Kid A [Bonus Disc]

( 1 )

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
Laser show operators, rejoice: This generation's weightiest purveyors of prog-pop have returned to action -- and rest assured, they haven't moved an inch closer to the middle of the road on this outing. If anything, Thom Yorke and company seem intent on seeing how far they can push the envelope -- a tone that's set with the paranoiac, piano-driven opener "Everything in Its Right Place." The undulating layers of sound that swell through that song give way to the title cut's dizzying thicket of chattering voices, which in turn drift into a noisy reed duel that dominates "The National Anthem" most assuredly not the tune you hear before sporting events. Although not as ...
See more details below
CD
$21.05
BN.com price
(Save 8%)$22.99 List Price
Other sellers (CD)
  • All (3) from $19.03   
  • New (3) from $19.03   

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
Laser show operators, rejoice: This generation's weightiest purveyors of prog-pop have returned to action -- and rest assured, they haven't moved an inch closer to the middle of the road on this outing. If anything, Thom Yorke and company seem intent on seeing how far they can push the envelope -- a tone that's set with the paranoiac, piano-driven opener "Everything in Its Right Place." The undulating layers of sound that swell through that song give way to the title cut's dizzying thicket of chattering voices, which in turn drift into a noisy reed duel that dominates "The National Anthem" most assuredly not the tune you hear before sporting events. Although not as conceptually unified as OK Computer, Kid A is every bit as distanced from standard rock structure. This time around, the band have shed even more of their guitar orientation, replacing Jonny Greenwood's angular riffs with equally bristly piano lines and dense rhythm beds that split the difference between the tribal and the industrial. The decision to treat Yorke's voice as just another element in the instrumental mix is an interesting one, albeit one that makes it difficult to discern precisely what it is he's going on about in some songs. There's no mistaking the mood, however: Virtually every song is clad in dark hues, minor chords, and oppressive rhythms. On occasion, that bubbles over into wild-eyed aggression, as on the deceptively titled "Optimistic," but there are far more whispers than cries in the grooves of these ten songs. While it's not the easiest album in the world to get inside, Kid A's obsessiveness and complexity make it even more difficult to escape once you've found a way in.
All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Instead of simply adding club beats or sonic collage techniques, Radiohead strive to incorporate the unsettling "intelligent techno" sound of Autechre and Aphex Twin, characterized by its skittering beats and stylishly dark sonic surfaces, for Kid A. To their immense credit, Radiohead don't sound like carpetbaggers, because they share the same post-postmodern vantage point as their inspirations. As a result, Kid A is easily the most successful electronica album from a rock band -- it doesn't even sound like a rock band, even if it does sound like Radiohead. So, Kid A is an unqualified success? Well, not quite. Despite its admirable ambition, Kid A is never as visionary or stunning as OK Computer, nor does it really repay the time it demands. OK Computer required many plays before revealing the intricacies of its densely layered mix; here, multiple plays are necessary to discern the music's form, to get a handle on quiet, drifting, minimally arranged songs with no hooks. Of course, the natural reaction of any serious record geek is that if the music demands so much work, it must be worth it -- and at times, that supposition is true. But Kid A's challenge doesn't always live up to its end of the bargain. It's self-consciously alienating and difficult, and while that can be intriguing, it seems deeper than it actually is. Repeated plays dissipate the mystique and reveal a number of rather drab songs (primarily during the second half), where there isn't enough under the surface to make Radiohead's relentless experimentation satisfying. But mixed results are still results, and about half of the songs positively shimmer with genius. [The bonus disc on EMI's expanded 2009 reissue of Kid A hammers home how Radiohead precisely crafted the album proper. Radiohead pulled no singles from Kid A, so there are no B-sides or EPs with unheard songs and remixes, only live versions of almost all the album's songs (only "Kid A" and "Treefingers" are not here): a four-song BBC Radio One session from November 15, 2000, a version of "Optimistic" from Lamacq Live in Concert in October 2000, a seven-song set at Canal+ Studios in April 2001 and "True Love Waits" from the I Might Be Wrong: Live Recordings EP. While there may not be any little-known gems, the bonus material is quite useful in how it opens up and warms the sometimes chilly Kid A, illustrating the core strength of the material plus Radiohead's force as a live band.]
Rolling Stone - David Fricke
...a clear-eyed space opera about a plausible future ­ a generation raised like plant life. And inside the hermetic electronics and art-pop frost is a heated argument about conformity, individuality and the messy consequences of playing God.
Entertainment Weekly - David Browne
As unnervingly cryptic as Kid A can be, it is a genuinely challenging work in a generally unchallenging time. It’s the Ralph Nader of pop.

...a clear-eyed space opera about a plausible future ­ a generation raised like plant life. And inside the hermetic electronics and art-pop frost is a heated argument about conformity, individuality and the messy consequences of playing God.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 8/25/2009
  • Label: Parlophone (Wea)
  • UPC: 603497912537
  • Catalog Number: 791253
  • Sales rank: 72,870

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Radiohead Primary Artist
Stan Harrison Baritone Saxophone
Mark Lockheart Tenor Saxophone
John Lubbock Conductor
Orchestra of Saint Johns Ensemble
Martin Hathaway Alto Saxophone
Andy (Stewart) Hamilton Tenor Saxophone
Andy Bush Trumpet
Technical Credits
Radiohead Composer
Miti Adhikari Producer
Chris Blair Mastering
Jim Warren Engineer
Henry Binns Rhythm Programming
Nigel Godrich Engineer, Live Recording
Jonny Greenwood Score
Jean Luc Lemerre Live Recording
Gerard Navarro Engineer
Graeme Stewart Engineer
Sam Cunningham Producer
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Electronica + Radiohead = Kid A

    When Radiohead's "Kid A" was first released in 2000, it went to Number One before anyone even realized it. It also alienated and frustrated a lot of listeners. Anyone expecting to hear the catchy folk-pop of "High And Dry" or the feedback-laden rock of "Karma Police" got a genuine shock when they discovered "Kid A" was spare-synthed electronica with singer Thom Yorke singing in what appeared to be in a state of distant desperation. Once the shock wore off, however, people realized that Radiohead was indeed one of the most original rock bands of the last decade. What seperated the group from the "emo" bands was that Yorke and Company seemed to take Brian Eno's starkness to heart (while utilizing technology and instrumentation that Eno would be very proud of). The album hasn't lost any of its bare-boned shine after all these years. In fact, many of the songs, particularly "How To Disappear Completely" and "Everything In Its Right Place" sound like the kind of music that Joy Division could have done if Ian Curtis lived long enough to get his hands on a synth programmer. At the time, "Kid A" actually scared some people. It scared Yorke enough to go back into the studio and quickly record another album that turned out to be quite similiar called "Amnesiac". But "Kid A", now available in a special edition with a second disc that includes some impressive live tracks, is in a class all by itself.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews