Kidnapped [NOOK Book]

Overview

Shipwreck. Murder. Flight. Intrigue. And of course, kidnapping. David Balfour's adventures on the high seas are among the most evocative in classic literature.

A sixteen-year-old orphan is kidnapped by his villainous uncle, but later escapes and becomes involved in the struggle of the Scottish highlanders against English rule.

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Kidnapped

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Overview

Shipwreck. Murder. Flight. Intrigue. And of course, kidnapping. David Balfour's adventures on the high seas are among the most evocative in classic literature.

A sixteen-year-old orphan is kidnapped by his villainous uncle, but later escapes and becomes involved in the struggle of the Scottish highlanders against English rule.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
If you are looking for a book of adventure, then this is a perfect choice. At the young age of seventeen, David Belfour sets out alone to search for an uncle he never knew he had. On his travels he is kidnapped and from there, his life becomes fraught with perils, adventure, and near death experiences. Fortunately he meets and becomes friends with a master-swordsman, and the two of them are able to successfully cross Scotland where David succeeds in claiming his heritage and inheritance. Kidnapped is filled with excitement and captures the reader’s interest right from the beginning. The author includes a yellow box on every page that holds the thoughts of David; this helps with the comprehension of the story. This book is written in graphic format. It makes it perfect for students who are reluctant readers who never seem to finish a book on their own. Young adults who want to read anything they can get their hands on will also enjoy the graphics and fast-paced text. The full color graphics make an enormous impact on the story. Graphic novels also provide a comfortable length for reluctant readers; yet they include the substance of the original novel. It is perfect for book reports and book discussions. I did not understand why or agree with the author capitalizing entire words throughout the book, with no grammatical reason for it, but I do highly recommend this book. Reviewer: Kathie M. Josephs
Children's Literature - Naomi Butler
When young David Balfour's father dies and leaves him in poverty, David tracks down his Uncle Ebenezer to seek his inheritance. But his uncle is a nasty man with a dark family secret. David finds himself in terrible danger when he is kidnapped and taken prisoner on board a ship bound for slavery—he must escape. With the help of daring rebel, Alan Beck, David faces a wild adventure as he is hunted across the desolate Scottish moors. This handsome paperback will draw the attention of students assigned to read the title and/or the casual reader who has heard of the story, as well as the re-reader. The Puffin classics have been hailed as the most innovative and imaginative children's literature for generations. There is a nice introduction by Alexander McCall Smith that sets the story in the time and place. There is an "Author File," "Who's Who In Kidnapped," "Some Things To Think About," "Some Things to Do," "Jacobite Scotland, A Scottish Glossary," and some suggestions for other Puffin titles. Reviewer: Naomi Butler
School Library Journal

Gr 7 Up
This retelling of Stevenson's classic hits the high points of what was originally a densely written story, making it more palatable for reluctant readers or those who want to revisit the original. The text and dialogue retain the spirit of the novel, but the hard-to-read Scottish accents are softened and the passages in which characters speak to each other in Latin have been removed. On the whole this is an engaging adaptation, aided by Kennedy's vibrant illustrations in a palette dominated by blues, greens, and sepia tones. The action scenes are exciting, and readers will get a good feel for the dangers of the sea and the beauty of the Scottish Highlands. However, adapting some parts of the book and using other parts verbatim can be confusing. For example, the last sentence, about David Balfour finding the doors of the British Linen Company's bank, is quoted verbatim. Earlier mention of this bank is not included, which might leave readers wondering why it is significant. Quibbles aside, this book would make a good bridge to the novel for readers who want to delve deeper into the story, and will also prove to those readers who think they hate classics that some of them are actually kind of cool.
—Andrea LipinskiCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

From the Publisher
"Crossley reads this tale as its author might have. Adept at the language of the region and times, Crossley deftly brings one of literature's best-known stories to the ears of contemporary listeners." —-AudioFile
School Library Journal
Gr 5 Up—Robert Louis Stevenson's 1886 classic, a timeless tale of betrayal and friendship, comes to life through the brilliant narration of Steven Crossley. His Scottish accent draws listeners in as he weaves the story of David Balfour's kidnapping, escape, and battle for his inheritance. Teens may be confused by the Scottish historic references, particularly those relating to the Jacobite rebellions. Scottish words like "ken" are used frequently, but are usually understandable in context. A searchable PDF ebook of the novel is included on the first CD. A swashbuckling adventure story.—Samantha Larsen Hasting, Riverton Library, South Riverton, UT
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781300158660
  • Publisher: Lulu.com
  • Publication date: 3/13/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 850,995
  • File size: 475 KB

