Killer's Law

Killer's Law

5.0 1
by L. Ron Hubbard, R.F. Daley, Brooke Bloom, Corey Burton, Bob Caso
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions


Sheriff Kyle of Deadeye, Nevada, is headed east to the nation’s capital. Like Dennis Weaver in the television series McCloud, Kyle’s about to discover that the law can be even wilder in the big city than in the Wild West. It’s a fact that hits home when he’s the one accused . . . of murder.

Kyle’s come to the city to give a report

Overview


Sheriff Kyle of Deadeye, Nevada, is headed east to the nation’s capital. Like Dennis Weaver in the television series McCloud, Kyle’s about to discover that the law can be even wilder in the big city than in the Wild West. It’s a fact that hits home when he’s the one accused . . . of murder.

Kyle’s come to the city to give a report to his senator on the misdeeds of Nevada’s filthy rich copper kings. But before he has a chance, he’s knocked unconscious, later coming to alongside his senator—now dead, with Kyle’s knife imbedded in the corpse.

Welcome to Washington D.C., where corruption, intrigue and murder are all in a day’s work. Kyle’s got no alibi, no memory, and apparently doesn’t have a prayer . . . unless he can find a way to outwit, outfox and outmaneuver the masters of deception and double-crosses.

Much like Kyle, L. Ron Hubbard was born and bred on the western frontier and made his way east to explore and experience life in Washington, D.C.  But unlike the sheriff, Hubbard enjoyed his time in the capital, where he went to college at Georgetown.  He came to know the ins and outs of the city as well as he knew the arroyos and canyons of the west, giving him the kind of insights he needed to write stories like Killers Law.

Also includes the mysteries They Killed Him Dead, in which a respected homicide detective solves a murder several times over, only to be proved wrong again and again, to the amusement of his fellow cops; Mad Dog Murder, the story of a patrol officer who dreams of joining the homicide squad, and finds that the ticket to advancement—and romance—may be a Pekinese dog; and The Blow Torch Murders, in which every criminal in town is eager to turn himself in . . . and the reason is a real killer.

“Listeners will have a genuine sense that they are back in the Golden Age of radio.” —The Strand Magazine
 

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Audio
Collected here are four of Hubbard's golden age pulps—"Killer's Law," "They Killed Him Dead," "The Mad Dog Murder," and "The Blow Torch Murder"—tales of corruption, intrigue, crime, and, of course, murder. For all four stories, R.F. Daley provides spot-on, fast-paced narration—as if he were a lawyer with a woefully short amount of time to communicate key information to a condemned man. The spirited performance of the full cast provides even minor characters with distinctive, if occasionally caricatured, voices. But caricatured or not, the characters featured in these whodunits require such treatment. As with previous Hubbard titles, this audio edition boasts sound effects and music, giving it the feel of an old-time radio drama. Listeners in search of quick, plot-driven stories will find just what they're looking for—and with four stories packed into two hours, this audiobook is the very definition of brisk entertainment. A Galaxy Press paperback. (Oct.)
From the Publisher

“…one of the great pulp writers, with colorful prose, lively action writing, exotic locales, fresh variations on standard characters and situations, and well-constructed plots.” —Ellery Queen

"Hubbard was one of the great pulp writers." —Publishers Weekly

"A series not to be missed by any true pulp-fiction fan."  —Comics Buyers Guide

"He wrote Westerns, swashbucklers, air adventure, mysteries, espionage thrillers, science fiction, fantasy, tales of the Orient, sea tales, and even Yukon tales in the tradition of Jack London." — Antique Trader

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781592122769
Publisher:
Galaxy Press, LLC
Publication date:
10/22/2012
Series:
Stories from the Golden Age
Edition description:
First Edition, Unabridged
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 5.70(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
12 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

