The Key to the Golden Firebird [NOOK Book]

Overview

The funny thing about stop signs is that they're also start signs.

Mayzie is the brainy middle sister, Brooks is the beautiful but conflicted oldest, and Palmer's the quirky baby of the family. In spite of their differences, the Gold sisters have always been close.

When their father dies, everything begins to fall apart. Level–headed May is left to fend for herself (and somehow learn to drive), while her two sisters struggle with their own ...

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The Key to the Golden Firebird

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Overview

The funny thing about stop signs is that they're also start signs.

Mayzie is the brainy middle sister, Brooks is the beautiful but conflicted oldest, and Palmer's the quirky baby of the family. In spite of their differences, the Gold sisters have always been close.

When their father dies, everything begins to fall apart. Level–headed May is left to fend for herself (and somehow learn to drive), while her two sisters struggle with their own demons. But the girls learn that while there are a lot of rules for the road, there are no rules when it comes to the heart. Together, they discover the key to moving on – and it's the key to their father's Pontiac Firebird.

This critically acclaimed, totally compelling book is perfect for readers looking for both a fun ride and a life–changing journey from one of today's best new YA writers. And it fits perfectly in the glove compartment.

As three teenaged sisters struggle to cope with their father's sudden death, they find they must reexamine friendships, lifelong dreams, and their relationships with each other and their father.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Three sisters named for baseball players by their beloved father begin to unravel after his death. Each responds in a different but credible way, and begins to heal. Ages 12-up. (July) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
VOYA
The sudden, shocking death of their father has turned the world of three teenage sisters upside-down. A year following Mike Gold's collapse as he stepped out of his beloved 1967 Pontiac Firebird convertible, Brooks, May, and Palmer are beginning to unravel. Seventeen-year-old Brooks, an all-state shortstop, abruptly quits the varsity softball team, turning to parties and alcohol. Fourteen-year-old Palmer experiences panic attacks, insomnia, and breathing difficulties. May, the serious, overly responsible middle daughter, is a nervous wreck as she tries to maintain her grades while looking after both sisters during their weary mother's evening shifts at the hospital. May's new feelings about her lifetime friend and neighbor, Pete, cause her more anxiety than pleasure. Through it all, the powerful, silent Firebird sits unused in the garage, its key still hanging in the kitchen. The girls feel that, like the key to the Firebird, there must be a key that will allow them to get their lives back on track. Finally, the three sisters find a spectacular way of using the key to the Firebird to honor their father's memory and bring real closure to their loss. All the characters in this fine debut novel are vivid and distinctive. The portrayal of intense relationships among a trio of under-parented sisters recalls Julie Johnston's In Spite of Killer Bees (Tundra, 2001/VOYA December 2001). The novel's focus upon the introverted, hypersensitive middle daughter, May, will remind some readers of the sister dynamics in Patrice Kindl's Woman in the Wall (Houghton Mifflin, 1997/VOYA August 1997). VOYA Codes 4Q 3P J S (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Will appeal with pushing; JuniorHigh, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2004, HarperCollins, 304p., and PLB Ages 12 to 18.
—Walter Hogan
KLIATT
AGERANGE: Ages 12 to 18.

To quote the review of the hardcover in KLIATT, May 2004: Three teenage sisters reel after the sudden death of their beloved father, with their equally devastated mother barely coping. Their father loved baseball and named his daughters after famous players: Brooks, Mayzie (known as May, named after Willie Mays), and Palmer. Their summers with their father had been taken up by their own ball games in summer leagues and frequent trips to watch the Orioles play in Camden Yards, so the summer after his death is especially painful. Brooks, a natural athlete, quits the team and starts a self-destructive path with dubious friends. The youngest sister, Palmer, is only 13; she loses herself in endless TV and sleeplessness. May learns to drive a car with the help of longtime family friend Peter, and their relationship is a major part of the story. Their mother worries about money and doesn’t have time or energy to take care of her girls. The climax of the story is when May gets the keys to her father’s car, a Firebird, and the three girls take his ashes from Phillie to Baltimore, on a mission to scatter their father’s remains on the pitcher’s mound at Camden Yards. The story is told in the third person, more and more unusual in YA novels, but the despair of May and her sisters is clear, even if not related in the confessional first-person narrative. The dynamics of the relationships among the sisters, and with Peter and their other friends, are believable and honest, ringing absolutely true. Any YA reader will understand what these girls are enduring in their grief. (An ALA Best Book for YAs.) Reviewer: Claire Rosser
March 2008 (Vol. 42, No.2)

