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Killing the Messenger: 100 Years of Media Criticism / Edition 2
     

Killing the Messenger: 100 Years of Media Criticism / Edition 2

by Tom Goldstein
 

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ISBN-10: 0231118333

ISBN-13: 9780231118330

Pub. Date: 04/03/2007

Publisher: Columbia University Press

Killing the Messenger has long been a popular resource for readers eager to experience the best media criticism of the past century. Selections are chosen from magazines, journals, official reports, public speeches, and books that have been long out of print and cover a range of issues: the inadequacy of the press to police themselves, the importance of

Overview

Killing the Messenger has long been a popular resource for readers eager to experience the best media criticism of the past century. Selections are chosen from magazines, journals, official reports, public speeches, and books that have been long out of print and cover a range of issues: the inadequacy of the press to police themselves, the importance of ethics and training, the problem of bias and sensationalism, and the threat of censorship.

Pieces by Theodore Roosevelt, Louis Brandeis, Joseph Pulitzer, Upton Sinclair, Spiro Agnew, George Seldes, and John Hersey, among others, are now joined by A. J. Liebling's early warning of the dangers of media consolidation, Will Irwin's analysis of journalism's growing power and pervasiveness, Daniel P. Moynihan's look at the changing relationship between the press and the presidency in 1971, Robert Darnton's essay on creative license, and Leo C. Rosten's statistical survey of the sociological makeup of newspaper correspondents in 1930s Washington and the effect of a journalist's "psychology" on the character of his reporting.

Killing the Messenger serves as a valuable reminder that criticizing the press is an old and invaluable tradition in our country and that many of today's issues have their roots in these fascinating and provocative examples of early criticism.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780231118330
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Publication date:
04/03/2007
Edition description:
revised edition
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Table of Contents

PrefacePart 1. Reporting on Public and Private MattersThe Right to Privacy, by Samuel Warren and Louis BrandeisEditorials from the Emporia Gazette, 1901–1921, by William Allen WhiteThe Press and the Individual, by George SeldesPart 2. The Power of the Press and How to Curb ItThe American Newspaper: A Study of Journalism in Relation to the Public, by Will IrwinSelection from The Brass Check, by Upton SinclairSelection from the "Report of the Commission on Freedom of the Press", by Robert Maynard HutchinsThe End of Free Lunch, by A. J. LieblingPart 3. Journalists and Their Biases—Conscious or Not?The Man with the Muckrake, by Theodore RooseveltSpeeches on the Media, by Spiro AgnewThe Presidency and the Press, by Daniel P. MoynihanA Test of the News, by Walter Lippmann and Charles MerzPart 4. Telling Stories: Facts, Truth, and the NewsWriting News and Telling Stories, by Robert DarntonNewspapers and the Truth, by Frederick Lewis AllenThe Legend on the License, by John HerseyPart 5. Making the Press ProfessionalSelections from the College of Journalism, by Joseph PulitzerThe Social Composition of Washington Correspondents, by Leo C. RostenThe Role of the Mass Media in Reporting of News about Minorities, by Commission on Civil DisordersIndex

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