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Kettles Get New Clothes
     

Kettles Get New Clothes

by Dayle Ann Dodds, Jill McElmurry (Illustrator)
 
The hapless Kettles find themselves in a silly spoof of the world of fashion foibles—with the help of sprightly illustrations and a bouncy, repetitive text that begs to be read aloud.

"PAISLEY," said Monsieur Pip, "is perky and spry. I love it, don’t you? Just give it a try."

Once a year the Kettles get new clothes, plain and

Overview

The hapless Kettles find themselves in a silly spoof of the world of fashion foibles—with the help of sprightly illustrations and a bouncy, repetitive text that begs to be read aloud.

"PAISLEY," said Monsieur Pip, "is perky and spry. I love it, don’t you? Just give it a try."

Once a year the Kettles get new clothes, plain and simple as you please.
But this year their favorite shop has been taken over by Monsieur Pip’s fancy boutique! Soon they’re on a wild ride through the world of high fashion, in crazy patterns and every color of the rainbow. Will the conservative Kettles ever find the clothes they need? Mais oui! For
Monsieur Pip’s customers are always happy - G-U-A-R-A-N-T-E-E-D!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
On their annual trip to the big city, the Kettles, a family of floppy-eared dogs, know exactly what they want: "Brand-new clothes, plain and simple as you please." But their favorite store is now in the hands of Monsieur Pip, a French-accented Scottie who promises: "My customers are always happy./ G-U-A-R-A-N-T-E-E-D." The ensuing give-and-take between the flashy salesman and the bumpkin Kettles lies at the heart of Dodds's (Sing Sophie!) amusing story. In four scenes, the Kettles try on Monsieur Pip's outlandish clothes, emerging in a parade of patterns. Monsieur Pip tries to convince them to buy ("Paisley... is perky and spry. I love it, don't you? Just give it a try"), but the Kettles aren't sold ("Too perky," said Father./ "Too spry" said Mother./ "Don't love it," said Sister./ "Nor I!" said Brother). McElmurry supports Dodds's playful mimicry with vivid, merry illustrations drawn against textured backgrounds; in the paisley costume change, for instance, the Kettles look like '60s hipsters. The story ends with a tail-wagging twist: the older Kettles may prefer their clothes plain and simple, but Baby Kettle digs stripes and plaids (ensemble!). This engaging book will earn giggles from kids who love a good joke, G-U-A-R-A-N-T-E-E-D. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-When the Kettles go to their favorite clothing store, they are surprised to find a much fancier shop, with the elegant Monsieur Pip as the new proprietor. He has them trying on paisley, stripes, checks, and dots in a wild fashion show of patterns and colors. When they are all at wit's end except Baby, who likes everything, the owner finally shows them what they want-clothes that are "plain and simple." This endearing story features sophisticated but hilarious gouache illustrations and a rhyming story that leaves Monsieur Pip's customers, as well as readers, satisfied and happy, "G-U-A-R-A-N-T-E-E-D!"-Shelley B. Sutherland, Niles Public Library District, IL
Kirkus Reviews
The Kettles are surprised to find that their old clothing store has been replaced by Monsieur Pip's haute couture boutique. This family of dogs only wants some plain and functional clothing, but they soon find themselves dressed in a variety of colors and styles. The proprietor claims that his customers are always happy-guaranteed. Sporting paisley bellbottoms and gold chains, the Kettles decide that's too perky and too spry. Hip stripes are too forceful and strong. Bold checks are too cheery and too snappy. Nearing the end of his rope, Monsieur Pip dresses the Kettles in dots, but they are too playful and too fun. Only Baby Kettle is happy about the exciting new clothing, smiling through all the wardrobe changes. Finally the Kettles find some plain clothing that fits the bill and everyone is relieved until Baby begins to cry. Taking his cue, Monsieur Pip takes Baby back into the dressing room for one final change of clothes. To everyone's delight, she emerges in an exciting mix of paisley, stripes, checks, and dots, giving the littlest Kettle a look all her own. The colorful gouache illustrations are an amusing commentary on the wild world of high fashion, and young readers will delight in the whimsical details of the dog's shopping experience. The repetitive text makes this a perfect read-aloud selection. Fun? Mais oui! "G-U-A-R-A-N-T-E-E-D!" (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763610913
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
09/28/2002
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.88(w) x 9.52(h) x 0.36(d)
Lexile:
AD460L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Dayle Ann Dodds is the author of several books for children, including SING SOPHIE!, THE GREAT DIVIDE, and PET WASH. Of THE KETTLES GET NEW CLOTHES, she says, "When I was a girl, we spent our summers in the mountains. There were no stores nearby, so as fall approached, we pored over clothes catalogs and the prints, colors, and styles we wanted. Returning home for school, we’d find a big box filled with the clothes we had ordered. Some fit, some didn’t, but it was always fun, G-U-A-R-A-N-T-E-E-D!"

Jill McElmurry has also illustrated Lilian Moore’s poetry collection for young readers, I'M SMALLl. She says about this story, "I’d heard about the Kettles and their need for new clothes. Imagine my surprise when I was introduced to them and realized that they were dogs. I love dogs! I love new clothes! I knew then that this was the story for me."

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