Kids Make History: A New Look at America's Story
  • Kids Make History: A New Look at America's Story
  • Kids Make History: A New Look at America's Story

Kids Make History: A New Look at America's Story

5.0 2
by Randy Jones, Susan Buckley, Elspeth Leacock
     
 

Feel what it is like to participate in history as you follow in the footsteps of the young men and women who lived it. You will survive a harsh James Towne winter and battle the Redcoats in a Long Island cornfield; you will carry letters on the Pony Express and plant crops with Laura Ingalls; you will stow away on a whaling ship and help in the defense after the

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Overview

Feel what it is like to participate in history as you follow in the footsteps of the young men and women who lived it. You will survive a harsh James Towne winter and battle the Redcoats in a Long Island cornfield; you will carry letters on the Pony Express and plant crops with Laura Ingalls; you will stow away on a whaling ship and help in the defense after the attack on Pearl Harbor. With hundreds of visual and verbal facts, each story in Kids Make History has been thoroughly researched and meticulously illustrated.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Perfect for daily reading aloud in history class, this useful resource will be a hit with teachers and student alike." Kirkus Reviews

A good browsing choice for children interested in American history.
School Library Journal

Children's Literature - Phyllis Kennemer
Twenty isolated events from U.S. history are presented from viewpoints of young people living in those times. The first two take place in 1607 and 1608. Both include a young Pocahontas and her interactions with the first English settlers. These are followed by twelve-year-old Ann Putnam's role in the Salem witch trials (1692). The two entries for the 1700s feature a young indentured servant from Scotland in 1743 and a fifteen-year-old drummer boy during the Revolutionary War. The eight entries for the 1880s begin with a young boy helping slaves escape through the Underground Railroad in 1836 and conclude with Laura Ingalls' travels, which began in 1868. Theodore Roosevelt's children living in the White House in 1902 appears at the beginning of the next century. Other entries take place in 1909 (the Erie Canal), 1926 (an orphan train), 1941 (Pearl Harbor), 1955 (Mexican immigrant workers), and 1963 (the civil rights movement). The concluding story is about two high school boys in New York who witnessed the explosion of the Twin Towers on September 11, 2001. Each episode is presented on a two-page spread and is illustrated in intricate detail with maps and drawings. Specific items within the illustrations are numbered to match corresponding numbers in the text. Each standalone story is interesting, but the book would be more useful for classroom use or instruction if there had been some identifiable theme—perhaps stories from a specific time period or about a particular era within our history, such as traveling west on wagon trains or participating in the civil rights movement. Research notes and an index appear at the end of the book.
School Library Journal

Gr 4–8
This book introduces 20 children in extraordinary times, starting in 1607 with Pocahontas and ending in 2001 with 9/11 as experienced by high school senior Jukay Hsu. Laura Ingalls Wilder; John Rankin, Jr.; and Susie Baker, a young slave celebrating her independence in 1863, are among those included. The text and the highly detailed watercolor illustrations are married with numbers in small red boxes keyed to both elements for clarification. The authors use quotations and fictionalized dialogue, distinguishing between the two with quotes and single quotes. (Oddly, this coding is explained on the last spread, so kids won't know the difference as they read the book.) Often, readers will be left wanting to know more and will need to be directed to more in-depth accounts. A good browsing choice for children interested in American history.
—Lisa Gangemi KroppCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
This fourth entry in the team's series tells 20 stories of young people who made history. From Pocahontas, Sam Collier in James Towne and the Salem witch trials to Malcolm Hooks's nonviolent protests in Birmingham, Ala., and Jukay Hsu and other Stuyvesant High School students volunteering at the Red Cross center on 9/11, this lively and informative volume tells much history through informative vignettes. Each two-page spread includes a small map with a red dot that locates where the story takes place, a dramatic watercolor illustration and a brief essay with red numbers to link text to map. Perfect for daily reading aloud in history class, this useful resource will be a hit with teachers and students alike. (introduction, acknowledgments, notes, index) (Nonfiction. 9-12)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780618223299
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
10/30/2006
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
11.00(w) x 9.50(h) x 0.13(d)
Age Range:
10 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Susan Buckley has developed more than ten elementary social studies programs and was the general editor of Houghton Mifflin’s We the People. She has written many history and geography books for children and teachers. She lives in New York City.

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Kids Make History: A New Look at America's Story 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
At first glance, you might mistake KIDS MAKE HISTORY as a children's book. After further inspection, though, you'll realize that this great title in the A NEW LOOK AT AMERICA'S STORY series is a wonderful fact-based reference book for anyone, regardless of age.