Children's Literature - Jennifer Waldrop
The Key to the Golden Firebird is reminiscent of Sarah Dessen's The Truth About Forever, without the quirky charm. May, her two sisters Brooks and Palmer, and her mother are all divided by their suffering in the aftermath of her father's death. Their various addictions—drugs, sports, and school work—keep them functioning, but it is not until a year has passed that they begin the painful process of healing. The Firebird is the car their father drove that has been retired to the garage. Brooks is the first one to break the unspoken agreement not to drive the car. After that, it is slowly reintegrated into their lives and one by one, the girls find various uses for the car that become the catalyst for their recovery and bring them closer together. The book lacks the whimsical charm of 13 Little Blue Envelopes but it is still a touching and meaningful read. Reviewer: Jennifer Waldrop
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up-Poignant and laced with wry humor, this novel follows the Gold sisters as they cope with their father's sudden death from a heart attack. While their mother works overtime to keep them afloat financially, the three teens cope in their own way-often with disastrous results. The focus is on May, the studious, steady middle sister, who tries to hold the family together even as she is going to pieces on the inside. She is falling for Pete, a neighbor she has grown up with, but is afraid to admit it even to herself, so she watches in agony as he dates her coworker at a coffee shop. Palmer, the youngest, begins to have panic attacks. Brooks, the oldest, quits the softball team, gets drunk on a regular basis, and makes plans to have sex with her not-quite-boyfriend. Set in a suburb of Philadelphia, the novel revolves around baseball and the father's Pontiac Firebird, which serves as a haven for one of the girls, a means to rebel for another, and an important part of the healing process for all three. This is a wonderfully moving and entertaining novel full of authentic characters and emotions.-Miranda Doyle, San Francisco Public Library Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
This affecting story, of three teenaged sisters coping with their father's sudden death, centers around May, the middle, brainy one. Older sister Brooks and younger sister Palmer are both outstanding softball players who had been chummy with their baseball-loving Dad, but May feels she had been left out of his affections. She also feels left out of any chance or romance, especially with Pete, the boy who has been like an irritating brother to her. As Brooks falls in with the wrong crowd while Palmer keeps her own intense grief to herself, May struggles with work and study, with learning to drive, and with her long-suppressed romance with Pete. Johnson writes with a literate, sophisticated style, and her expert character development taps into the real emotions of three fully realized adolescents. The story's realism lends credibility to the emotional struggles of a courageous family that should touch many young readers. (Fiction. YA)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061973949
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/6/2009
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 588,533
  • Age range: 13 - 17 Years
  • File size: 625 KB

Meet the Author

Maureen Johnson is a New York Times bestselling author whose novels include The Name of the Star, Suite Scarlett, Scarlett Fever, Girl At Sea, The Key To The Golden Firebird, and 13 Little Blue Envelopes. She lives in New York City, but travels to the UK regularly to soak up the drizzle and watch English TV.

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Read an Excerpt

The Key to the Golden Firebird


By Johnson, Maureen

HarperCollins Publishers

ISBN: 0060541393

Firebird, golden
(largous automobilus yellowish)

  1. A car manufactured by Pontiac. In this particular case, a car painted a color called Signet Gold and built in Lordstown, Ohio, in 1967. Almost sixteen feet long, with extremely poor gas mileage and no modern amenities. Has a cream-colored interior and a black convertible top and belches noxious clouds of instant-cancer fumes whenever started. Attracts an unreasonable amount of attention from car buffs (for its collectability) and others (because it's brightly colored, noisy, and as big as a battleship).
  2. A mythical creature prominently featured in Russian folktales. Possesses magical powers. Wherever the Firebird goes, princes, princesses, kings, and mad wizards are sure to follow.
  3. Presumably, any golden bird that's on fire.


before


"Chome on," Palmer said, her words dulled from numb-tongue syndrome caused by the Icee she was slurping. "You haff to admit it wash funny."