Meet the Author

Robert Louis  Stevenson

Robert Louis Stevenson was born in 1850 in Edinburgh, the son of an engineer. He briefly studied engineering, then law, and contributed to university magazines while a student. Despite life-long poor health, he was an enthusiastic traveller, writing about European travels in the late 1870s and marrying in America in 1879. He contributed to various periodicals, writing first essays and later fiction. His first novel was Treasure Island in 1883, intended for his stepson, who collaborated with Stevenson on two later novels. Some of Stevenson's subsequent novels are insubstantial popular romances, but others possess a deepening psychological intensity. He also wrote a handful of plays in collaboration with W.E. Henley. In 1888, he left England for his health, and never returned, eventually settling in Samoa after travelling in the Pacific islands. His time here was one of relatively good health and considerable writing, as well as of deepening concern for the Polynesian islanders under European exploitation, expressed in fictional and factual writing from his final years, some of which was so contrary to contemporary culture that a full text remained unavailable until well after Stevenson's death. R. L. Stevenson died of a brain haemorrhage in 1894.

Biography

Robert Louis Stevenson was born in 1850 in Edinburgh. His father was an engineer, the head of a family firm that had constructed most of Scotland's lighthouses, and the family had a comfortable income. Stevenson was an only child and was often ill; as a result, he was much coddled by both his parents and his long-time nurse. The family took frequent trips to southern Europe to escape the cruel Edinburgh winters, trips that, along with his many illnesses, caused Stevenson to miss much of his formal schooling. He entered Edinburgh University in 1867, intending to become an engineer and enter the family business, but he was a desultory, disengaged student and never took a degree. In 1871, Stevenson switched his study to law, a profession which would leave time for his already-budding literary ambitions, and he managed to pass the bar in 1875.

Illness put an end to his legal career before it had even started, and Stevenson spent the next few years traveling in Europe and writing travel essays and literary criticism. In 1876, Stevenson fell in love with Fanny Vandergrift Osbourne, a married American woman more than ten years his senior, and returned with her to London, where he published his first fiction, "The Suicide Club." In 1879, Stevenson set sail for America, apparently in response to a telegram from Fanny, who had returned to California in an attempt to reconcile with her husband. Fanny obtained a divorce and the couple married in 1880, eventually returning to Europe, where they lived for the next several years. Stevenson was by this time beset by terrifying lung hemorrhages that would appear without warning and required months of convalescence in a healthy climate. Despite his periodic illnesses and his peripatetic life, Stevenson completed some of his most enduring works during this period: Treasure Island (1883), A Child's Garden of Verses (1885), Kidnapped (1886), and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886).

After his father's death and a trip to Edinburgh which he knew would be his last, Stevenson set sail once more for America in 1887 with his wife, mother, and stepson. In 1888, after spending a frigid winter in the Adirondack Mountains, Stevenson chartered a yacht and set sail from California bound for the South Pacific. The Stevensons spent time in Tahiti, Hawaii, Micronesia, and Australia, before settling in Samoa, where Stevenson bought a plantation called Vailima. Though he kept up a vigorous publishing schedule, Stevenson never returned to Europe. He died of a sudden brain hemorrhage on December 3, 1894.

Author biography from the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Good To Know

It has been said that Stevenson may well be the inventor of the sleeping bag -- he described a large fleece-lined sack he brought along to sleep in on a journey through France in his book Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes.

Long John Silver, the one-legged pirate cook in Stevenson's classic Treasure Island, is said to be based on the author's friend William Ernest Henley, whom he met when Henley was in Edinburgh for surgery to save his one good leg from tuberculosis.

Stevenson died in 1894 at Vailima,, his home on the South Pacific island of Upolu, Samoa. He was helping his wife make mayonnaise for dinner when he suffered a fatal stroke.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson
    1. Date of Birth:
      November 13, 1850
    2. Place of Birth:
      Edinburgh, Scotland
    1. Date of Death:
      December 3, 1894
    2. Place of Death:
      Vailima, Samoa

Read an Excerpt

Introduction by Margot Livesey

I.

When I was growing up in Scotland, Robert Louis Stevenson was the first author whom I knew by name, and he remains the only one whom I can truthfully claim to have been reading all my life. From an early age, my parents read to me from A Child's Garden of Verses, and I soon learned some of the poems by heart.

I have a little shadow
that goes in and out with me,
And what can be the use of him
is more than I can see.

Perhaps I recognized, even then, Stevenson's unique gift for keeping a foot in two camps. While the poems vividly captured my childish concerns, somewhere in the margins shimmered the mystery of adult life. A few years later Kidnapped was the first chapter book I read, and I can still picture the maroon binding and the black-and-white drawings that illustrated David Balfour's adventures. At the age of seven, a book without pictures would have been out of the question, but, in fact, they turned out to be superfluous. I could imagine everything that happened just from the words on the page, although I must admit to the small advantage that the view from my bedroom window—bare hills, rocks, heather—was very much like the landscape of Kidnapped.

