest Tusken in the party said it first: krayt dragon!

The warrior-child spun—and stumbled over his own booted feet, landing mouthpiece-first in the sand. The others looked to A’Yark, who turned back toward the hut. The war leader had seen enough human faces to read expressions—but even to a seasoned marauder, the visages were startling.

The farmer and his wife didn’t just appear relieved. They looked defiant.

In the presence of a krayt? The greatest predator Tatooine knew, after the Tuskens? Yes, A’Yark saw. And that wasn’t all. The young mother was clutching something, beside the baby, in her free hand.

A’Yark barked a command to the warriors, but it was too late. With the horrific sound in the air, none would stand. The two looters from earlier nearly trampled the fallen youth as they darted away, trying to remember where they’d set their stolen goods. The others clutched their gaderffii to their chests and fled behind the main hut.

Wrong. Wrong! This wasn’t what A’Yark had taught them. Not at all! But they scattered before they even knew where the dragon was, leaving their leader alone with the settlers. The young farmer kept his blaster pointed at A’Yark, but did not fire. Perhaps he’d calculated the risk, deciding the unfired weapon was more of a deterrent than a shot by a shaky hand.

It didn’t matter. If the settlers had hoped for a distraction, they had gotten one. A’Yark snorted and stepped backward, tan robes swirling.

The warriors were running this way and that. A’Yark yelled, but no one could be heard over the din. There was something unnatural about the sound. But what? No one would pretend to be a krayt dragon! If any could, it would never sound so—

—mechanical?

“AYOOOO-EEEEEEEEEE!”

No mistaking that, A’Yark thought. The moan of the dragon had resolved itself into a head-splitting shrill, far beyond the capacity of any lungs. It was coming loudest from a new source, immediately apparent: a horn attached to one of the silver spires in the middle of the farm. And there were similar sounds, emanating from over the hills to the north and east.

A’Yark stood in the middle of the yard, gaderffii raised aloft. “Prodorra! Prodorra! Prodorra!”

Fake!

The young looters appeared again, running over a crest back toward the farm. A’Yark exhaled through rotten teeth. At least someone had heard, over the racket. Now, at least, maybe they could—

Blasterfire! An orange blaze enveloped one of the runners from behind. The other turned in panic, only to be incinerated as well. A’Yark crouched instinctively, seeking cover behind the accursed vaporator.

“Wa-hooo!” A metallic wave, copper and green, swept over the dune. A’Yark recognized it right away. It was the landspeeder that had haunted them before at the Tall Rock. And now, as then, several settler youths clustered in its open interior, hooting and firing wildly.

A’Yark darted behind a second vaporator, suddenly more confident. There was no dragon, only settlers. The Tuskens could be rallied against them, if they stood true.

But they weren’t standing. One fled toward the nothingness of the east, and A’Yark could see two more landspeeders racing after him. And the clumsy young warrior—who had barely survived the rites of adulthood days before—hid behind the hut, clutching at the sands in cowardice. Only the suns knew where the others had gone.

No good.

The first speeder circled the settlement, its riders showering fire on nothing in particular. And now another hovercraft arrived. Fancier, with sloping curves, the silver vehicle carried two humans in an open compartment protected by a windshield. A grim, hairy-faced human steered the vessel as his older passenger stood brazenly up in his seat.

A’Yark had seen the passenger before, at a greater distance. Clean-shaven, older than most Tuskens ever got—and always wearing the same senseless expression.

The Smiling One.

“More to the south, folks!” the standing human said, macrobinoculars in hand. “Keep after ’em!”

A’Yark didn’t need to know all of the words. The meaning was clear. The missing warriors weren’t nearby, ready to strike. The band, routed, had taken flight.

Seeing the tall human’s landspeeder, the cowering young Tusken from earlier squealed and stood. Leaving his gaderffii on the ground, he bolted.

“Urrak!” A’Yark yelled. Wait!

Too late. Another landspeeder banked—and the hollering riders aboard chopped the fleeing Sand Person down with blast after blast. Not six days a warrior, and dead in seconds.