May, who was sweating profusely and peering longingly through the bottom of the screened window at a swimming pool, turned and stared at her little sister. "No, I don't," she said.

"It wash . . . ambhishious."

"Ambitious?" May repeated. "Looks like you got a new vocabulary word." "It wash."

"They didn't play 'Wind Beneath My Wings' for you," May said. "Just be quiet for a minute, okay? I'm trying to listen."

She turned back to the window.

"I shtill can't believf the Oriole pickhed you up," Palmer went on, grinning at the thought. The Icee had turned her teeth a faint blue, which looked even creepier against her braces. It was as if the disguise was being dropped and thirteen-year-old Palmer was revealing herself to be a monster with blue metal teeth.

May wasn't smiling, because the memory wasn't funny to her. She was here for a reason. She was getting revenge—revenge that had been a long time coming. Peter Camp was going down.

Pete was the son of her father's best friend and had been eleven months old when May was born. There were pictures of him lurking above her as she was swaddled in baby blankets, unable to move. He looked surprisingly the same—brown curly hair, body covered in head-to-toe freckles, a slightly goofy, yet predatory expression as he reached for her stuffed duck.

Right from the beginning, May had been the unwilling straight man in Pete's ever-evolving comedy routine. There was the lick-and-replace sandwich gag from kindergarten. The yo-yo spit trick at the bus stop in third grade. The terrifying "lawn sprinkler" (don't ask) from fifth grade. The dribble holes in her milk, the lab worms in her lunch, the bike-by Supersoaker attacks . . . There was nothing too low, too stupid, too disgusting for him to try. Then Pete had moved on to Grant High, and they'd been separated. The next year May had ended up going to a different high school—to Girls' Academy, in downtown Philadelphia. Aside from the occasional whoopie cushion at holiday gatherings, she believed the menace had ended.

Until last weekend, when the Golds and the Camps had taken their annual trip to Camden Yards.

The Camden Yards trip was one of the major events of the year. Even May, who didn't like baseball, was able to work up some enthusiasm for it—if only because her father and sisters were practically humming with excitement. Also, May's dad always saw to it that she was entertained in one way or another. He'd let her choose some of the music in the car. (Along with the obligatory Bruce Springsteen. Her dad had to blast "Out in the Street" and "Thunder Road" as he tore down I-95 in the Firebird. Had to. As if the earth would explode if he didn't—or worse yet, it might rain and the game would be a washout.) He'd glance at her through the rearview mirror and make his "big tooth" face, pulling his lips back in a horselike grimace that always made her laugh. As a reward for sitting through the game, her dad would slip her some cash (he had developed a very slick move, which even Palmer couldn't detect) so that she could buy herself an extra snack from the concessions. So May had come to peace with the event.

On this last trip she had been biding her time during the seventh-inning stretch, staring absently into the depths of her cup of lemonade. The next thing she knew, a pair of huge and fuzzy black wings embraced her. Suddenly she was being lifted out of her seat by someone in a black bird costume and was on her way down to the field. Once there, she was immediately set upon by five members of the Baltimore Orioles, all of whom shook her hand. One gave her a signed ball. The crowd began to cheer her. Then, just when things couldn't get any weirder, she looked up and saw her own face—big as a building—stretched across the Jumbotron.

Underneath it was the caption May Gold, formerly blind fan.

She didn't even have time to react before she was escorted back to her seat. It had taken over an hour to get an explanation because that was how long it had taken for Peter Camp to stop laughing. He revealed at last that he had told one of the public relations staff that May had been born blind, had just been cured by surgery, and was fulfilling her lifelong dream of seeing a live baseball game. It was an incredibly weird story—so weird that they'd actually believed him.

The audacity of the stunt had kept Pete from getting into any trouble; in fact, the Gold-Camp contingent now ranked Pete among mankind's greatest thinkers. May's father had immediately claimed the baseball and held it carefully with both hands for the remainder of the game, as though it were his very own egg that he was protecting until it hatched.

Continues...