At first glance such early acquaintance might seem like a good omen for an author's reputation. In actuality, that Stevenson is so widely read by children has tended to make him seem like an author from who, as adults, we have little to learn. It is worth noting that his contemporaries would not have shared this prejudice. Nineteenth-century readers did not regard children's books as separate species. Stevenson's ownfather often reread The Parent's Assistant, a volume of children's stories, and Leslie Stephen, Virginia Woolf's father, writes of staying up late to finish Treasure Island.

Like the shadow of his poem, Stevenson's reputation has waxed and waned at an alarming rate. He died in a blaze of hagiography, which perhaps in part explains the fury of later critics. F.R. Leavis in The Great Tradition dismisses Stevenson (in a footnote, no less) as a romantic writer, guilty of fine writing, and in general Stevenson has not fared as well as his friend Henry James. People comment with amazement that Borges and Nabokov praised his novels. Still, his best work has remained in print for over a hundred years, and his is among that small group of authors to have given a phrase to the language: Jekyll and Hyde.

Besides our perception of Stevenson as a children's author, two other factors may have contributed to his ambiguous reputation. Although his list of publications is much longer than most people realize—he wrote journalism and travel pieces for money—he failed to produce a recognizable oeuvre, a group of works that stand together, each resonating with the others. In addition, the pendulum of literary taste has swung in a direction that Stevenson disliked and was determined to avoid: namely, pessimism. After reading The Portrait of a Lady he wrote to James begging him to write no more such books, and while he admired the early work of Thomas Hardy, he hated the darker Tess of the d'Urbervilles. The English writer John Galsworthy commented memorably on this aspect of Stevenson when he said that the superiority of Stevenson over Hardy was that Stevenson was all life, while Hardy was all death.


From the Paperback edition.

Copyright 2001 by Robert Louis Stevenson
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Table of Contents

Contents

Title Page,
Bibliographical Note,
Copyright Page,
Dedication,
Kidnapped,
1. I Set Off upon My Journey to the House of Shaws,
2. I Come to My Journey's End,
3. I Make Acquaintance of My Uncle,
4. I Run a Great Danger in the House of Shaws,
5. I Go to the Queen's Ferry,
6. What Befell at the Queen's Ferry,
7. I Go to Sea in the Brig Covenant of Dysart,
8. The Roundhouse,
9. The Man with the Belt of Gold,
10. The Siege of the Roundhouse,
11. The Captain Knuckles Under,
12. I Hear of the "Red Fox",
13. The Loss of the Brig,
14. The Islet,
15. The Lad with the Silver Button: Through the Isle of Mull,
16. The Lad with the Silver Button: Across Morven,
17. The Death of the Red Fox,
18. I Talk with Alan in the Wood of Lettermore,
19. The House of Fear,
20. The Flight in the Heather: The Rocks,
21. The Flight in the Heather: The Heugh of Corrynakiegh,
22. The Flight in the Heather: The Moor,
23. Cluny's Cage,
24. The Flight in the Heather: The Quarrel,
25. In Balquhidder,
26. End of the Flight: We Pass the Forth,
27. I Come to Mr. Rankeillor,
28. I Go in Quest of My Inheritance,
29. I come into My Kingdom,
30. Good-bye,

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 135 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(55)

4 Star

(34)

3 Star

(19)

2 Star

(12)

1 Star

(15)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 134 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2011

    I highly do not reccomend this book unless you speak old-english...

    I'm reading this book for a book report, oh my I can't understand anything anyone is saying, sometimes I can't even tell who is talking! There are like 20 "ye" 's on each page, and it's very boring most times. I also do not recommend this for 8th graders and under, especially ones with a small attention span like me. Its 263 pages so it takes awhile to read, waste of time. Overall I do not recommend this book unless you were born in the 1800's.

    10 out of 27 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2010

    I would recommend reading this.

    I thought it was a very good story and wasn't sure what the writing from that period would be like. I am very happy that I took the chance and downloaded the story. I usually read fiction crime thrillers and this book kept my attention and I read it as quickly as I do my other choices. The story follows a nice line and gives a nice packaged ending that one would expect, no real twists or anything of that kind.

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2007

    A reviewer

    this book really touched my heart

    6 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2013

    Great Book!

    I felt the urge to write this reveiew after reading one written March 21, 2011, in which the writer of the review was reading Kidnapped for school, and complained of the length (236 pages) and the oldfashioned writing. I have two things to say to that. One, when was written people, as individuals were much smarter than they are now, being able to read very complex books with difficult language, and comprehend them perfectly. Two, I happen to have read Nicholas Nickelby by Charles Dickens, which for your information is 755 pages long and i read it cover to cover. I am twelve. For those who want to know whether this is a good book or not, I highly reccomend it. Best of luck on your own readinging adventure!
    SGP

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 22, 2010

    Great story!