This was too much. A’Yark rose, weapon in hand, and dashed behind the hut. Away from where the laughing settlers, aware only of their killing, could see. Ragged fabric flew as the warrior tumbled over a dune into a dusty ravine. Another dune followed, and another.

At last, A’Yark fell to the ground, gasping. Three had been lost—maybe more. And the Sand People couldn’t afford to lose anyone.

Worse, they’d lost to settlers using a low trick no Tusken four years earlier would’ve fallen for. The settlers would know now: the mighty Tuskens were not what they once were.

Struggling to stand, A’Yark looked down at the ground. The elder shadow lengthened. Like the older brother sun, the band had struck—and failed.

It was time for the Tuskens to hide. Again.

Chapter Two

Orrin Gault towered over the farm, a lofty witness as some Tuskens ran for their lives—and others ran to their deaths. Clinging to the side of the vaporator tower, he watched the last landspeeder disappear over the horizon.

“Okay, Call Control, that’s got it,” he said into his comlink. “Shut it down.”

He released the comlink button and listened. His ears still rang from the alarm atop the tower, which he had just deactivated by hand. Peering out from beneath the canvas brim of his range hat, he scanned the landscape. One by one, the sirens kilometers away went quiet—and silence returned to the desert.

He looked at the comlink and cracked a grin. Orrin, son—that’s some pull you’ve got there. It was nice to reach a point in life where people did what you said. And on Tatooine, where the people were born cussed and nobody took orders from anyone else, it meant even more.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 47 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(32)

4 Star

(8)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(2)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 47 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2013

    Where DID Obiwan live after he entrusted Luke to Owen and Beru L

    Where DID Obiwan live after he entrusted Luke to Owen and Beru Lars? Surely he didn't sit on a desert outcropping in the glare of the twin suns watching.
    John Jackson Miller presents us with a community of outcasts, describing their everyday life, revealing not only the unavoidable small town politics, but the foibles and failings of the movers and shakers. If that weren't enough, he introduces flesh-and-blood Tuskens never described before. There are enough twists and turns to satisfy anyone who has read other novels about the Star Wars universe, both pre- and post-Battle of Yavin. Well worth the wait.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 29, 2013

    I always loved Westerns when I was growing up. One of my favorit

    I always loved Westerns when I was growing up. One of my favorite authors was Louis L’amour. Then when I was 10, Star Wars came along. The Tatooine setting was ripe for emulating that western tale setting and putting it in the Star Wars Universe. You have Ben Kenobi as the Sergio Leone Man with No Name. You have the stage coach depot/general store setting of the Calwell’s. You have the Cattle/Oil Baron character of Orrin Gault, then you have the threat of the Indians, or in this case, Tusken Raiders.

    Mr. Jackson blends these two settings together into a tale that draws you in. While some may scoff at a Star Wars western, I think it works very well. I’d love to see more stories set in the Tatooine frontier such as this. The characters fit well in the Star Wars universe. We get to see more in depth what Obi-Wan did all those years in seclusion. We also get more of a look into the Tusken Raider culture and see some of their beliefs and superstitions.

    This was a fun story to read and I’d highly recommend it to western or Star Wars fans. I’d say it’s suitable for pre-teen/older teens and adults due to some darker passages.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2013

    great book

    I have read all the books done on Kenobi and feel this is the first book which makes him a human character. All others you could see how his own problems added to Ankin's issues. But this book not only gives him a heart but shows a start for him to understand what went wrong. However it was the whole order which caused the downfall.
    Also it gives you more insite to the tuskan's which I would like to understand more of. Great job and great read.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 2, 2013

    This was one of the best Star Wars novels ever. I had heard real

    This was one of the best Star Wars novels ever. I had heard really good things about it, but I went in kind of hesitant. I don't like Westerns. But the farther I got in the book the more I knew that the good reviews I had heard were spot on. The characters, the events, and the little nods to the rest of the Star Wars EU were all extremely well done. The inclusion of the Tusken Raiders was really a good aspect of the story. Seeing Obi-Wan's shattered spirit in the wake of having to kill his best friend and watching the galaxy he has protected fall under the control of evil was the best part of the book. I would recommend this to anyone who has seen and loved the movies. There is no need to have ever read any other book. If you love Star Wars you will love this book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2013

