The Kill Artist (Gabriel Allon Series #1)

The Kill Artist (Gabriel Allon Series #1)

4.1 257
by Daniel Silva
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Former Israeli intelligence operative Gabriel Allon is drawn back into the game to take on a cunning terrorist on one last killing spree, a Palestinian zealot who played a dark part in Gabriel's past. And what begins as a manhunt turns into a globe-spanning duel fueled by both political intrigue and deep personal passions...See more details below

  • Checkmark First In Series NOOK Books  Shop Now
  • Checkmark Spies Like These  Shop Now

Overview

Former Israeli intelligence operative Gabriel Allon is drawn back into the game to take on a cunning terrorist on one last killing spree, a Palestinian zealot who played a dark part in Gabriel's past. And what begins as a manhunt turns into a globe-spanning duel fueled by both political intrigue and deep personal passions...

Editorial Reviews

What seemed at first like a promising career has now veered toward the predictable and slightly silly. Silva's first novel, The Unlikely Spy, was a new take on a tired genre. His second and third books, while not as fresh, were satisfying high-speed adventures. With this book, Silva has slipped into the rousing-but-exhausted world of Robert Ludlum. The hero of the story is Gabriel Allon, a onetime master spy for the Israeli intelligence service who is so good he goes by only his last name (are you tracking the silliness quotient?). Allon bailed out of the spy business when his wife and child were killed, presumably by the Palestinian superterrorist Tariq. When Tariq surfaces years later with plans to derail the Middle East peace process, revenge compels Allon to join in the search. From there it's pretty much a straightforward fox hunt, which in this genre means the fox is often the one doing the hunting. The book lacks depth and when you're done, you'll have to remind yourself who wrote the thing. Frankly, it could have been one of about six writers, all of whom are kicking out the same kind of book, complete with interchangeable characters and indistinguishable plots.
—Randy Michael Signor

Library Journal
A former Mossad agent, now an art restorer, is tapped to help thwart a Palestinian plot to halt peace talks by assassinating Yasir Arafat. Another December 26 release. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
From the Publisher
[A] heart-stopping complex yarn of international terrorism and intrigue...A thrilling roller-coaster ride, keeping readers guessing until the mind-bending conclusion." —Publishers Weekly

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781440627903
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/06/2004
Series:
Gabriel Allon Series , #1
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
512
Sales rank:
414
File size:
0 MB
Age Range:
18 Years

Read an Excerpt

By coincidence Timothy Peel arrived in the village the same week in July as the stranger. He and his mother moved into a ramshackle cottage at the head of the tidal creek with her latest lover, a struggling playwright named Derek, who drank too much wine and detested children. The stranger arrived two days later, settling into the old foreman's cottage just up the creek from the oyster farm.

Peel had little to do that summer - when Derek and his mother weren't making clamorous love, they were taking inspirational forced marches along the cliffs - so he determined to find out exactly who the stranger was and what he was doing in Cornwall. Peel decided the best way to begin was to watch. Because he was eleven, and the only child of divorced parents, Peel was well schooled in the art of human observation and investigation. Like any good surveillance artist, he required a fixed post. He settled on his bedroom window, which had an unobstructed view over the creek. In the storage shed he found a pair of ancient Zeiss binoculars, and at the village store he purchased a small notebook and ballpoint pen for recording his watch report.

The first thing Peel noticed was that the stranger liked old objects. His car was a vintage MG roadster. Peel would watch from his window as the man hunched over the motor for hours at a time, his back poking from beneath the bonnet. A man of great concentration, Peel concluded. A man of great mental endurance.

After a month the stranger vanished. A few days passed, then a week, then a fortnight. Peel feared the stranger had spotted him and taken flight. Bored senseless without the routine of watching, Peel got into trouble. He was caught hurling a rock though the window of a tea shop in the village. Derek sentenced him to a week of solitary confinement in his bedroom.

But that evening Peel managed to slip out with his binoculars. He walked along the quay, past the stranger's darkened cottage and the oyster farm, and stood at the point where the creek fed into the Helford River, watching the sailboats coming in with the tide. He spotted a ketch heading in under power. He raised the binoculars to his eyes and studied the figure standing at the wheel.

The stranger had come back to Port Navas.

The ketch was old and badly in need of restoration, and the stranger cared for it with the same devotion he had shown his fickle MG. He toiled for several hours each day: sanding, varnishing, painting, polishing brass, changing lines and canvas. When the weather was warm he would strip to the waist. Peel couldn't help but compare the stranger's body with Derek's. Derek was soft and flabby; the stranger was compact and very hard, the kind of man you would quickly regret picking a fight with. By the end of August his skin had turned nearly as dark as the varnish he was so meticulously applying to the deck of the ketch.

He would disappear aboard the boat for days at a time. Peel had no way to follow him. He could only imagine where the stranger was going. Down the Helford to the sea? Around the Lizard to St. Michael's Mount or Penzance? Maybe around the cape to St. Ives.

Then Peel hit upon another possibility. Cornwall was famous for its pirates; indeed, the region still had its fair share of smugglers. Perhaps the stranger was running the ketch out to sea to meet cargo vessels and ferry contraband to shore.

The next time the stranger returned from one of his voyages, Peel stood a strict watch in his window, hoping to catch him in the act of removing contraband from the boat. But as he leaped from the prow of the ketch onto the quay, he had nothing in his hands but a canvas rucksack and plastic rubbish bag.

The stranger sailed for pleasure, not profit.

Peel took out his notebook and drew a line through the word smuggler.

The large parcel arrived the first week of September, a flat wooden crate, nearly as big as a barn door. It came in a van from London, accompanied by an agitated man in pinstripes. The stranger's days immediately assumed a reverse rhythm. At night the top floor of the cottage burned with light - not normal light, Peel observed, but a very clear white light. In the mornings, when Peel left home for school, he would see the stranger heading down the creek in the ketch, or working on his MG, or setting off in a pair of battered hiking boots to pound the footpaths of the Helford Passage. Peel supposed he slept afternoons, though he seemed like a man who could go a long time without rest.

Peel wondered what the stranger was doing all night. Late one evening he decided to have a closer look. He pulled on a sweater and coat and slipped out of the cottage without telling his mother. He stood on the quay. looking up at the stranger's cottage. The windows were open; a sharp odor hung on the air, something between rubbing alcohol and petrol. He could also hear music of some sort - singing, opera perhaps.

Read More

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher

[A] heart-stopping complex yarn of international terrorism and intrigue...A thrilling roller-coaster ride, keeping readers guessing until the mind-bending conclusion." —Publishers Weekly

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >