Kill the Body, the Head Will Fall: A Closer Look at Women, Violence, and Aggression [NOOK Book]

Overview

The outspoken, articulate, and brilliant author of "The New Victorians" debunks the persistent belief that women are inherently less aggressive and less violent than men and examines the concept of aggression in this myth-shattering, eye-opening work. Through research, interviews with experts, analysis, and her own experience in the boxing ring, Denfeld presents a revisionist view of women, aggression, and violence, and addresses such issues as why women commit child abuse and other crimes; why women often feel ...
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Kill the Body, the Head Will Fall: A Closer Look at Women, Violence, and Aggression

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Overview

The outspoken, articulate, and brilliant author of "The New Victorians" debunks the persistent belief that women are inherently less aggressive and less violent than men and examines the concept of aggression in this myth-shattering, eye-opening work. Through research, interviews with experts, analysis, and her own experience in the boxing ring, Denfeld presents a revisionist view of women, aggression, and violence, and addresses such issues as why women commit child abuse and other crimes; why women often feel guilty and our of control when enraged; how female competition is often subverted into hidden, often vicious reals; and the intersection between sex and violence.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Denfeld (The New Victorians) began boxing on the amateur level in 1993 and two years later won a Golden Gloves championship. Opening with a survey of technique, followed by an apologia for the sport and an account of her first sparring session, she then develops her principal thesis: women sometimes can be as aggressive and as violent as men. In support of this contention, she examines anger in the female; abuse and violence committed by women against children or adults with whom they have relationships; female criminals; and females in the military and in sports. Although few will disagree with her view that the differences between men and women are not as significant as has been thought, the book will raise some hackles. At a time when many psychologists are arguing that the "masculinizing" of boys and young men can create more problems than it solves, Denfeld's unspoken assumption that females can be just as macho as males may not win universal approval. Fight fans will find her views on the sport of interest. Author tour. (Feb.)
Kirkus Reviews
A writer's thoughtful look at the personal and social implications of her foray into the "manly art" of boxing.

In 1993, after lawsuits had forced the opening of amateur boxing to women, Denfeld joined the Grand Avenue boxing gym in Portland, Ore., becoming a competitive and successful fighter. In this book, Denfeld describes her experience in sweaty and bruising detail, and uses boxing as a window on the politics of female aggression. She recounts the suspicion and discomfort of the men at the gym when she began her training and how, as she became more skillful, they came to see her not as a woman but as a fighter. Similarly, as her own confidence developed, Denfeld found that she could be every bit as aggressive in the ring as the men. Denfeld argues that the denial of female aggression and the trivialization of female violence are roadblocks to women's equality—depriving them of opportunities in sports and the military, for example. It is also socially dangerous; women's sexual abuse of children, for instance, is rarely discussed. This book has greater authority than The New Victorians (1995), Denfeld's critique of contemporary feminists: She knows more about boxing than she did about feminism. But it would have been even more interesting if she had woven her own background into this story. She makes no mention of her biracial identity, although society, as she notes, regards the aggression of women of color differently from that of white women. Denfeld also grew up poor, which she briefly mentions; since class, too, shapes women's relationship to aggression, anger, and competition, this warrants more discussion.

Despite some holes, a well-rendered personal account of female athletic experience—a rare offering. Denfeld also makes an engaging contribution to popular discussion of female aggression, a subject that clearly merits closer attention.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780446570022
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
  • Publication date: 11/29/2009
  • Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 390 KB

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Foreword
1 The First Day in the Gym 1
2 The Sweet Science 15
3 Are Women the Weaker Sex? 23
4 Women in Anger: The Stereotypes Prove False 37
5 The Myth of the Maternal Instinct: The Underexamined Problem of Child Abuse Committed by Women 47
6 Violence in Relationships: It's Not Always a One-Way Street 63
7 Criminal Women 77
8 The Power of Fear 101
9 Jess 109
10 Women in the Military 115
11 Female Competition 129
12 Women in Sports 135
13 Aggression and Eros 151
14 The Future of Female Aggression 161
Notes 169
Selected Bibliography 177
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