    Kenobi is one of the best Jedi

    Greetings Star Wars fans,

    I have read stories about his time on Tatooine, but never have I read one with so much detail about his first trail under the twin suns. I also enjoyed reading the parts where he tries to talk with his old master. Fans of Obi Won will love this story and those who don't know him will surely find him their favorite. Read on.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 26, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    A good missing chapter to the Star Wars saga

    I liked this story. It had a familiar setting in the Star Wars universe, but almost all of the characters were new. This is a story about Obi Wan Kenobi's first weeks of his hermitage on Tatooine. It is a good missing chapter between Revenge of the Sith and A New Hope, the original Star Wars film. The only thing I did not appreciate about the book was that there was only one setting. Constantly changing environments is one of the things I have always liked about the Star Wars stories. However, it was still a well told story.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 29, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    About time Ben got his own book. Great read for any Star Wars

    About time Ben got his own book.

    Great read for any Star Wars fan.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2014

    Obi Wan at his best!

    This is a must read for any fan of Star Wars! You follow Obi Wan on his quest to protect the infant son of his former apprentice and friend, Anakin Skywalker, on the rough planet of Tatooine. You go through his personal turmoil of wanting to remain inconspicuous while attempting to protect young Luke from any dangers that may arouse, and from the inner turmoil of not being able to allow others to see him for who he really is, the wise and great Jedi Master, Obi Wan Kenobi. He tries unsuccessfully to attempt to do both, while he cannot ignore the slight injustices being done to some of Tatooine's current residence. Great book, and great insight into Obi Wan/Ben's character. Loved It!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 1, 2014

    Looking at the history of Star wars I am excited to look closely

    Looking at the history of Star wars I am excited to look closely at Kenobi. What happened to Kenobi after returning to Tattooine with the infant Luke, he turns over the child, but how does a heroic figure like Kenobi remain hidden in a wild desert country. He must learn to let others solve their problems and how they relate to the difficulties of life on the edge of the galaxy. This book is reported to be a western version of the Star Wars legacy, but I have found it to be a page turner.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2014

    I have been a fan of Star Wars since i was able to remember watc

    I have been a fan of Star Wars since i was able to remember watching the original 3 back in the 90s. Everything i had was Star Wars, everything i would play with was Star Wars. Even now I'm a far bigger fan with the large collection of stories from several writers collaborating In Geroge Lucas's universe.  I have read a great deal and this book was by far a ingeniously put together, action-packed,  funny where you least expect it.  Then there is the suspense and mystery  that follows through, which i enjoyed far better.  Having the characters always asking who is this Ben Kenobi character???  Kenobi is by far my favorite beside the Thrawn series by Timothy Zahn, for several reasons. For one, i always enjoyed Ben otherwise Obi-wan which ever one you prefer, as a character and as an important role such as being a "fatherly figure" to Luke. In almost every time of Ben showing up in episode 5 and in episode 6 after Yoda passed away those as a child i enjoyed, even today. In this novel you see what Obi-Wan was up too. How he felt, what he saw.  You see a man, scarred after his battle with Anikan on Mustafar and then the compassionate person that we all love before he became the crazy Ben as Uncle Owen describes him, trying to start a new life in the sands of the desert world of Tatooine.  Where every local knows your business and is far to curious for their own good and where treacherous folk conspire against others in their favor. Now this book is full of small adventures, no giant looming Death Star where Vader lands unexpectedly, no giant space battle occurring over a planet, no this book is a small scale occurring in  the same area of Luke's home or close to it.  But believe me, its a great read. the book you need to fill in "the blanks" from the movies.  John Miller creates a stunning array of new characters, a small array of bad villains, and a scenery much what we have seen in the movies. A perfect replica. Your money is going to be well spent. Please read! and enjoy. May the Force be with you my fellow fans. 