    The story moves along and is so well told, I felt as though I were witnessing it first hand.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 7, 2008

    Kidnapped: A tense but empathetic portrayal of highland strife

    Stevenson, well within his element in regards to the setting, re-demonstrates his mastery as a storyteller with Kidnapped; but unlike his works such as Treasure Island this compelling adventure story's plot and thematic elements are woven in the context of a real historical conflict. Through this spirited depiction of the Whig vs. Jacobite struggle, Stevenson is definitely trying to redeem the image of the Highlands that the English had strived so hard to tarnish back in his day. This is totally comprehensible in characters like Alan and James of the Glens who both exhibit noble manners and honor that was allegedly uncharacteristic of catholic scots in the 1700s. What's truly interesting in this book, however, is the centrality of the unlikely friendship between David Balfour and Alan Stewart. Despite their incredibly divergent upbringings (a rebellious catholic highlander and a goody-good protestant whig) they are able to transcend their own misapprehensions and prevail over the sprawling cast of cutthroats looking to sell them into bondage. Throughout this plot steeped in treachery and redemption, there are instances of benevolence and compassion revealed by the majority of misfortunes they experience, like when Alan loses their money to Cluny MacPherson. I think it's inventive how he uses the screw-ups to shed light on how important it is to swallow pride and resolve problems with the people you truly respect. I was also impressed with how the events of the story also preserved the importance of virtues like loyalty and valor, which surface from time to time in the highlander characters such as Macrob who continue the resistance for justice against English oppressors. Another entertaining aspect of the story is Stevenson's use of motifs in tying together its major plot elements. Much like the "hands" motiff in Treasure Island, Stevenson is very consistent in using themes like inheritance, especially primogeniture, to impress upon the reader what was principal or significant back in those times. All and all, it is a very exciting read and especially appealing to anyone of Scottish descent.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2013

    The orange

    Orang peels on crayon and sticks

    3 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2007

    Kidnapped

    Help! Help! Those are the words of David Balfour. David Balfour is a seventeen year old boy in a realistic fiction book called Kidnapped. In the book David¿s father is dieing so he gives a man named Mr. Campbell a letter to give to David. David receives the letter after his father dies and the letter says to go to a place called the house of Shaws. When David gets there he realizes that the man living there is his uncle. Later his uncle sells David to a ship captain named Hoseason for a slave because the house that his uncle lives in is David¿s and David¿s uncle wants it all to himself. Then a guy named Alan Breck Stewart comes on the ship. David overhears plot to get Alan¿s money so David warns Alan and they both fight the crew. Later David falls of the ship and swims back to land. I enjoyed this book and I would recommend it to anyone that likes action and adventure books. I would recommend the book because it was interesting. It was interesting because the author wrote the book in first-person point of view. This made the story come form the main characters eyes and thoughts. Also I would recommend it because the imagery that Robert Louis Stevenson used was great. The imagery that Robert Louis Stevenson used was great because when I was reading the book I could picture the events that were happening in the story.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2014

    Get a pink ipad

    Do it

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2014

    Him

    Pads to saved res one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2014

    Stillkit

    She sees the adult male and stares. What sh mews i am less than one moon what you come to save mw.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2014

    Convict

    No i like those guys their cool

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2014

    To convict

    Could you kidnap Claire at hlm res two or thirteen?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2014

    Snow

    Slave-- a white she cat that is a vir gin and her rper is new to this sort of stuff. Will follow orders

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2014

    To all Slaves

    Go to result three. One slave is there. Would one of you rp a tom and buy a cat called Jaypetal? Thanks

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2014

    Flame

    Slave-- Light orange tabby she-cat with black paws and blue eyes.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2014

    K thanks

    Btw my name is cal it can be changed though

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2014

    Book for class

    I had to pick a book on a list i was given to in class and then write an essay on the book i read, if the book was classic or not. I didnt want to read this book at 1st but i couldnt put the book down once i started. I loved this book it might seem odd but it was really good. :)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2014

    A great story by a beloved author.

    This book really doesn't require a big introduction, it's a timeless classic that has lasted through the years.

    To the 8th grader would rather drink poison than read this book. I'm 62 years old and I first read this book when I was 4years old. As one ages they find old books like these to be companions and friends. I'm sorry you feel forced to read such treasured book. However, I've found that if I just read the book, I'll get involved in it and start to enjoy it. Sort of like the twilight books that I would rather eat glass than be forced to read them. ...smile.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2013

    Silverfur

    Thanks (you can join my other evil coan it is at sickness first result i am snowclaw there)

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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