Excerpted from The Key to the Golden Firebird by Johnson, Maureen Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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First Chapter

The Key to the Golden Firebird

Firebird, golden
(largous automobilus yellowish)

  1. A car manufactured by Pontiac. In this particular case, a car painted a color called Signet Gold and built in Lordstown, Ohio, in 1967. Almost sixteen feet long, with extremely poor gas mileage and no modern amenities. Has a cream-colored interior and a black convertible top and belches noxious clouds of instant-cancer fumes whenever started. Attracts an unreasonable amount of attention from car buffs (for its collectability) and others (because it's brightly colored, noisy, and as big as a battleship).
  2. A mythical creature prominently featured in Russian folktales. Possesses magical powers. Wherever the Firebird goes, princes, princesses, kings, and mad wizards are sure to follow.
  3. Presumably, any golden bird that's on fire.


before


"Chome on," Palmer said, her words dulled from numb-tongue syndrome caused by the Icee she was slurping. "You haff to admit it wash funny."

May, who was sweating profusely and peering longingly through the bottom of the screened window at a swimming pool, turned and stared at her little sister. "No, I don't," she said.

"It wash . . . ambhishious."

"Ambitious?" May repeated. "Looks like you got a new vocabulary word." "It wash."

"They didn't play 'Wind Beneath My Wings' for you," May said. "Just be quiet for a minute, okay? I'm trying to listen."

She turned back to the window.

"I shtill can't believf the Oriole pickhed you up," Palmer went on, grinning at the thought. The Icee had turned her teeth a faint blue, which looked even creepier against her braces. It was as if the disguise was being dropped and thirteen-year-old Palmer was revealing herself to be a monster with blue metal teeth.

May wasn't smiling, because the memory wasn't funny to her. She was here for a reason. She was getting revenge—revenge that had been a long time coming. Peter Camp was going down.

Pete was the son of her father's best friend and had been eleven months old when May was born. There were pictures of him lurking above her as she was swaddled in baby blankets, unable to move. He looked surprisingly the same—brown curly hair, body covered in head-to-toe freckles, a slightly goofy, yet predatory expression as he reached for her stuffed duck.

Right from the beginning, May had been the unwilling straight man in Pete's ever-evolving comedy routine. There was the lick-and-replace sandwich gag from kindergarten. The yo-yo spit trick at the bus stop in third grade. The terrifying "lawn sprinkler" (don't ask) from fifth grade. The dribble holes in her milk, the lab worms in her lunch, the bike-by Supersoaker attacks . . . There was nothing too low, too stupid, too disgusting for him to try. Then Pete had moved on to Grant High, and they'd been separated. The next year May had ended up going to a different high school—to Girls' Academy, in downtown Philadelphia. Aside from the occasional whoopie cushion at holiday gatherings, she believed the menace had ended.

Until last weekend, when the Golds and the Camps had taken their annual trip to Camden Yards.

The Camden Yards trip was one of the major events of the year. Even May, who didn't like baseball, was able to work up some enthusiasm for it—if only because her father and sisters were practically humming with excitement. Also, May's dad always saw to it that she was entertained in one way or another. He'd let her choose some of the music in the car. (Along with the obligatory Bruce Springsteen. Her dad had to blast "Out in the Street" and "Thunder Road" as he tore down I-95 in the Firebird. Had to. As if the earth would explode if he didn't—or worse yet, it might rain and the game would be a washout.) He'd glance at her through the rearview mirror and make his "big tooth" face, pulling his lips back in a horselike grimace that always made her laugh. As a reward for sitting through the game, her dad would slip her some cash (he had developed a very slick move, which even Palmer couldn't detect) so that she could buy herself an extra snack from the concessions. So May had come to peace with the event.

On this last trip she had been biding her time during the seventh-inning stretch, staring absently into the depths of her cup of lemonade. The next thing she knew, a pair of huge and fuzzy black wings embraced her. Suddenly she was being lifted out of her seat by someone in a black bird costume and was on her way down to the field. Once there, she was immediately set upon by five members of the Baltimore Orioles, all of whom shook her hand. One gave her a signed ball. The crowd began to cheer her. Then, just when things couldn't get any weirder, she looked up and saw her own face—big as a building—stretched across the Jumbotron.

Underneath it was the caption May Gold, formerly blind fan.

