Kidnapped and Sold by Indians: True Story of Settler Child

Kidnapped and Sold by Indians: True Story of Settler Child

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by Matthew Brayton
     
 
This first-hand narrative of the life of Matthew Brayton, a seven-and-a-half year old white child of a settler who was kidnapped and sold many times by Native Americans in the beginning of the 19th century, probably doesn't share all the gory details of his abuse when initially captured, but you can read between the lines.

Still, this first-hand account

Overview

This first-hand narrative of the life of Matthew Brayton, a seven-and-a-half year old white child of a settler who was kidnapped and sold many times by Native Americans in the beginning of the 19th century, probably doesn't share all the gory details of his abuse when initially captured, but you can read between the lines.

Still, this first-hand account does shed much light on what it was really like to come under the charge of many different Indian tribes. Although Brayton's treatment was not entirely negative or positive, his frank and blunt story does much to dispel the romantic stories that have been perpetuated about young settlers' children who became Indian chattel. It does much to tell true history and dispel any deliberate or accidental revisions. In many cases the Indians treated Brayton well, but there can be no doubt that they stole from him and his family a life that would end up confused and stuck between two worlds.

Although Brayton did finally unite with many of his natural family, he never stopped identifying with Native Americans, and he was forced to leave an Indian wife and child behind. In fact, when the War of Rebellion or Civil War broke out, Brayton enlisted and served in an American Indian brigade.

Chet Dembeck

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940011912689
Publisher:
Publisher of One
Publication date:
10/19/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
229,369
File size:
107 KB

Meet the Author

Brayton's tale of being kidnapped and sold by Indians is a powerful account of frontier history as it really was -- not as we would want it to be. Although his language is simple and sometimes blunt and understated, the book conjures up great emotions in most that read it.

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Kidnapped and Sold by Indians 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 51 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This tale is a first-person, no frills account by a man who was kidnapped and traded by Indians to several tribes. It is about being torn between two worlds; it's about being torn in two. I loved it. It isn't the kind of story where the author pours his heart out, but you can read between the lines. It might turn some people off, because it shows the situation as it was -- not what some "He Dance With Wolves" fantasy shows.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
All American Indians weren't great buddies to settler children they kidnapped. In fact, this true story of one such child is both fascinating and disturbing, but never disappointing. It's a must read for anybody interested in real frontier history.
Keg-Runner More than 1 year ago
Very short story - great thing to take along if expecting to wait for an appointment - can read within an hour and half. It's unfortunate the author did not give a detailed account of his time with the Indians or that more background wasn't given about the settlers attitudes toward the Indians at that time and vice versa. Could have been a wealth of knowledge; however, in spite of the brevity of the work, it does give a powerful insight into human nature and the innate desire to be bonded to family.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really enjoyed the true life stories from the person who lived through it. Great ending but too bad he could not bring his wife and kids with him to improve their way of life.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The story is more about how the indians lived not how Mathew "suffered"
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
juleecm1 More than 1 year ago
This book is interesting, but seems to be told by someone who is not very descriptive. He tells the story in a factual way, but not much emotion comes through. It is short (and they disclose this before you buy the book), as well. The boy didn't even remember the kidnapping and thought he was Indian as he got older. I wish more of the emotion had been expressed, but it is still a very interesting description of his life living with Native Americans. He was bought and sold many times to different tribes, and the details of his life are certainly unusual. It's equally unusual what happens when he gets older, but I don't want to spoil the ending. I'd say it's worth reading because he has such a very unusual life compared to most people, and you learn some things about frontier life, but don't expect any emotional revelations.
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Very interesting book
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Sugo More than 1 year ago
a good accounting of a young boy's life changed so abruptly
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book. It was interesting to see how life was lived during the time frame covered by the author. He seemed to simply impart facts, rather than judgment.
mellis More than 1 year ago
It was good considering it was a time none of us have a first hand experience with.
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