Khaled [Bonus Tracks]

Khaled [Bonus Tracks]

by Khaled
     
 

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Dropping the "Cheb" from his name symbolizes the start of a new phase for Khaled, one that signaled his quest to expand beyond his rai roots or, more accurately, to add rai as another element in the global dancefloor mix. After his big production collaboration with fellow Algerian Safy Boutella on Kutche, he takes the plunge toSee more details below

Overview

Dropping the "Cheb" from his name symbolizes the start of a new phase for Khaled, one that signaled his quest to expand beyond his rai roots or, more accurately, to add rai as another element in the global dancefloor mix. After his big production collaboration with fellow Algerian Safy Boutella on Kutche, he takes the plunge to directly court Western audiences by enlisting Don Was and Michael Brook to split the production duties on Khaled. The opening "Didi" sets the tone, with a catchy Arabic synth melody and punchy Algerian percussion rolling underneath a funky groove and a King Curtis/Clarence Clemons-flavored sax solo. "Mauvais Sang" starts with the classic Algerian vocal/keyboard intro and gets more complex as melodic motifs are woven in. But the rhythm is driven by keyboard bass blasts and a drum machine, and the instrumental break features sax over a thumbed, pop-funk bass and James Brown scratch-rhythm guitar before the final call-and-response between David McMurray's throaty R&B sax and Mustapha Kada's Arabic keyboards. To say that's a blueprint of what Khaled wants to accomplish here is true on one level, but ignores the range and variety of the material. Algerian homeboys Kada (keyboards) and Mohsein Chentouf (derbouka) are on every song and Khaled himself plays keyboards, accordion, oud, and bendir on the Brook-produced tracks. Reggae pops into the bubbling rhythm undercurrent on "Ragda"; "Sbabi" works violin against an atmospheric, Robert Fripp-like lead guitar over Khaled's voice and a funky, chunky groove. With its near-flamenco acoustic guitar and accordion, "Wahrane" has a French café feel, but "El Ghatli" and "Harai Harai" take it all the way home to Algerian tradition. "Ne M'en Voulez Pas" is sung in French, with more café accordion set against organ, bass solo, and clattering percussion, and winds up in a near-go-go beat. The song is too busy and never quite makes up its mind what it wants to be, but it's a unique, invigorating ride, which may be the best capsule summary for Khaled. Some artists are born to try this kind of cultural crossover, and in the context of rai, Khaled is both trailblazer and standard-bearer. [This version of the album contains bonus material.]

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Product Details

Release Date:
08/23/2005
Label:
Wrasse Records
UPC:
0875232005228
catalogNumber:
156
Rank:
237816

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Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Khaled   Primary Artist,Indexed Contributor,Accordion,Vocals,Oud,Bendir
Bill Bergman   Tenor Saxophone
Sweet Pea Atkinson   Background Vocals
Harry Bowens   Background Vocals
Michael Brook   Bass,Guitar,Percussion
David Daoud Coleman   Oud,Electric Cello
David McMurray   Saxophone
Willy N'For   Bass
James Pinker   Drums
Greg "Frosty" Smith   Baritone Saxophone
Don Was   Bass,Keyboards
Arnold McCuller   Background Vocals
Randy Jacobs   Bass,Guitar
John Berry   Trumpet
Youssef Chebaan   Violin
Abderaseque Hilal   Violin
Mustapha Kada   Keyboards
Benjamin Muhoberac   Keyboards
Afid Saidi   Drums
Alma de Noche   Guitar
Eric Fernandez   Guitar
Djoum   Percussion

Technical Credits

Michael Brook   Producer,Audio Production
Doug Sax   Mastering
Don Was   Producer,Audio Production
Khaled Hadj Brahim   Composer
Djoum   Engineer
Marc Antoine Moreau   Executive Producer

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