She didn't even have time to react before she was escorted back to her seat. It had taken over an hour to get an explanation because that was how long it had taken for Peter Camp to stop laughing. He revealed at last that he had told one of the public relations staff that May had been born blind, had just been cured by surgery, and was fulfilling her lifelong dream of seeing a live baseball game. It was an incredibly weird story—so weird that they'd actually believed him.

The audacity of the stunt had kept Pete from getting into any trouble; in fact, the Gold-Camp contingent now ranked Pete among mankind's greatest thinkers. May's father had immediately claimed the baseball and held it carefully with both hands for the remainder of the game, as though it were his very own egg that he was protecting until it hatched.

The Key to the Golden Firebird. Copyright © by Maureen Johnson. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 52 )
Rating Distribution

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(31)

4 Star

(8)

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(11)

2 Star

(1)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 52 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2011

    H

    Hgthjgfhjufdgh

    2 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 27, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    from missprint.wordpress.com

    I'm embarrassed to say that this book has been on my to read list for almost as long as it has been published. But then I started following the author's blog and her twitters and they were so amazing that the idea of still not reading any of her books became unbearable, especially since the author is so awesome that I want to write to her and ask if we can be friends. So, last week I put every YA book I could think of that I had been dying to read on hold. The Key to the Golden Firebird (2004) by Maureen Johnson was at the top of the pile.

    May doesn't always understand her older and younger sisters, she isn't even sure she looks like them. But even though May lacks their athleticism or general interest in sports, the three Gold sisters were family; they always had each others' backs.

    That was before their father's death shattered their previously strong family unit.

    Brooks, the eldest, is so busy drowning her sorrows that everything else begins to fall to the wayside. Things get even worse as she begins to run with the wrong crowd and her drinking escalates.

    Palmer, the youngest of the Gold sisters, is trying to understand all of the changes at home while being the youngest member of her school softball team. But as the pressure and anxiety build, Palmer begins to wonder if she'll ever be able to cope with anything ever again.

    That leaves May, the smart, responsible middle sister. While her mother is working overtime and her sisters struggle through their own crises, May is left to handle the more quotidian tasks of making dinner and otherwise ensuring the continued (albeit relative) stability of their household. Adrift among a family in crisis, May is putting on a brave face as she balances work, school, and the even more daunting task of learning to drive. When May's lifelong friend, and sometime nemesis, offers to teach her to drive things get even more complicated. Unlike driving, there are no instructions for grieving . . . or falling for the last person you ever thought you would.

    As the girls drift apart each gravitates, in their own way, to their father's 1967 Pontiac Firebird and also the site of his death. The Golden Firebird might be a horrible reminder of everything the Golds lost, but it might also be the key to finally moving on.

    This book is written in the third person. Segments are told from each sister's perspective with the bulk of the story going to May since it is, arguably, her book. Initially the structure was surprising, but it makes sense since a significant amount of this novel is about how the Gold sisters relate to each other--seeing events from each of their perspectives both complicates and clarifies these relationships. The novel artfully traces the healing process of each sister, and the family at large. Although some things remain up in the air the story ends, as it should, with a sense that these characters will make it through.

    Johnson became one of my favorite writers before I ever opened one of her books, but The Key to the Golden Firebird showed that my admiration was well-founded. The story here is incredibly compelling and the characters come alive on the page.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2012

    Amazing

    I really liked this book. I was caught in it and could not put it down. May is the main character. She has an older sister and a younger sister. The book is about them and there mom dealing with loosing there father. The gold sisters fall apart. To answer kristin's question, there is romance between may and the fathers friends son.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2011

    ?????

    If you have read this book, can you tell me if there is ant romance in it? I only read teen romance/teen realistic fiction books. Please let me know!!!!!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 19, 2011

    in the middle

    this book was very easy to get into. i thought it was great. may was definitely someone i relate to, besides us both having 2 sisters. the bad news is that i didnt like one certain characters. they have such issues and its not exactly explained why! (im sure you'll get what i mean) overall i think it was good but the ending ruined it for me. it felt like the story was cut off. i think it needed more to it. it made me throw the freakin book across my living room.