There are twenty true stories included in this book, all featuring kids who helped make history. Spanning the years from 1607 to 2001, each story includes a young adult who made a difference in one or another--and, in some cases, even managed to have an impact on historical events.

Powhatan's Favorite Daughter (1607)--The real story of Pocohantas.
James Towne Boy (1608)--The story of Sam Collier, a boy from James Towne.
Evil in the Air (1692)--Ann Putnam, a girl from Salem Village.
Kidnapped (1743)--Peter Williamson, an indentured servant.
Yankee Doodle Soldier (1776)--The story of Joseph Plumb Martin, a soldier in the Continental Army.
The House on the Hill (1838)--John Rankin, Jr., a young hero of the Underground Railroad.
"Never Take No Cutoffs" (1846)--Virginia Reed, a young member of the Donner Party.
Pony Rider (1854)--The story of Nick Wilson, a Pony Express rider.
Pull-Up Boy (1860)--Marty Myers, who at age six began working at the Sligo Iron Works.
Working for Freedom (1863)--Susie Baker, a member of the First South Carolina Volunteers.
Pioneer Girl (1868)--The true story of Laura Ingalls Wilder.
"There Blows!" (1875)--George Fred Tilton, a young boy on a whaling ship.
"A Most Wonderful Sight" (1893)--Jane Sever, a visitor at the Chicago World's Fair.
High Jinks in the White House (1902)--The six children of Theodore and Edith Roosevelt.
Low Bridge! (1909)--Richard Garrity and his family's life aboard a canal boat.
Riding the Orphan Train (1926)--Al Clement, a young orphan picked from among others on a train.
Sunday Morning at Pearl Harbor (1941)--A young girl, Joan Zuber, lives through the attack on Pearl Harbor.
On the Circuit (1955)--Francisco Jimenez, a sixth-grader working in the cotton fields.
"It's About Freedom" (1963)--Malcolm Hooks, marching for equal rights.
9/11: The Day the Towers Fell (2001)--Two high school students, Jukay Hsu and Amit Friedlander, experience 9/11.

This is a great book for anyone interested in history, and especially the roles that young adults have played in making our country what it is today. A wonderful read!
Guest More than 1 year ago
At first glance, you might mistake KIDS MAKE HISTORY as a children's book. After further inspection, though, you'll realize that this great title in the A NEW LOOK AT AMERICA'S STORY series is a wonderful fact-based reference book for anyone, regardless of age. There are twenty true stories included in this book, all featuring kids who helped make history. Spanning the years from 1607 to 2001, each story includes a young adult who made a difference in one or another--and, in some cases, even managed to have an impact on historical events. Powhatan's Favorite Daughter (1607)--The real story of Pocohantas. James Towne Boy (1608)--The story of Sam Collier, a boy from James Towne. Evil in the Air (1692)--Ann Putnam, a girl from Salem Village. Kidnapped (1743)--Peter Williamson, an indentured servant. Yankee Doodle Soldier (1776)--The story of Joseph Plumb Martin, a soldier in the Continental Army. The House on the Hill (1838)--John Rankin, Jr., a young hero of the Underground Railroad. 'Never Take No Cutoffs' (1846)--Virginia Reed, a young member of the Donner Party. Pony Rider (1854)--The story of Nick Wilson, a Pony Express rider. Pull-Up Boy (1860)--Marty Myers, who at age six began working at the Sligo Iron Works. Working for Freedom (1863)--Susie Baker, a member of the First South Carolina Volunteers. Pioneer Girl (1868)--The true story of Laura Ingalls Wilder. 'There Blows!' (1875)--George Fred Tilton, a young boy on a whaling ship. 'A Most Wonderful Sight' (1893)--Jane Sever, a visitor at the Chicago World's Fair. High Jinks in the White House (1902)--The six children of Theodore and Edith Roosevelt. Low Bridge! (1909)--Richard Garrity and his family's life aboard a canal boat. Riding the Orphan Train (1926)--Al Clement, a young orphan picked from among others on a train. Sunday Morning at Pearl Harbor (1941)--A young girl, Joan Zuber, lives through the attack on Pearl Harbor. On the Circuit (1955)--Francisco Jimenez, a sixth-grader working in the cotton fields. 'It's About Freedom' (1963)--Malcolm Hooks, marching for equal rights. 9/11: The Day the Towers Fell (2001)--Two high school students, Jukay Hsu and Amit Friedlander, experience 9/11. This is a great book for anyone interested in history, and especially the roles that young adults have played in making our country what it is today. A wonderful read! **Reviewed by: Jennifer Wardrip, aka 'The Genius'