The Kidnapped Prince: The Life of Olaudah Equiano

The Kidnapped Prince: The Life of Olaudah Equiano

4.1 8
by Ann Cameron
     
 

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Kidnapped at the age of 11 from his home in Benin, Africa, Olaudah Equiano spent the next 11 years as a slave in England, the U.S., and the West Indies, until he was able to buy his freedom. His autobiography, published in 1789, was a bestseller in its own time. Cameron has modernized and shortened it while remaining true to the spirit of the original. It's a

Overview

Kidnapped at the age of 11 from his home in Benin, Africa, Olaudah Equiano spent the next 11 years as a slave in England, the U.S., and the West Indies, until he was able to buy his freedom. His autobiography, published in 1789, was a bestseller in its own time. Cameron has modernized and shortened it while remaining true to the spirit of the original. It's a gripping story of adventure, betrayal, cruelty, and courage. In searing scenes, Equiano describes the savagery of his capture, the appalling conditions on the slave ship, the auction, and the forced labor. . . . Kids will read this young man's story on their own; it will also enrich curriculum units on history and on writing.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Kidnapped at the age of 11 from his home in Benin, Africa, Olaudah Equiano spent the next 11 years as a slave in England, the U.S., and the West Indies, until he was able to buy his freedom. His autobiography, published in 1789, was a bestseller in its own time. Cameron has modernized and shortened it while remaining true to the spirit of the original. It's a gripping story of adventure, betrayal, cruelty, and courage. In searing scenes, Equiano describes the savagery of his capture, the appalling conditions on the slave ship, the auction, and the forced labor. . . . Kids will read this young man's story on their own; it will also enrich curriculum units on history and on writing."
—Booklist, Boxed Review

"The inspired simplicity of Cameron's adaptation quickly allows Equiano's gifted voice to establish a compelling relationship between himself and young readers. Well-sculpted with detail . . . his story is a must for multicultural or history collections."—School Library Journal

"Readers . . . will be fascinated by the details in this account."—The Bulletin

Children's Literature - Dr. Judy Rowen
Olaudah Equiano was born in the kingdom of Benin, the child of local royalty. He was kidnapped and sold into slavery, first within Africa and then in the New World. Despite the difficulties he faced, he learned many skills-including the crucial ability to read. The injustices, terror and cruelty that slaves suffered were detailed in his memoirs which were published after he bought his freedom. Ann Cameron has adapted his narrative by shortening the text and updating the language. The cadence of the times is retained, and the book remains a riveting portrait of the horrors of slavery.
School Library Journal
Gr 6 Up-Born the son of a chief in the kingdom of Benin, 11-year-old Olaudah Equiano lived an idyllic life until the day he and his sister were kidnapped by traders and sold into slavery. Nothing could have prepared him for this devastating experience. And yet, after a period of adjustment, he was able to live a purposeful and positive life. Serving various sea captains, he sailed to a number of places, including the West Indies, Virginia, Philadelphia, London, Charleston, and Savannah; learned how to read and write; and fought in the French and Indian War. After earning enough money to purchase his freedom at age 21, he settled in England and wrote his autobiography, becoming a spokesperson for the abolition of slavery and an advisor to free blacks. The inspired simplicity of Cameron's adaptation quickly allows Equiano's gifted voice to establish a compelling relationship between himself and young readers. Well sculpted with detail, the book describes practices of slavery among Africans, the press gang, and the dangers of being a free black. The author reflects upon African tribal life and the contrasts among the various white people he encounters. His story is more exciting than Elizabeth Yates's Amos Fortune, Free Man (Dutton, 1967) and is a must for multicultural or history collections.-Cindy Darling Codell, Clark Middle School, Winchester, KY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375803468
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
01/28/2000
Edition description:
1ST KNOPF
Pages:
160
Sales rank:
475,710
Product dimensions:
6.48(w) x 7.56(h) x 0.39(d)
Lexile:
840L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Ann Cameron is the author of many popular and award-winning books for children, including The Stories Julian Tells, The Stories Huey Tells, and The Most Beautiful Place in the World.

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Kidnapped Prince: The Life of Olaudah Equiano 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is so so so sad why did there ever have to be slaves and why did they have to kidnap a boy at such a young age and make him their slave for eleven more years I hope this is not a true story because if it is im about to cry thank lord i was born in the free years a lot of questions remain about slaves but are not getting answers happy late black history month to every race because i am not about to be racist and only say happy black history month to black people because there are a lot of races that stood up to slavery maan i wish i was there to witness slavery .and i know i am doing a lot of talking but this type of stuff needs to be understood by them youngings and oldies that be racist and remember ,"treat people how you want to be treated back" thank you for all of your time you peacemakers im glad most of you understand what the word peace means thank you so much bye bye!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book it is so deep and intresting
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a good book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a good book about a kidnapped to be prince at just 11 years old its crazy what they did to slaves
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was ok, i had to read it for school, but a year went by in like, one page and it was SO sad so if you dont like sad books(like me) i would get a different book. It was pretty interesting though and you learn a lot about slavery.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sorry guys you just made me a little angry
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My social studies teacher is always hard at work to help her students at all times. Peaple at the middle school may call her strict or mean but i have to say she is the best teacher ever. She has many skills of remembering things and can dance to cha cha slide pretty darn good. MsI recommended this book because w e were learning about slaves. It is about a prince in first person point of veiw who is captured and takend to the states. His master figures out that he is educated and sets him free to finnish his educationu