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  • Posted March 19, 2011

    wow

    it was really powerful but really sad i sometimes had to put it down 2 grab the kleenex! great story line

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  • Posted February 27, 2011

    jar of dirt award worthy.

    maureen writes awesome books. its an epic win. she deserves a jar of dirt. cuz its a win.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2011

    hello

    hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Wonderful!!

    This book was amazing from beginning to end!It is a great TEEN book.I recommend it highly!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2009

    One of my favorites!!!!

    The author Maureen Johson sure knows how to write. this book talks about the challenges the 3 sisters go through after losing the father to a heartattack. They all end up having their own set of problems and drifting apart but then they go on a family vacations that ends up drawing them close to each other. There is also a little romance. One of the best!!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2008

    Loved the Ending

    The most exciting part of the story was the very beginning and the very end. I wish the whole book had been more like those parts. But I did like the book, and would recommend it for more of a rainy-day read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2008

    The Gold Sisters

    Mayzie 'May' Gold is struggling. Her father has recently died from a heart attack, her eldest sister Brooks is going deeper into her drinking problem, her youngest sister Palmer is always in the wrong place at the wrong time and has been acting strangly lately, their mom has been working like crazy to make ends meet, and May still has to pass her driving test. And who shall swoop in to save the day? Why the semi-cute son of her late father's friend will. Some what predictable, but it all works out after a few twists and turns here and there. over-all: Very nice.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2008

    SUCH AN INTENSE BOOK 33

    This was a great great book. COntains all emotions to happy to sad to funny. A must read!! RECCOMENDED

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2008

    one of the greatest books ever

    this book is just completly amazing and everything about it is great! you have to read this book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2007

    The Golden Girls

    Mayzie Gold is a sixteen year old girl without a father. Her mother is a workaholic, and never stops working, and she never pays any attention to her kids. Her oldest sibling, Brooks, is blonde and athletic. Mayzieâ¿¿s younger sister is basically a fourteen year old Brooks. Mayzie on the other hand is not athletic, but very, very smart. When Brooks gets a DUI major changes happen. Brooksâ¿¿s driverâ¿¿s license gets taken away, while mayzie is still trying to get one after failing several times. While everyone is dealing with their fatherâ¿¿s death, brooks takes up partying and getting drunk most nights, while palmer is quiet and never sleeps. Mayzie is silently grieving, while her mother works away dealing with the loss and ignores her depressed kids. Read The Key to the Golden Firebird to learn the true meaning of the golden girls I really enjoyed this book because it was one of those books you canâ¿¿t put it down. I can somewhat relate to the book because my siblings are really athletic and Iâ¿¿m not. Lots of others are probably like that to. Dealing with a loss of a parent would be so sad, and I would be really depressed, so the book helps me to understand what someone goes through. If you have lost a parent I would recommend you read this, because It could help you sort out your feelings. Maureen Johnson is a very good author. She is good with detail and words thing so itâ¿¿s easy to understand. I would recomend this book to any female in grades seven through ten

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2006

    A Good Read

    The keys to the golden firebird has a hilarious beginning and you get to see how Pete and Mayzie change. I loved it but she lost my attention in the middle of the book. The ending was satifactory.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2006

    okay...

    i've read her book 'the bermudez triangle' which is better than this one. i havent read devilish yet but i think this is her 3rd best book. i dont really like the characters but the story line is good. i just dont like the characters.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2006

    You have to read it, no joke.

    This book was really really good. It usually takes me awhile to start liking a book but this one just totally caught me. I couldn't put it down. You can really realte to all the characters and the relationship between all of them is totally perfect. A must read novel!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2006

    AMAZING!!!!!!!

    This book was so good. It'd be dead silent and i was reading, and i just start craking up. it was fun to read, funny, great. It seemed so real to me. I could totally relate to the characters. It definitely captures the realness of drugs, acohol, sex, betrayal, and friends. Pretty much caught all aspects of a teenagers life nowadays. Two thumbs way up, and 5 stars. I loved it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2006

    I feel like these three sisters are my real life friends!

    I've already read the Bermudez Triangle (also by Maureen Johnson) and that's what inspired me to buy this book. Johnson's writing is authentic and life-like. I feel all three of the fictional intertwining lives of the Gold sisters could be reality. I could relate to almost all the situations May, Brooks and Palmer went through. If that wasn't good enough, it was humorous too.

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