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Key To The Prison
     

Key To The Prison

5.0 1
by Louise Vernon, Allan Eitzen (Illustrator)
 

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This story takes place in Ulverston, England, about 300 years ago. George Fox, an English religious leader and the founder of the Society of Friends, also called Quakers, lived during that time. Tommy Stafford and his sister, Celia, witness the violence and persecution brought on by the words and ways of Fox. His courage, calmness, and power with God influenced the

Overview

This story takes place in Ulverston, England, about 300 years ago. George Fox, an English religious leader and the founder of the Society of Friends, also called Quakers, lived during that time. Tommy Stafford and his sister, Celia, witness the violence and persecution brought on by the words and ways of Fox. His courage, calmness, and power with God influenced the whole family. For 9-to-14-year-olds. 144 Pages.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
This story, which could very loosely be classified as historical fiction, follows the lives of the Stafford family, who break with the Church of England and join the Quakers, a group headed by George Fox. The Stafford children face persecution from the community when their father, a minister, leaves the church to join Fox. The government confiscates the family's property, and they are forced to work for a wealthy family to survive. After alerting authorities about stolen property, the family is thrown into prison with Fox. They later flee with Fox and follow him to the New World to escape religious persecution. The problem with this book, besides the fact that it is poorly written and mind-numbingly boring, is that it takes historical figures like Fox and portrays acts that they very well may not have done. It is worthwhile to recognize the plight of those who rebelled against the Church of England in search of religious freedom, but in this story Vernon blends historical information with fictional scenes in which Fox successfully heals the crippled through faith healing and becomes a Christ-like figure. Characters are barely developed, and the plot is predictable and anticlimactic. The story ends with the Quakers landing in the New World, converting the "heathen" Indians. I would not recommend this book for any reason, and I don't think it's something children would enjoy. It insults their intelligence and is incredibly dull. 2002 (orig. 1968), Herald Press, Ages 9 to 11.
—Mike Spaeth

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780836118131
Publisher:
MennoMedia
Publication date:
05/16/2007
Series:
Louise A. Vernon Religious Heritage Series
Pages:
144
Sales rank:
1,364,845
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 8.50(d)
Age Range:
9 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

Louise A. Vernon was born in Coquille, Oregon. As children, her grandparents crossed the Great Plains in covered wagons. After graduating from Willamette University, she studied music and creative writing, which she taught in the San Jose public schools.

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Key to the Prison 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago