Kid A

Kid A

4.4 49
by Radiohead
     
 

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Laser show operators, rejoice: This generation's weightiest purveyors of prog-pop have returned to action -- and rest assured, they haven't moved an inch closer to the middle of the road on this outing. If anything, Thom Yorke and company seem intent on seeing how far they can push the envelope -- a tone that's set with the paranoiac, piano-driven opener "Everything… See more details below

Overview

Laser show operators, rejoice: This generation's weightiest purveyors of prog-pop have returned to action -- and rest assured, they haven't moved an inch closer to the middle of the road on this outing. If anything, Thom Yorke and company seem intent on seeing how far they can push the envelope -- a tone that's set with the paranoiac, piano-driven opener "Everything in Its Right Place." The undulating layers of sound that swell through that song give way to the title cut's dizzying thicket of chattering voices, which in turn drift into a noisy reed duel that dominates "The National Anthem" (most assuredly not the tune you hear before sporting events). Although not as conceptually unified as OK Computer, Kid A is every bit as distanced from standard rock structure. This time around, the band have shed even more of their guitar orientation, replacing Jonny Greenwood's angular riffs with equally bristly piano lines and dense rhythm beds that split the difference between the tribal and the industrial. The decision to treat Yorke's voice as just another element in the instrumental mix is an interesting one, albeit one that makes it difficult to discern precisely what it is he's going on about in some songs. There's no mistaking the mood, however: Virtually every song is clad in dark hues, minor chords, and oppressive rhythms. On occasion, that bubbles over into wild-eyed aggression, as on the deceptively titled "Optimistic," but there are far more whispers than cries in the grooves of these ten songs. While it's not the easiest album in the world to get inside, Kid A's obsessiveness and complexity make it even more difficult to escape once you've found a way in.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Instead of simply adding club beats or sonic collage techniques, Radiohead strive to incorporate the unsettling "intelligent techno" sound of Autechre and Aphex Twin, characterized by its skittering beats and stylishly dark sonic surfaces, for Kid A. To their immense credit, Radiohead don't sound like carpetbaggers, because they share the same post-postmodern vantage point as their inspirations. Kid A is easily the most successful electronica album from a rock band: it doesn't even sound like a rock band, even if it does sound like Radiohead.
Rolling Stone - David Fricke
...a clear-eyed space opera about a plausible future ­ a generation raised like plant life. And inside the hermetic electronics and art-pop frost is a heated argument about conformity, individuality and the messy consequences of playing God.
Entertainment Weekly - David Browne
As unnervingly cryptic as Kid A can be, it is a genuinely challenging work in a generally unchallenging time. It’s the Ralph Nader of pop.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/03/2000
Label:
Parlophone (Wea)
UPC:
0724352775323
catalogNumber:
277539
Rank:
17448

Related Subjects

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Radiohead   Primary Artist
Stan Harrison   Baritone Horn
Mark Lockheart   Tenor Horn
John Lubbock   Conductor
Henry Binns   Sampling
Colin Greenwood   Bass
Jonny Greenwood   Guitar
Ed O'Brien   Guitar,Vocals
Phil Selway   Drums
Thom Yorke   Vocals
Steve Hamilton   Alto Horn
Andy Bush   Trumpet

Technical Credits

Radiohead   Engineer
Nigel Godrich   Producer,Engineer
Colin Greenwood   Composer
Jonny Greenwood   Composer
Ed O'Brien   Composer,Programming
Phil Selway   Composer
Thom Yorke   Composer,Programming
Graeme Stewart   Engineer
Tchocky   Artwork

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