Kindred Spirits: A Tribute to the Songs of Johnny Cash

Kindred Spirits: A Tribute to the Songs of Johnny Cash

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A standout among tributes, Kindred Spirits is a great album through and through. The high quality springs from the stature of the tribute's subject, Johnny Cash, whose catalogue is incomparably rich, deep, and soulful, and the commitment of a cast of roots rockers who never once deign to phone it in. The material here not only

Overview

A standout among tributes, Kindred Spirits is a great album through and through. The high quality springs from the stature of the tribute's subject, Johnny Cash, whose catalogue is incomparably rich, deep, and soulful, and the commitment of a cast of roots rockers who never once deign to phone it in. The material here not only traverses Cash's perennial themes of love, God, and murder but also includes a couple of evocative train songs, a prison song, and one of the all-time great kiss-off songs, "Understand Your Man," which Dwight Yoakam attacks with venom, rage, and even a smidgen of sadistic glee. But that's only the beginning. Rosanne Cash and the trio of Sheryl Crow, Emmylou Harris, and Mary Chapin Carpenter are nothing less than stunning on the poignant heartbreaker "I Still Miss Someone" and the exquisite "Flesh and Blood." Keb' Mo' offers a startling deconstruction of "Folsom Prison Blues," performing it as a bone-dry Delta-style blues number, with one telling lyric change -- "I shot a man in Reno/Just to watch him die" becomes "They said I shot a man down in Reno/That was just a lie" -- that utterly transforms this durable classic. Little Richard has his finest moment on record since 1970's "Freedom Blues" with a rocking take on "Get Rhythm" that burns as righteously as one of his classic '50s Specialty recordings. And it doesn't let up: Bruce Springsteen sings with Nebraska-like gravitas on "Give My Love to Rose," Steve Earle spins an Old West yarn on "Hardin Didn't Run," Bob Dylan offers a gruff, rumbling take on "Train of Love," and Hank Williams Jr. roars through "Big River." The pièce de r´esistance, however, is the closing gospel gem "Meet Me in Heaven," which Janette Carter -- a daughter of the Carter Family's A. P. and Sara Carter, she's Johnny's cousin by marriage -- renders in a chilling, weathered lead vocal, with a cameo from the Man in Black himself on a gripping verse. Producer Marty Stuart, who has a long history of doing right by his former father-in-law, delivers big-time here; this is great American music done with the respect, love, and conviction Johnny Cash's songs deserve. (Released at the same time, Dressed in Black: A Tribute to Johnny Cash is a more indie-centric, but equally gratifying, homage to Cash.)

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Hal Horowitz
The second of two Johnny Cash tribute discs released in September 2002 (the other is Dressed in Black: A Tribute to Johnny Cash) brings out the big guns in terms of marquee talent. As the album's coordinator, musician Marty Stuart has the background and contacts to pull this project off. Any collection with previously unreleased tracks from Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan, Dwight Yoakam, Emmylou Harris, and Steve Earle has built in credibility. All the participants are enthusiastic and dedicated, but the most stirring tracks inject a different spin to the originals. Dylan's spoken intro to "Train of Love" thanks Cash for standing up for him "way back when" before launching into one of the most emotionally stirring performances on this album. Little Richard does his best "Long Tall Sally" with a rock'em sock'em "Get Rhythm," but his voice isn't what it used to be and the song ends up sounding more like a Richard tune than a Cash one. Much better is Keb' Mo', who slows down "Folsom Prison Blues" to an ominous, swamp/bluesy crawl. Travis Tritt successfully rearranges "I Walk the Line" into a slow but menacing honky tonk ballad similar to how George Jones might approach it.