With 19 New York Times bestsellers and more than 230 million copies of his works in circulation, L. Ron Hubbard is among the most acclaimed and widely read authors of our time. As a leading light of American Pulp Fiction through the 1930s and '40s, he is further among the most influential authors of the modern age. Indeed, from Ray Bradbury to Stephen King, there is scarcely a master of imaginative tales who has not paid tribute to L. Ron Hubbard.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Killer's Law 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
tomjohnson1940 More than 1 year ago
“A fast-Paced Fun Read.” This short story collection contains four short mystery stories from the era of the pulp magazines. The first story, KILLER’S LAW, was published in the September 1947 issue of NEW DEDECTIVE MAGAZINE. This collection also contains THEY KILLED HIM DEAD, the THE MAD DOG MURDER, and THE BLOW TORCH MURDER. In KILLER’S LAW, Sheriff Kyle arrives in Washington D.C. from Deadeye, Navada, with paperwork against a certain criminal being investigated by Senator Morran. Bur upon reaching the senator’s apartment, he’s knocked out and the paperwork stolen. Upon waking up, he finds him surrounded by local police and charged with the murder of the senator. His knife is sticking in the senator’s chest. He escapes from custody and switching clothes with a bum, conducts his own investigation of the people involved, and comes up with the killer. In THEY KILLED HIM DEAD, “Careful” Cassidy of the homicide squad hears a shot just before turning the corner of a sidewalk, and spots a man holding a smoking gun, and a dead man prone on the pavement. Figuring he had the murderer at the scene, he arrest the fella and calls for the Black Maria (paddy wagon). At the police station, the coroner tell him the man didn’t die from the gunshot, he died from stab wounds by a knife. So Cassidy follows this new lead back to the scene, where he discovers a path of blood. Following the blood leads him to Greek cook who admits killing the man after he attacked him from behind. Once more the Black Maria and another murderer taken to a cell. But the coroner drops another bomb on Cassidy; the knife didn’t kill the man, either. His spine was broken. That must have killed him. By now Cassidy is becoming the laughing stock of the police station, but off he goes again to look for another clue, this time back to the Greek café. Spying the wall behind the café, where the man must have fallen on the cook, Cassidy climbs up and sees a rooming house next door. Venturing there, he finds a nervous janitor, and with a little persuasion, gets a confession. The janitor found the man on the bench where he shouldn’t be, and pushed him. Finding him dead, he panics and tosses him over the wall. Cassidy doesn’t like his story, so a call for the Black Maria. Back at headquarters, the coroner once again tells Cassidy he was wrong, and he choked to death on a ring. Cassidy already figured the guy was a thief, so he examined the dead man’s property and finds a woman’s pocket book with a name and address. Once more he heads for the house of another suspect. This time finding a man and woman who quickly admit killing the thief. Another ride to headquarters in the Black Maria. Will Careful Cassidy finally unravel this puzzle, and find a murderer in the mix, or will his reputation be forever ruined on this strange killing? In THE MAD DOG MURDER, Patrolmen Tommy Farrell and Butch Harmon receive a call about a mad dog. Upon arriving at the hotel, they find a dog foaming at the mouth, and an elderly man with tooth marks in his hand where the dog had bit him. The elderly gentleman dies from rabies at the hospital. But Tommy, wanting to become a detective, doesn’t like the scenario, and has the dog tested for rabies and does his own investigation. It helps that the owner of the dog is a beautiful young girl, of course. Using a little trick he learned, he brings a murderer to light. The final story is THE BLOW TORCH MURDER. Weasel Martin, Chink Edwards, Papa Johnson, and Joey the Mick,
BillyB More than 1 year ago
Galaxy Press has been releasing the short stories written by author L. Ron Hubbard that were published during the golden age under the Stories of a Golden Age line of paperbacks and audiobooks. They nicely sent me a free audiobook of the "Killer's Law" for this review. "Killer's Law" was originally published in the September 1947 issue of New Detective Magazine, where Sheriff Kyle travels from Deadeye, Nevada to Washington D.C. to personally deliver evidence against a rich copper king to Senator Meringue. Suddenly, Kyle is knocked unconscious. When he awakes he is surrounded by policemen asking questions and reporters snapping pictures. It seems that the Senator was murdered and Kyle is holding the murder weapon. This is an intriguing mystery with a major twist in the first few minutes. Kyle, the hero, must try to prove his innocence without having an alibi or no memory of what happened to the Senator. He must use his detective wits to solve the case. There are three additional mystery stories in this audiobook. The second is called "They Killed Him Dead," which finds detective Careful Cassidy catching a killer red-handed at a crime scene, but the problem is that he didn't actually see the suspect kill the victim. There is also no motivation for the killing and no murder weapon. ""They Killed Him Dead" is a humorous mystery tale about an old-fashioned, respected homicide cop who keeps bring in the wrong suspects in one night. Everyone at the police station is now laughing at him, but Cassidy is determined to catch the killer. Officer Tommy Farrell dreams of being on the homicide squad in "Mad Dog Murder," but he is stuck sitting in car 17 with his partner, Butch Handland. That is until he gets a call about a mad dog being lost in an apartment where a man, Uncle Meyers, has been bitten by the Pekingese named Toto. Tommy takes a shine to the dog's owner, June Beach, who claims that the dog does not have rabies, despite the fact that the dog is foaming at the mouth. Tommy and Butch take the dog in to be checked out and learn a startling truth. "Mad Dog Murder" is not your typical police procedure story, as there is humor and a taste of romance. Hamm Logan is left with his sergeant at the police station for the 6 PM to 6 AM shift in "The Blow Torch Murders," in which several known criminals come into the station and volunteer to be arrested. Weasel admits that he stole a car, Chick breaks a window, and Papa Johnson and Joey the Mick admits that they just assaulted a woman. At around midnight, a lawyer named Lambert wants the men to be release due to the lack of evidence. Hamm wants to know what the hell is going on. He soon realizes that the men were creating alibis as their mob boss, Dude MacFarlane, has been found dead. Someone had put a blow torch down his mouth and set him on fire. Once again Galaxy Press has put together four great tales (about 30 minutes each) with an amazing voice cast and sound effects. The main characters are die hard cops that go by the book! Each plot is completely unique with twists and turns around every corner. I had a blast listening to each story and I recommend it to all mystery lovers.