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 8, 2014

    Kenobi focuses on a 'smaller' story within the galaxy far, far a

    Kenobi focuses on a 'smaller' story within the galaxy far, far away, despite the fact the primary antagonist is a main film character. There's no over-arcing galactic conflict here, the universe won't fall into chaos if they fail in their mission. Instead what fans get is a more personal journey that delves deeper into the character we all know and love.




    Kenobi was interesting mostly because it showed how Obi-Wan dealt with the guilt he felt over his failure to curb his apprentice's (Anakin) darkest thoughts. It's a very personal journey, and despite being presented for the most part from another person's perspective, it's easy to see Kenobi's anguish and heartache. Even though he has the chance of being genuinely happy and able to cast aside his former life, he refuses to do so. Rather, he looks at his exile as a form of repentance.




    He's continually punishing himself, never once letting himself be as happy as is possible. The conflict in the book stems from his innate heroic nature. His inability to let injustice stand causes a great deal of trouble amongst some of the corrupt water dealers. On top of that a band of Tusken Raiders are on the move seeking to reclaim their lost glory, and there's a lot of innocent people in the way that Kenobi feels compelled to protect.




    While he still acts like a hero and performs amazing feats of heroism for the cause he still fights for, Kenobi's inner turmoil paints him in a different light and one that makes him more relatable. I found myself rooting for him in ways I hadn't before, going beyond his archetype.




    For this reason, I thoroughly enjoyed Kenobi a great deal more than I expected. While I love the big epics some of the book series provide, the smaller story resonated with me in a way the others don't normally. When people think of Star Wars, they think of broad galaxy spanning stories that have great effects the universe over. Really, though, Star Wars is all about the characters and the journey they undertake to get where they are, and embrace their desitny (even if they don't want it).




    John Jackson Miller is the stronger writer and it's evident in this book. Even if it's not considered Canon, it's a story that's well worth picking up and investing yourself into.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2014

    To pj hohman

    Hey this is samuel carson.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2014

    Breastsarebetterthanballs

    I love obi-kanobi and yesi am in lovve with him.



    PEACE OUT- SAMANTHY

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  • Posted July 21, 2014

    Many people have pointed out how parts of the Star Wars saga, es

    Many people have pointed out how parts of the Star Wars saga, especially the scenes on Tatooine, reflect many characteristics of classic westerns. This book takes that idea and runs with it. The character of Obi-Wan Kenobi is introduced as the mysterious stranger who comes into town and helps the townsfolk (in Obi-Wan's case despite his best intentions to stay hidden). Old Ben's character is explored quite a bit but not in the way that some will expect. Rather than delving directly deep into Kenobi's thoughts, the other characters serve as foils who reveal layer after layer of Obi-Wan through their interactions with him. While Obi-Wan is undoubtedly the biggest draw here, the other characters are just as well fleshed out and interesting despite not being in the films. The Tusken Raiders are given a rich mythology that ties into the harsh environment of Tatooine. The novel also introduces one of the more fleshed out and fun female characters in the novels in the character of Annileen Caldwell. She is both strong (without being the caricature "action hero" strong woman) and witty, and her interactions with Obi-Wan reveal his deep despair at the loss of the Jedi Order, his love of creatures, and his adorable aloofness as he follows the Jedi Code while trying to stay hidden from the Empire. This book is extremely well written and a must read for fans of Obi-Wan, westerns, and Star Wars. I've read this book multiple times and given it to friends and family some of whom are not big Star Wars fans. It is good enough that you will enjoy it even if Star Wars isn't your thing. Enjoy!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2014

    ROOM #2

    Post

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2014

    <_>

    <_>

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2014

    mina.bulaya@gmail.com

    It wasn't horrible, but it wasn't amazing either. Add me too. :)
    And all you peeps wondering if I am a girl.....YES I AM. And yes I read Star Wars. There is NOTHING wrong with that! NOTHING!

    PEACE OUT~Mina

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2014

    Star wars rp

    Main camp




    - Chase Skywalker

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2014

    Geat book

    Good suprising storyline

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2014

    Average.

    Little character development. Predictable plot.

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