Product Details

Release Date:
02/01/2008
Label:
Sbme Special Mkts.
UPC:
0886972478920
catalogNumber:
724789
Rank:
57600

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Earl Scruggs   Acoustic Guitar
Marty Stuart   Acoustic Guitar,Mandolin,Electric Guitar,Vocals,Background Vocals
Rosanne Cash   Vocals
Emmylou Harris   Acoustic Guitar,Vocals
Travis Tritt   Acoustic Guitar,Vocals
Dwight Yoakam   Acoustic Guitar,Vocals
Connie Smith   Vocals
Steve Earle   Acoustic Guitar,Harmonica,Vocals
Bruce Springsteen   Acoustic Guitar,Vocals
Plas Johnson   Saxophone
Jeff Paris   Harmonica,Hammond Organ
Sheryl Crow   Accordion,Vocals
David Angell   Violin
Barry Beckett   Hammond Organ
Jesse Boyce   Organ,Bass
Pat Buchanan   Acoustic Guitar,Harmonica,Slide Guitar
Mary Chapin Carpenter   Vocals
June Carter Cash   Vocals
Chad Cromwell   Drums
Connie Ellisor   Violin
Tony Garnier   Bass
Vince Gill   Background Vocals
Carl Gorodetzky   Violin
Kevin Grantt   Bass
Michael Haynes   Trumpet
John Hobbs   Piano
Kelvin Holly   Guitar
John Jarvis   Hammond Organ
Reggie McBride   Bass
Chris McDonald   Trombone
Greg Morrow   Drums
Shawn Pelton   Drums
Michael Rhodes   Bass
Charlie Robison   Acoustic Guitar,Vocals
Pamela Sixfin   Violin
George Tidwell   Trumpet
Robby Turner   Steel Guitar
Biff Watson   Acoustic Guitar
Cheryl White   Background Vocals
Kris Wilkinson   Viola
Hank Williams   Vocals
Reese Wynans   Hammond Organ
Aubrey Haynie   Fiddle
W.S. Holland   Drums
Dave Roe Rorick   Bass
Darrin Vincent   Acoustic Guitar,Vocals
Janette Carter   Vocals
Ron Wall   Autoharp
Falconer   Drums
Steve Arnold   Bass
Dale Jett   Acoustic Guitar
John "Hot Fat Reynolds" Ferraro   Drums

Technical Credits

Marty Stuart   Producer
Johnny Cash   Composer
Bob Dylan   Engineer
Bruce Springsteen   Producer
Thom Cadley   Producer,Engineer
Chad Hailey   Engineer
John Jennings   Engineer
Kris Wilkinson   Orchestration
Rollow Welch   Art Direction
Tom Schick   Engineer
Claude "Swifty" Achille   Engineer
Tracy Baskette-Fleaner   Art Direction
Jeb Brien   Producer
Tony Castle   Engineer
Roy Cash   Composer
John Carter Cash   Engineer
Marvin Koner   Cover Photo
Vickie Russell   Creative Producer
John Mark Harris   Engineer
Mark Johnson   Engineer

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Kindred Spirits: A Tribute to the Songs of Johnny Cash 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm a huge Johnny Cash fan! In my mind, no one deserves as good a tribute album as this one. He's the father of country music, and anyone that grew up listening to him should check out this CD. It will bring back memories of the classics. Or, if you're just a fan of classic American music, I highly recommend it to you, also. Enjoy!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This has to be the greatest tribute album I have ever come across. What can you expect from Marty Stuart, Marty knows John's music.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Of course nobody does Johnny Cash like Johnny Cash, but the eclectic mix of artists on this tribute album shows how the Man in Black transcends barriers. Dwight Yoakam, Rosanne Cash, Bob Dylan, Little Richard, and Bruce Springsteen offer some great interpretations. Dylan's spoken intro at the beginning of "Train of Love" is very heart warming. Dylan and Cash have long admired each other's work. The only major complaint I have with this album is Keb' Mo's version of "Folsom Prison Blues." Perhaps this song should have been left off the album. Changing Cash's signature lyric from "I shot a man in Reno just to watch him die" to "They say I shot a man in Reno but that was just a lie" is almost sacreligious. The whole point of the orignial song is understanding the regret someone feels after committing murder. Yes, people are falsely accused of crimes and pay an unjust price. That point needs to be made in another song, however. Oh well. Other than that one song, this is still one of the better tribute albums out there.