Kentucky, 1861: Loyalty, State, and Nation

Kentucky, 1861: Loyalty, State, and Nation

Kentucky, 1861: Loyalty, State, and Nation

Kentucky, 1861: Loyalty, State, and Nation

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Overview

Kentucky, 1861 pulls students into the secession crisis following Lincoln's 1860 election. During a special session of the Kentucky legislature, set against the looming threat of violence, students grapple with questions about the future of slavery and the constitutionality of secession.


Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781469672397
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date: 07/01/2022
Series: Reacting to the PastT
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: eBook
Pages: 192
Sales rank: 140,227
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Nicolas W. Proctor is professor of history at Simpson College. Margaret Storey is professor of history and associate dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences at DePaul University.

Table of Contents

1 Introduction

Brief Overview of the Game 3

Prologue 3

What Is Reacting to the Past? 10

How to Play a Reacting Game 10

Game Setup 10

Game Play 10

Game Requirements 12

Skill Development 12

2 Historical Background

Chronology 15

Kentucky and the Crisis of Secession 16

States' Rights 16

The Early Republic 19

Abolitionism 21

The Rise of Sectionalism 27

The Future of Slavery 37

Disunion Debated 41

The Election of 1860 45

3 The Game

Major Issues for Debate 51

Rules and Procedures 52

Objectives and Victory Conditions 52

Proceedings of the Legislature 54

Militias 58

Militia Proliferation 59

Assuming Command 59

Militia Strength 59

Militia Actions 60

Basic Outline of the Game 64

Setup Session 1 Historical Background 64

Setup Session 2 The Lincoln Problem 65

Setup Session 3 Introduction to the Game 66

First Legislative Session: The Future of Slavery 67

Subsequent Legislative Sessions 68

Debriefing and Postmortem 68

Assignments 68

Speeches 68

Newspapers 69

Postmortem Assessment 70

Counterfactuals 71

4 Roles and Factions

The Governor 73

The Inspector General 74

Members of the Legislature 74

5 Core Texts

Note on the Texts 81

"The Second Reply to Hayne," January 1830 Daniel Webster 81

A Disquisition on Government, 1849 John C. Calhoun 86

"Seventh of March Speech," March 7, 1850 Daniel Webster 101

"On the Compromise Bills," July 22, 1850 Henry Clay 109

"The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro," July 5, 1852 Frederick Douglass 112

"Cotton Is King," March 4, 1858 James Henry Hammond 117

"A House Divided,' June 16, 1858 Abraham Lincoln 123

"Freeport Debate," August 27, 1858 Abraham Lincoln Stephen Douglas 127

"An Irrepressible Conflict," October 25, 1858 William Henry Seward 135

Manumission Act of 1860, March 3, 1860 143

Militia Act of 1860, March 5, 1860 145

"Speech of Protest in the Charleston Convention," April 28, 1860 William Lowndes Yancey 150

Amendments Proposed in Congress, December 18, 1860 John J. Crittenden 155

"Letter to Governor Beriah Magoffin." December 27, 1860 Stephen F. Hale 159

"A Southern Christian View of Slavery," December 4, 1861 James Henley Thornwell 168

Selected Bibliography 175

Notes 177

Acknowledgments 183

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