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Kidnapped

Overview

Kidnapped is set in 1751, during the time of the Jacobite rebellion — a tumultuous and tragic period in Scottish history. When David Balfour sets out to find his uncle, he never dreamed that he would be kidnapped — but saved from a life of slavery — and thrown from one escapade to another in the company of the fugitive, masterful swordsman Alan Breck Stewart. They meet on the brig Covenant just before they are shipwrecked off the coast of Scotland. After witnessing the murder of Colin Campbell (the notorious “Red...

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Overview

Kidnapped is set in 1751, during the time of the Jacobite rebellion — a tumultuous and tragic period in Scottish history. When David Balfour sets out to find his uncle, he never dreamed that he would be kidnapped — but saved from a life of slavery — and thrown from one escapade to another in the company of the fugitive, masterful swordsman Alan Breck Stewart. They meet on the brig Covenant just before they are shipwrecked off the coast of Scotland. After witnessing the murder of Colin Campbell (the notorious “Red Fox”) David makes a dramatic and extraordinary flight for his life across Scotland before he can claim his rightful inheritance.

This new adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s Kidnapped, the dramatic and epic adventure story about a seventeen-year-old desperate to secure his inheritance, brings together two creative giants from the world of graphic novels — the absolute “dream team” of artist Cam Kennedy and scriptwriter Alan Grant.

In 1751 in Scotland, cheated out of his inheritance by a greedy uncle who has him kidnapped and put on a ship to the Carolinas, seventeen-year-old David Balfour escapes to the Highlands with the help of the Jacobite Alan Breck Stewart and there encounters further danger and intrigue as he attempts to clear his name and regain his property.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
If you are looking for a book of adventure, then this is a perfect choice. At the young age of seventeen, David Belfour sets out alone to search for an uncle he never knew he had. On his travels he is kidnapped and from there, his life becomes fraught with perils, adventure, and near death experiences. Fortunately he meets and becomes friends with a master-swordsman, and the two of them are able to successfully cross Scotland where David succeeds in claiming his heritage and inheritance. Kidnapped is filled with excitement and captures the reader’s interest right from the beginning. The author includes a yellow box on every page that holds the thoughts of David; this helps with the comprehension of the story. This book is written in graphic format. It makes it perfect for students who are reluctant readers who never seem to finish a book on their own. Young adults who want to read anything they can get their hands on will also enjoy the graphics and fast-paced text. The full color graphics make an enormous impact on the story. Graphic novels also provide a comfortable length for reluctant readers; yet they include the substance of the original novel. It is perfect for book reports and book discussions. I did not understand why or agree with the author capitalizing entire words throughout the book, with no grammatical reason for it, but I do highly recommend this book. Reviewer: Kathie M. Josephs
School Library Journal

Gr 7 Up
This retelling of Stevenson's classic hits the high points of what was originally a densely written story, making it more palatable for reluctant readers or those who want to revisit the original. The text and dialogue retain the spirit of the novel, but the hard-to-read Scottish accents are softened and the passages in which characters speak to each other in Latin have been removed. On the whole this is an engaging adaptation, aided by Kennedy's vibrant illustrations in a palette dominated by blues, greens, and sepia tones. The action scenes are exciting, and readers will get a good feel for the dangers of the sea and the beauty of the Scottish Highlands. However, adapting some parts of the book and using other parts verbatim can be confusing. For example, the last sentence, about David Balfour finding the doors of the British Linen Company's bank, is quoted verbatim. Earlier mention of this bank is not included, which might leave readers wondering why it is significant. Quibbles aside, this book would make a good bridge to the novel for readers who want to delve deeper into the story, and will also prove to those readers who think they hate classics that some of them are actually kind of cool.
—Andrea LipinskiCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780887768439
  • Publisher: Tundra
  • Publication date: 10/9/2007
  • Pages: 64
  • Age range: 10 years
  • Product dimensions: 6.78 (w) x 10.18 (h) x 0.31 (d)

Meet the Author

Alan Grant’s work includes Judge Dredd, Strontium Dog, Robo-Hunter and Ace Trucking Co., Doomlord, Joe Soap Private Eye, The Outsider, The Last American, Detective Comics, Shadow of the Bat, Legends of the Dark Knight, and The Demon.

Cam Kennedy is known internationally for his portrayals of Judge Dredd and Rogue Trooper, Daredevil, Batman, Star Wars: Dark Empire, and Star Wars: Dark Empire 2 — the two series that relaunched the Star Wars franchise in comics.

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Read an Excerpt

Introduction by Margot Livesey

I.

When I was growing up in Scotland, Robert Louis Stevenson was the first author whom I knew by name, and he remains the only one whom I can truthfully claim to have been reading all my life. From an early age, my parents read to me from A Child's Garden of Verses, and I soon learned some of the poems by heart.

I have a little shadow
that goes in and out with me,
And what can be the use of him
is more than I can see.

Perhaps I recognized, even then, Stevenson's unique gift for keeping a foot in two camps. While the poems vividly captured my childish concerns, somewhere in the margins shimmered the mystery of adult life. A few years later Kidnapped was the first chapter book I read, and I can still picture the maroon binding and the black-and-white drawings that illustrated David Balfour's adventures. At the age of seven, a book without pictures would have been out of the question, but, in fact, they turned out to be superfluous. I could imagine everything that happened just from the words on the page, although I must admit to the small advantage that the view from my bedroom window--bare hills, rocks, heather--was very much like the landscape of Kidnapped.

At first glance such early acquaintance might seem like a good omen for an author's reputation. In actuality, that Stevenson is so widely read by children has tended to make him seem like an author from who, as adults, we have little to learn. It is worth noting that his contemporaries would not have shared this prejudice. Nineteenth-century readers did not regard children's books as separate species. Stevenson's own father oftenreread The Parent's Assistant, a volume of children's stories, and Leslie Stephen, Virginia Woolf's father, writes of staying up late to finish Treasure Island.

Like the shadow of his poem, Stevenson's reputation has waxed and waned at an alarming rate. He died in a blaze of hagiography, which perhaps in part explains the fury of later critics. F.R. Leavis in The Great Tradition dismisses Stevenson (in a footnote, no less) as a romantic writer, guilty of fine writing, and in general Stevenson has not fared as well as his friend Henry James. People comment with amazement that Borges and Nabokov praised his novels. Still, his best work has remained in print for over a hundred years, and his is among that small group of authors to have given a phrase to the language: Jekyll and Hyde.

Besides our perception of Stevenson as a children's author, two other factors may have contributed to his ambiguous reputation. Although his list of publications is much longer than most people realize--he wrote journalism and travel pieces for money--he failed to produce a recognizable oeuvre, a group of works that stand together, each resonating with the others. In addition, the pendulum of literary taste has swung in a direction that Stevenson disliked and was determined to avoid: namely, pessimism. After reading The Portrait of a Lady he wrote to James begging him to write no more such books, and while he admired the early work of Thomas Hardy, he hated the darker Tess of the d'Urbervilles. The English writer John Galsworthy commented memorably on this aspect of Stevenson when he said that the superiority of Stevenson over Hardy was that Stevenson was all life, while Hardy was all death.


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