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Kidnapped (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)
     

Kidnapped (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)

3.3 9
by Robert Louis Stevenson
 

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This edition includes a modern introduction and a list of suggested further reading.
 
Kidnapped by a rival heir (his Scrooge-like uncle), and destined to be sold in the colonies, teenager David Balfour is shipwrecked on the coast of his homeland, Scotland. The tale of David Balfour's swashbuckling adventures and psychological misadventures has

Overview


This edition includes a modern introduction and a list of suggested further reading.
 
Kidnapped by a rival heir (his Scrooge-like uncle), and destined to be sold in the colonies, teenager David Balfour is shipwrecked on the coast of his homeland, Scotland. The tale of David Balfour's swashbuckling adventures and psychological misadventures has remained constantly in print, a "must read" for children and adults alike.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781411468535
Publisher:
Barnes & Noble
Publication date:
03/13/2012
Series:
Barnes & Noble Digital Library
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
256
File size:
723 KB

Meet the Author


Robert Louis Stevenson was born in 1850 in Edinburgh. His father was an engineer, the head of a family firm that had constructed most of Scotland's lighthouses, and the family had a comfortable income. Stevenson was an only child and was often ill; as a result, he was much coddled by both his parents and his long-time nurse. The family took frequent trips to southern Europe to escape the cruel Edinburgh winters, trips that, along with his many illnesses, caused Stevenson to miss much of his formal schooling. He entered Edinburgh University in 1867, intending to become an engineer and enter the family business, but he was a desultory, disengaged student and never took a degree. In 1871, Stevenson switched his study to law, a profession which would leave time for his already-budding literary ambitions, and he managed to pass the bar in 1875.

Illness put an end to his legal career before it had even started, and Stevenson spent the next few years traveling in Europe and writing travel essays and literary criticism. In 1876, Stevenson fell in love with Fanny Vandergrift Osbourne, a married American woman more than ten years his senior, and returned with her to London, where he published his first fiction, "The Suicide Club." In 1879, Stevenson set sail for America, apparently in response to a telegram from Fanny, who had returned to California in an attempt to reconcile with her husband. Fanny obtained a divorce and the couple married in 1880, eventually returning to Europe, where they lived for the next several years. Stevenson was by this time beset by terrifying lung hemorrhages that would appear without warning and required months of convalescence in a healthy climate. Despite his periodic illnesses and his peripatetic life, Stevenson completed some of his most enduring works during this period: Treasure Island (1883), A Child's Garden of Verses (1885), Kidnapped (1886), and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886).

After his father's death and a trip to Edinburgh which he knew would be his last, Stevenson set sail once more for America in 1887 with his wife, mother, and stepson. In 1888, after spending a frigid winter in the Adirondack Mountains, Stevenson chartered a yacht and set sail from California bound for the South Pacific. The Stevensons spent time in Tahiti, Hawaii, Micronesia, and Australia, before settling in Samoa, where Stevenson bought a plantation called Vailima. Though he kept up a vigorous publishing schedule, Stevenson never returned to Europe. He died of a sudden brain hemorrhage on December 3, 1894.

Author biography from the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
November 13, 1850
Date of Death:
December 3, 1894
Place of Birth:
Edinburgh, Scotland
Place of Death:
Vailima, Samoa
Education:
Edinburgh University, 1875

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Kidnapped (Enriched Classics Series) 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of my all time favorites. I first read kidnapped in high school after being recomended by a friend. 30years later and read three times i still find it hard to put down. They dont write them like that anymore.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im bored
LisasGeode More than 1 year ago
This paragon of colorful and lovely writing is now often classified as YA, young adult. My unabridged version would be a challenge for less than a strong high school reader. The language is appropriate for the mid-1700s setting primarily in Scotland. That makes the vocabulary sometimes obscure or unfamiliar to twenty-first century readers. That is surely not a complaint. The story, language, and structure are terrific and the footnotes and dictionary in this version really helped with that. The story: David Balfour at age 17 becomes an orphan upon the death of his father. Following instructions his father had given the local preacher, David seeks the uncle he never before knew existed, the one holding the family’s traditional manor. The uncle’s shady dealings with some sailors lead to the sailors’ taking away David without his consent. Upon the ship, David faces personal hardships as well as seeing rather unsavory men doing rather unsavory things. When a curious event leads to Alan Breck’s entrance onto the ship, David’s life changes in ways he couldn’t have foreseen. He and Breck become allies and friends through many harrowing events, including a battle with the ship’s sailors, shipwreck, false accusations, overcoming political differences, and life on the run through dangerous and inhospitable terrain in Scotland. The politics of the day influence their tale and life in Scotland, where many disagree with the British king. David as a character is very well made, Breck nearly so, and their relationship, which becomes central to the story in many ways, is developed beautifully. This reader was a bit surprised that the tale never left the British Isles, but found it to be exotic, exciting, and captivating. Good adventure in great writing.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was really into reading this book it is very dramatic. I couldnt put it down i was really into how the kid was coming along straight to the end. It is based with the political side of how goverment was in ireland back when the british ruled it. I found it sad but intriging. I find the book to be ok
Bill Hughes More than 1 year ago
the sample is boring all it is it tells about the auther for like 30 pages and then it is only 1 page of the book.